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BUSINESS
July 13, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Teamsters local representing more than 1,200 meatpacking workers in eastern Washington state was placed under trusteeship Monday, less than a week after workers at a plant owned by IBP Inc. ended a bitter monthlong strike by narrowly approving a new contract.
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BUSINESS
June 10, 1999 | Nancy Cleeland
About 1,300 immigrant workers at the Pasco, Wash., slaughterhouse of meat processing giant IBP Inc. are on strike, protesting what they claim are inhumane and unsafe working conditions at the plant that turns out everything from steaks to tallow for glue. Although represented by the Teamsters, the workers walked out on their own Friday after managers allegedly refused to slow down the assembly production line. A strike vote called later by the Teamsters was approved and sanctioned Wednesday.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1998 | Reuters
IBP Inc. said it is voluntarily recalling all ground beef produced at its Dakota City, Neb., plant on Oct. 22 because a sample might have contained the deadly bacteria E. coli 0157:H7. The company said the recall involves 556,226 pounds of ground beef, much of which is believed to have already been consumed, that was shipped to 33 states, including California. IBP said its officials know of no illnesses associated with the beef produced on that day.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1998 | Bloomberg News
IBP Inc., the world's largest meatpacker, must pay about $200,000 to 16 employees for making them work during their unpaid lunch breaks, the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans ruled. The court said the maintenance workers are entitled to damages awarded by a Texas jury because IBP interrupted their 30-minute breaks to fix machinery at an Amarillo, Texas, beef-processing plant.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1998 | Bloomberg News
The Labor Department is suing IBP Inc., accusing the meat packing company of not paying more than 20,000 employees for work performed before and after their regular shifts in 12 plants since 1994. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Kansas City, Kan., seeks to recover back wages totaling about $8 million under the Fair Labor Standards Act. In October, an appeals court held that Dakota City, Neb.-based IBP had to pay $4.5 million in back wages and more than $2.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
One of the nation's largest meat processors, IBP Inc., on Wednesday said it agreed to buy Hudson Foods Inc.'s state-of-the-art beef-processing plant in Columbus, Neb., the focus of a recent massive recall of ground beef linked to possible E. coli contamination. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Since the recall, meatpacking trade groups are pushing the industry to change hamburger-processing methods and abandon the common practice of mixing in one day's leftovers with the next day's supply.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1997 | Reuters
Giant meat processor IBP Inc., seeking to tap into the growing market for foods prepared away from home, said it agreed to acquire Foodbrands America Inc., a food service supplier, for $640 million. IBP, based in Dakota City, Neb., said it offered to pay $23.40 a share for a total of $292 million in cash and to assume about $348 million in Foodbrands' debt. IBP is the nation's largest meatpacker.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1988 | From the Washington Post
IBP Inc., one of the nation's largest meatpackers, bowed to federal pressure Tuesday night and agreed to completely redesign the jobs in all its meatpacking plants in an effort to eliminate crippling injuries caused by repetitive motions. Union officials called the safety agreement a major breakthrough and said they planned to use it as a pattern for improving safety conditions at the nation's meatpacking businesses, which have the highest injury rate of any American industry.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1988 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
The federal government took aim again Wednesday at meatpacker IBP Inc., proposing a $3.1-million fine for allegedly ignoring a "serious health hazard" that disabled more than 600 workers in its Dakota City, Neb., plant. It is the second-largest penalty ever proposed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. OSHA said the action marks a stepped-up effort by the agency to combat an occupational illness called cumulative trauma disorder.
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