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Ibuprofen Drug

SPORTS
August 12, 1990 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are the agonizing days Kenny Easley had hoped would never come. "You wake up hurting, you go through the day hurting, you go to bed hurting and you wake up the next morning and you're still hurting," he said. "It seems like it never goes away. It gets to be very disheartening and very frustrating." His suffering is the result of a June 8 kidney transplant in Seattle, where for seven years Easley was an outstanding safety for the Seahawks.
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SPORTS
August 12, 1990 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filed away in the vast, sterile Rockville, Md., complex of the Food and Drug Administration are reams of physician reports on the effects of drugs. They are stored in cabinets or on computer disks. These are the Form 1639s, Adverse Reaction Reports. They are perhaps the most detailed evidence available about the hazards of pharmaceuticals, from aspirin to zinc oxide. One area is reserved for products that have ibuprofen, a painkiller categorized as a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Makers of ibuprofen medicines disputed conclusions of medical experts who claim a 12-patient study by doctors from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore indicates over-the-counter doses of the painkiller may cause kidney failure in high-risk people. The study was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Over-the-counter doses of the popular pain reliever ibuprofen can cause kidney failure in people with mild kidney disease, according to a group of medical researchers. The three-year study on the drug by researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore is detailed in the latest issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.
SPORTS
April 21, 1989
Kenny Easley, former Seattle Seahawks safety, has sued the National Football League team, claiming that he was allowed to play through the 1987 season without being told he had an irreversible kidney ailment that eventually ended his career. Easley's suit alleges that his kidneys were ruined by large doses of ibuprofen, a pain reliever. The 30-year-old former All-Pro undergoes dialysis three times a week. Easley's seven-year career ended last year after the kidney ailment was diagnosed.
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