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BUSINESS
April 12, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
If you were scrambling to get your application in to meet today's deadline to get what amounts to an online vanity plate to replace ".com" in your business' Web address, you can relax a little. A system glitch has granted you an extension.  Today, 839 participants were to have their applications in to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, but ICANN discovered a technical issue with its top-level domain application system, or TAS. "ICANN is taking the most conservative approach possible to protect all applicants and allow adequate time to resolve the issue.
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BUSINESS
January 23, 2014 | By Andrea Chang
On the Internet, .com is about to get some more company. Seven new Web domains including .bike, .guru and .clothing are scheduled to be released Wednesday, the first of hundreds of online address extensions expected to become available over the next few years. The rollout is being called one of the biggest changes to ever hit the Internet as companies and individuals gain access to a wider variety of domains that could better reflect their business type or the products they sell.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Too bad ICANN didn't register .D'oh or .TMI itself. In the second recent big glitch in the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers' process to expand domains beyond the era of .com, the domain name administrator inadvertently revealed a little too much information when it posted details about the previously secret names submitted. The information online included the mailing addresses and contact information of some applicants, details that were to remain private.
WORLD
May 3, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Google has switched the tagline on its Palestinian website, replacing the words “Palestinian territories” with “Palestine” in both English and Arabic. Google spokesman Nathan Tyler said the company consulted "a number of sources and authorities when naming countries" and was following the lead of organizations such as the United Nations, the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers and the International Organization for Standardization. "We're changing the name 'Palestinian Territories' to 'Palestine' across our products,” Tyler said in a statement emailed to the Los Angeles Times.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Some of the next steps as .com makes room for a flurry of new generic domains such as .baby, .Lexus, .AARP will make you scratch your head. The question of how to pick which applications get first consideration will be settled by jumping through a set of hoops in an little bit of online Olympics. The event to figure who gets first dibs: "digital archery. " It all actually sounds more like something out of a game show than a formal business application process. Ultimately, the fastest clickers will get placed in the first group to be officially reviewed.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Move over, dot-com — get ready for dot-anything. The group that governs Internet domain names is opening up the system so that companies and organizations can apply to create their own versions of .com, .org or .gov. Under the new rules, instead of a coke.com, Coca-Cola might control the domain .coke and assign Web addresses such as drink.coke or bottle.coke. The Marina del Rey group known as ICANN called it "one of the biggest changes ever" to the way the Internet's naming system works.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2009 | Dan Fost
It sounds almost silly to say it, but the Internet is going global. Of course, it's already global. But the underlying technology that makes the Internet run was developed by the Department of Defense 40 years ago, and the federal government continued to have an outsized voice in how the Internet was run. Eleven years ago, as the Internet took off, the U.S. turned over some of its governance to an obscure nonprofit group, the Internet Corp....
BUSINESS
January 23, 2014 | By Andrea Chang
On the Internet, .com is about to get some more company. Seven new Web domains including .bike, .guru and .clothing are scheduled to be released Wednesday, the first of hundreds of online address extensions expected to become available over the next few years. The rollout is being called one of the biggest changes to ever hit the Internet as companies and individuals gain access to a wider variety of domains that could better reflect their business type or the products they sell.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Faced with opposition from conservative groups and some pornography websites, the Internet's key oversight agency voted Wednesday to reject a proposal to create a red-light district on the Internet. The decision from the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers reverses its preliminary approval last June to create a dot-xxx domain name for voluntary use by the adult entertainment industry.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Google hopes to inherit the Earth -- or at least .earth. And Amazon wants to bring you .joy. It's probably no surprise that they both want .you. Those were among the 1,930 applications for new generic top-level domain names, replacing the ubiquitous .com that we see on most commercial websites in an online land-grab that could be the largest expansion of the Internet's domain-name system. Many of the applications are to be expected. Companies including ABC television, BMW and Yahoo staked their claim on their names.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2012 | By Ryan Faughnder, Los Angeles Times
Forget .love and .joy. For now, it's only .wait. A closely watched effort to broaden Internet suffixes to include common names and words such as .google, .love and .car has been put on hold, leaving the hundreds of applicants who paid up to $185,000 for an extension in a lurch. The Marina del Rey organization that decides how Internet addresses are determined has suspended the selection process "pending further analysis," marking another setback for a plan to expand the suffixes beyond the ubiquitous .com, .edu, and .org.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Of the 1,930 new domain names submitted to ICANN recently, who had the most applications? Was it Amazon with 76? Not even close. How about Google with 101? Nope. Actually, that'd be Donuts with 307 submissions from .app to .sucks. The group beat out behemoth Google for most submissions by more than a factor of three. They've staked their claim for domains such as .basketball, .shop, .computer and .film.  "We're very happy chaps at the moment," Donuts co-founder Dan Schindler told The Times in an interview from the company's Los Angeles office.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Too bad ICANN didn't register .D'oh or .TMI itself. In the second recent big glitch in the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers' process to expand domains beyond the era of .com, the domain name administrator inadvertently revealed a little too much information when it posted details about the previously secret names submitted. The information online included the mailing addresses and contact information of some applicants, details that were to remain private.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Some of the next steps as .com makes room for a flurry of new generic domains such as .baby, .Lexus, .AARP will make you scratch your head. The question of how to pick which applications get first consideration will be settled by jumping through a set of hoops in an little bit of online Olympics. The event to figure who gets first dibs: "digital archery. " It all actually sounds more like something out of a game show than a formal business application process. Ultimately, the fastest clickers will get placed in the first group to be officially reviewed.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Google hopes to inherit the Earth -- or at least .earth. And Amazon wants to bring you .joy. It's probably no surprise that they both want .you. Those were among the 1,930 applications for new generic top-level domain names, replacing the ubiquitous .com that we see on most commercial websites in an online land-grab that could be the largest expansion of the Internet's domain-name system. Many of the applications are to be expected. Companies including ABC television, BMW and Yahoo staked their claim on their names.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has applied for more than 50 top-level domains that include obvious choices like .google and .youtube while also including other, more interesting choices such as a .lol domain. Google applied for TLDs in four general categories that include its trademarks, words related to its business, like .doc, domains that will improve user experience, and others that it thinks have interesting and creative potential, which is where the .lol came in. With Google applying for more than 50 TLDs, according to Ad Age, and each application costing $185,000, that means the company spent more than $9 million on domains.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2012 | By Ryan Faughnder, Los Angeles Times
Forget .love and .joy. For now, it's only .wait. A closely watched effort to broaden Internet suffixes to include common names and words such as .google, .love and .car has been put on hold, leaving the hundreds of applicants who paid up to $185,000 for an extension in a lurch. The Marina del Rey organization that decides how Internet addresses are determined has suspended the selection process "pending further analysis," marking another setback for a plan to expand the suffixes beyond the ubiquitous .com, .edu, and .org.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2001 | From Reuters
The Internet's top naming authority on Monday modified VeriSign Inc.'s control over domain name suffixes but allowed it to keep its thumb on .com and .net for decades if it follows the rules. The Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, limited the term of VeriSign's rights to the .org name to the end of 2002 but gave it the chance to keep the .com suffix after its agreement expires and to contend for the .net name after its control ends in 2006. Mountain View, Calif.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
If you were scrambling to get your application in to meet today's deadline to get what amounts to an online vanity plate to replace ".com" in your business' Web address, you can relax a little. A system glitch has granted you an extension.  Today, 839 participants were to have their applications in to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, but ICANN discovered a technical issue with its top-level domain application system, or TAS. "ICANN is taking the most conservative approach possible to protect all applicants and allow adequate time to resolve the issue.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Here's your mad-about-you Monday roundup of consumer news from around the Web: --Wal-Mart wants you to pay your taxes. And to help, free preparation of simple tax forms will be made available at more than 3,000 Wal-Mart Stores nationwide. The nation's largest retailer has contracted with the top two tax prep companies, H&R Block and Jackson-Hewitt Tax Service, to set up kiosks inside its stores where customers can have their tax returns completed by trained preparers.
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