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July 14, 2000 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Kirk Wood Bromley gets points for sheer eccentricity--he writes full-length dramas entirely in verse. His "Icarus and Aria," at Sacred Fools Theater, is a loose updating of "Romeo and Juliet." The play concerns the doomed romance between Aria (Kim Jackson), the privileged daughter of a wealthy football team owner, and Icarus (Matthew Troyer), a Latino football star from the 'hood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Icarus flew too close to the sun. When the wax of his homemade wings melted, he fell to the sea and died. At least that's what the ancient Greek story says. At first glance, this tale might scare aspiring trapeze artists and others away from the Circus of the Sun. Think again. The legend of Icarus is the narrative engine for Cirque du Soleil's latest and typically magnificent touring extravaganza, "Varekai," which is parked outside Staples Center, to be followed by similar stays at the L.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Icarus flew too close to the sun. When the wax of his homemade wings melted, he fell to the sea and died. At least that's what the ancient Greek story says. At first glance, this tale might scare aspiring trapeze artists and others away from the Circus of the Sun. Think again. The legend of Icarus is the narrative engine for Cirque du Soleil's latest and typically magnificent touring extravaganza, "Varekai," which is parked outside Staples Center, to be followed by similar stays at the L.A.
BOOKS
January 14, 2001 | BENJAMIN KUNKEL, Benjamin Kunkel is a writer who contributes to several publications, including The Nation and The Village Voice
James Salter's new novel about a doomed or unlucky young pilot does what none of its characters can: It performs a rescue mission and healingly alters the past. "Cassada," Salter's sixth novel, was also his second, "The Arm of Flesh," "published," the author says, "in 1961 and largely a failure." "The Arm of Flesh" flashed across the sky, turned a few critics' heads and vanished. It has never been reprinted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1990
I am certainly not the only one who finds offense not in the nudity of Icarus, but in the symbol of Icarus. How could anyone choose as the patron for an airport an immature god who through pilot error causes his wings to fall off and crashes! How about Pegasus instead? Who could be offended by a nude horse? And it flies! DALE O'NEAL Laguna Beach
MAGAZINE
June 12, 1988 | DAVID LASKER
DOUBTLESS, Thomas Edison would be amused. Originally, lamps were simply objects to be used for reading in the dark. Then the Italians transformed them into gorgeous pieces of sculpture. Now, many contemporary high-design Italian lamps look shriveled and anorexic. The lamps themselves, however, are only half the story. Their dramatic shadow projections also serve as ornaments.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | JOSEPH N. BELL
It's a real joy to see that we finally found a problem with the new terminal at John Wayne Airport that is worthy of Orange County. I mean, all this blather about running millions of dollars over budget and opening almost six months late got pretty boring. It took a long time, but at last we stumbled into the area of morality, which we do--and I say this in all modesty and will defend our position stoutly--better than any other place in the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1989 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Ah, the male nude. From the classic proportions of Greek sculpture, to the gathering power of Michelangelo's "David," to the amputees and dwarfs by contemporary photographer George Dureau, the male figure has been portrayed variously by artists throughout history. At the Photowest Gallery downtown, the more decorative aspects of form prevail in an exhibit of 42 images by San Diego photographers David Eliot and Jeff Palmer. Called "Interpretations of the Male Nude," the exhibit of black and white photographs might also be titled "Formal and Sensuous" or "Warm and Cool."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1998 | JULIET JOHNSON, Juliet Johnson is a visiting assistant professor at Dartmouth College and is author of a forthcoming book on Russian banks
The emerging conventional wisdom that the West must bail out Russia's collapsing financial system to stave off fascism has it exactly backward. The current banking crisis presents Russia with its best--and perhaps last--opportunity to check the power of the parasitic financial-industrial oligarchy that has persistently retarded Russia's political and economic development.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1990 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials overseeing an art program at John Wayne Airport will hold an "emergency meeting" today to decide whether to print a poster commemorating the opening of the facility's new terminal. A printer who volunteered to produce the poster for free has objected to nudity in the artwork. Bob Cashman, owner of Hallmark Litho Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2000 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Kirk Wood Bromley gets points for sheer eccentricity--he writes full-length dramas entirely in verse. His "Icarus and Aria," at Sacred Fools Theater, is a loose updating of "Romeo and Juliet." The play concerns the doomed romance between Aria (Kim Jackson), the privileged daughter of a wealthy football team owner, and Icarus (Matthew Troyer), a Latino football star from the 'hood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1998 | JULIET JOHNSON, Juliet Johnson is a visiting assistant professor at Dartmouth College and is author of a forthcoming book on Russian banks
The emerging conventional wisdom that the West must bail out Russia's collapsing financial system to stave off fascism has it exactly backward. The current banking crisis presents Russia with its best--and perhaps last--opportunity to check the power of the parasitic financial-industrial oligarchy that has persistently retarded Russia's political and economic development.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1990 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Morphesis' controversial painting "Winged Figure" will be donated to the Laguna Art Museum by a longtime museum trustee who agreed Tuesday to buy the work from the New York artist for an undisclosed amount. "Winged Figure" is the Icarus-themed painting of a nude male torso commissioned for a poster that was to commemorate the opening of the new terminal at John Wayne Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1990
In reference to airport art at John Wayne: Zeus must be shaking with Olympian laughter at the man who is perturbed by the "nudity" of the classic figure of Icarus and believes that a picture of an airplane is preferable to the mythological symbol for flight. I am surprised that no one objects to the use of Icarus, who fell to earth after flying too close to the sun! Shakespeare had a line for all this: "What fools these mortals be." Too bad they are deciding what is fit for public consumption.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | JOSEPH N. BELL
It's a real joy to see that we finally found a problem with the new terminal at John Wayne Airport that is worthy of Orange County. I mean, all this blather about running millions of dollars over budget and opening almost six months late got pretty boring. It took a long time, but at last we stumbled into the area of morality, which we do--and I say this in all modesty and will defend our position stoutly--better than any other place in the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1990 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials overseeing an art program at John Wayne Airport will hold an "emergency meeting" today to decide whether to print a poster commemorating the opening of the facility's new terminal. A printer who volunteered to produce the poster for free has objected to nudity in the artwork. Bob Cashman, owner of Hallmark Litho Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1985 | MATT DAMSKER
Eric Clapton, truly the cream of Britain's '60s guitar heroes, won't be caught dead making any waves. For a decade, Clapton has exhibited nothing but grand-old-bluesman class and dignity, none of the paisleyed flash of his salad days. Now comes another Clapton album, rife with more cautiously updated bluesiness--serious, rootsy, real .
MAGAZINE
June 12, 1988 | DAVID LASKER
DOUBTLESS, Thomas Edison would be amused. Originally, lamps were simply objects to be used for reading in the dark. Then the Italians transformed them into gorgeous pieces of sculpture. Now, many contemporary high-design Italian lamps look shriveled and anorexic. The lamps themselves, however, are only half the story. Their dramatic shadow projections also serve as ornaments.
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