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OPINION
February 26, 2006 | Joel Pett
OK, so the Winter Olympics are losing the cross-country channel-surfing race to "American Idol." Ice dancing, women's bobsledding, curling and the rest may not be getting their props from the viewing public, but they make ideal cartoon props. Not quite compulsory, and certainly not executed with high degrees of conceptual difficulty, these cartoons won't win us any Pulitzer medals or spark any worldwide riots, but hey, they're good, clean funny!
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Ice Capades star Donna Atwood had spent almost half her life on the road when she left professional figure-skating behind at 31 to raise her three young children in a custom-built Beverly Hills home complete with a piano that folded into the wall. She was so famous that Times headlines from the era used only her first name. "Donna to Retire in 1956 for Home Life," said one atop an article that portrayed her as longing to "trade it all in for 'home, sweet home.' " Yet it was a bittersweet decision for both Atwood and her husband, John H. Harris, operating owner of the touring Ice Capades show.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1995
What's the hottest thing on ice since Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan? The American flag. Most of the fuss surrounding the Stars and Stripes usually involves burning it in protest, but one Venice community activist has taken the opposite approach: freezing Old Glory. Jerry Rubin's dime-store flag hit the ice as a protest June 28, the day the House of Representatives approved a constitutional amendment that would give Congress and the states the authority to ban desecration of the U.S. flag.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2010 | Bloomberg News
John Kluge, a billionaire entrepreneur and pioneer in independent television-station ownership whose Metromedia Inc. stations formed the basis for News Corp.'s Fox network, has died. He was 95. Kluge died Tuesday at his home in Albemarle County, Va., said University of Virginia spokeswoman Marian Anderfuren, who gave no cause of death. Kluge donated more than $63 million to the university during his lifetime, including his Albemarle estate, which was valued at more than $45 million in 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Ice Capades star Donna Atwood had spent almost half her life on the road when she left professional figure-skating behind at 31 to raise her three young children in a custom-built Beverly Hills home complete with a piano that folded into the wall. She was so famous that Times headlines from the era used only her first name. "Donna to Retire in 1956 for Home Life," said one atop an article that portrayed her as longing to "trade it all in for 'home, sweet home.' " Yet it was a bittersweet decision for both Atwood and her husband, John H. Harris, operating owner of the touring Ice Capades show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001
Freddie Trenkler, 88, the diminutive comic ice skater famous for his pratfalls in the Ice Capades and other shows over four decades, died May 21 in Canoga Park. Born in Vienna, Trenkler trained as a serious ice skater but preferred making people laugh. So he dressed in rags and a battered hat and perfected slips, stumbles and arm-waving recoveries. Because of the many ways he could fall--or almost fall--he came to be billed as the Bouncing Ball of the Ice.
SPORTS
November 18, 1988 | JEFF MEYERS, Times Staff Writer
Turning professional in most sports is usually a step up in status. Not so for figure skaters. Figure skaters don't play in a league or get drafted by a team. They join the Ice Capades and immediately get banished from the sports world. Branded as performers , they lose their identity as athletes and get lumped in the same show-business category as circus clowns, trained seals and opera singers. "That's not fair," says Karen Yablon, 23.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
It had to have been difficult for Angelique Gandy-Doud to realize, at age 8, that the hard, frigid substance she kept collapsing on--the stuff that was responsible for sending her home soaking wet--would one day be a source of income, fame and a husband. "I remember falling down and getting wet a lot, " said Gandy-Doud of her first trip to Anaheim's Glacier Falls ice rink. "But I liked it. I had a great time. I started taking group lessons right after that."
BUSINESS
March 5, 1986 | NANCY RIVERA, Times Staff Writer
The Harlem Globetrotters and the performers of the Ice Capades may soon be dribbling and skating for new owners. Metromedia Inc. said Tuesday that it has reached an agreement in principle to sell Harlem Globetrotters Inc., Ice Capades Inc. and 15 Ice Chalet skating rinks to International Broadcasting Corp. of Minneapolis for $30 million. The sale is subject to completion of financing and regulatory approvals.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, Corinne Flocken is a free-lance writer who regularly covers Kid Stuff for The Times Orange County Edition.
Yet another Ice Capades show glided into town this week, but don't let its title mislead you. According to its star, American figure-skating icon Dorothy Hamill, "Cinderella . . . Frozen in Time" is anything but a blast from Ice Capades past. The variety show format is gone, the casts are smaller and more highly skilled, and the whole shebang is packaged by a design team that includes some of the top names in the world of theater, dance and ice. There's also a new owner calling the shots.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2007
WHAT a great piece on ballerina Gelsey Kirkland, starring in the new staging of "The Sleeping Beauty" ["Return of the Lost Ballerina," July 15]. Her exceptional tell-all book, "Dancing on My Grave," was a must-read backstage among us chorus boys and showgirls in Ice Capades as the same extremes about weight and appearance were placed upon us as well as Las Vegas dancers.
OPINION
February 26, 2006 | Joel Pett
OK, so the Winter Olympics are losing the cross-country channel-surfing race to "American Idol." Ice dancing, women's bobsledding, curling and the rest may not be getting their props from the viewing public, but they make ideal cartoon props. Not quite compulsory, and certainly not executed with high degrees of conceptual difficulty, these cartoons won't win us any Pulitzer medals or spark any worldwide riots, but hey, they're good, clean funny!
SPORTS
June 9, 2004 | Larry Stewart
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, played, heard, observed, worn, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. One exception: No products will be endorsed. * What: "NBA Hardwood Classics: The Player and the Coach." Where: History Channel, Friday, 8 p.m.
NEWS
January 8, 2004 | Brenda Rees, Special to The Times
Tom DICKSON knew he wanted to be a figure skater when he saw the spinning cheese wedges. Growing up in Newport Beach, Dickson frequently vacationed with his family in Sun Valley, Idaho, where they would see elaborate ice shows. He was mesmerized. "I remember watching a segment that involved giant skating Swiss cheese wedges," he says, adding that a mouse figured into the scenario too. "I told my parents that's what I wanted to do."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001
Freddie Trenkler, 88, the diminutive comic ice skater famous for his pratfalls in the Ice Capades and other shows over four decades, died May 21 in Canoga Park. Born in Vienna, Trenkler trained as a serious ice skater but preferred making people laugh. So he dressed in rags and a battered hat and perfected slips, stumbles and arm-waving recoveries. Because of the many ways he could fall--or almost fall--he came to be billed as the Bouncing Ball of the Ice.
SPORTS
January 17, 2001 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scott Hamilton will miss the friends he made in 15 years of touring with Stars on Ice, the show he co-founded and nurtured, and the friends he made during more than 30 years of figure skating. But after the four-time U.S. and world champion and 1984 Olympic gold medalist does his last back flip and skates off the ice April 7, he will most miss the little moments that wove the tapestry of his life. "I'll miss the goofy stuff, the stuff behind the scenes," he said.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | LIBBY SLATE
As an ice skating champion, Tai Babilonia is no stranger to TV cameras. Her amateur accomplishments with partner Randy Gardner-including the 1976-80 U.S. Pair titles and the 1979 World Crown-were chronicled by ABC Sports. The team's last-minute withdrawal from the 1980 Winter Olympics, due to Gardner's groin injury, was broadcast internationally. As professionals, the duo has not only skated on TV, but has had roles in "Hart to Hart" and other series.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2000 | LIBBY SLATE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Several generations of figure skating's elite will be in the spotlights Sunday afternoon when the "Champions on Ice Summer Tour" glides into Anaheim. The 32 singles and pair skaters and ice dancers range in age from 43-year-old 1976 Olympic Champion Dorothy Hamill to Costa Mesa-based new-kids-on-the-ice Sasha Cohen, 15, the current U.S. silver medalist, and Naomi Nari Nam, 14, last year's national silver medalist. Also on the roster are such luminaries as current World and U.S.
SPORTS
August 14, 1998 | TRIS WYKES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her line of work, it's not prudent for Jamie Lee Curtis to risk life and limb away from the set. The actress' body is not only the subject of various industry insurance policies, but when making a movie, she is often required to sign waivers pledging not to engage in dangerous forms of sport.
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