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FOOD
August 29, 2007 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
These tartlets may be small in diameter, but they're big on deliciousness. Roasted walnuts are nestled into a creamy praline filling and baked in a crisp, chocolate sablé crust. As if that's not enough, they're served with rich, homemade espresso ice cream. Times test kitchen director Donna Deane raved about this dessert after a recent evening at Hatfield's in Los Angeles. "The chocolate in the crust with the praline filling is a great match," she said. "The ice cream is well worth the extra time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2013 | By Elizabeth Hand
The protagonist of J.M. Sidorova's ambitious first novel, "The Age of Ice," is conceived in extremity during the reign of the cruel and impulsive Russian Empress Ionaovna. Captivated by the antics of her court fool, a humpbacked woman, the Empress commands that she marry a disgraced Russian prince. This "jester wedding" takes place during the brutal winter of 1739, and the miserable couple consummate their union in an ice palace constructed by the Empress' slaves, in "a wedding chamber, a canopy bed on a dais, with heavy drapes half drawn, cascading to the floor - all made of ice. " Nine months later, the unfortunate fool dies in childbirth, leaving twin sons, Prince Alexander Velitzyn and his brother Andrei.
SPORTS
December 11, 2010 | By Kevin Baxter, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
It's no secret that Los Angeles can be a tough sell for NHL free agents looking for a place to play. And that confounds defenseman Rob Scuderi. "For the life of me, I can't understand why," says Scuderi, who left Pittsburgh for Los Angeles, signing a four-year $13.6-million contract with the Kings after winning a Stanley Cup two seasons ago. "I could understand if the team was trending down. But I think the team is on its way up. It's a beautiful place to live. The facilities are top of the line.
SCIENCE
September 8, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Arctic ice cap is melting faster than scientists had expected and will shrink 40% by 2050 in most regions, with grim consequences for polar bears, walruses and other marine animals, according to government researchers. The Arctic sea ice will retreat hundreds of miles further from the coast of Alaska in the summer, the scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1997
I recently read your editorial "The Scoop on Ice Cream Trucks" (Nov. 9) concerning the ice cream truck vendor noise issues. You seem to be sympathetic to the vendors and implied that the noise is trivial. Unfortunately, my wife and I live in a middle-class neighborhood that is frequently visited by these vendors, especially on Saturday and Sunday between the hours of 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. Several different vendors repeatedly will circle the neighborhood blaring their annoying jingles.
SPORTS
February 14, 2010 | By Philip Hersh
Olympic pairs competition begins with a bang Sunday. Two-time Olympic bronze medalists Shen Xue and Zhao Hongbo are the first team on the ice in the short program. The Chinese, ancient mariners (he is 36, she is 31), have not competed in a major international event since winning the 2007 world title. "To win an Olympic gold medal is a lifelong dream for both of us," Zhao said. They retired for two seasons, got married, then returned at the brilliant level that had made them one of the world's most dynamic pairs since they debuted with a fifth place at the 1998 Winter Games in Nagano, Japan.
NEWS
March 14, 1996 | Reuters
Sheets of ice, some the size of car windshields, fell from the cables of the George Washington Bridge on Wednesday, shutting the span's upper level. Traffic backed up for miles on the New York and New Jersey sides of the bridge over the Hudson River. The eight-lane upper deck was closed during the morning as temperatures neared the 50s, loosening slabs of ice that formed during a weekend storm.
SCIENCE
January 28, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A team of Japanese researchers drilling on Antarctica has recovered what is believed to be the oldest sample of ice -- possibly dating back 1 million years, officials said Tuesday. The ice sample was taken from a depth of 9,994 feet in the Antarctic ice sheet near the Japanese camp at Fuji Dome, said Yuji Umezaki, an official with the education and science ministry.
SCIENCE
September 22, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Arctic sea ice melted to its lowest level ever this week, shattering a record set in 2005 and continuing a trend spurred by human-caused global warming, the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center in Colorado said Thursday. Compared to 2005, the previous record-low year for Arctic sea ice, this year has had a decrease of more than 386,100 square miles. The ice hit its lowest level Sunday, and refreezing has already begun in some places, according to satellite imagery used by the center.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Forest Service, the agency with jurisdiction over Convict Lake, has set no standards for ice thickness, air temperature or other conditions to be met before the public is allowed to venture onto the frozen lake, a spokesman for the Forest Service said Tuesday.
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