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Iced Tea

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BUSINESS
July 30, 1992
Forget the cola wars. The next big battle brewing in the soft drink industry is over bottled and canned iced tea. Several beverage makers, including heavyweights like Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola, are flooding grocery shelves this summer with ready-to-drink iced teas to capture what could be a key growth market for the $47-billion-a-year soft drink industry.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2012 | Sandy Banks
It's an outrage even if you look past race - even if Florida vigilante George Zimmerman does claim a Latino mother and a few black friends. Zimmerman's ethnicity can't excuse the killing of Trayvon Martin . And it doesn't obliterate the racial slur that Zimmerman muttered on the 911 tape as he chased down the black teenager. The case has roiled the Orlando, Fla., suburb where Trayvon was shot to death last month by Zimmerman, a Neighborhood Watch leader who became alarmed when he spotted Trayvon walking through the gated condominium complex that Zimmerman spent aimless days and nights patrolling.
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FOOD
July 18, 2001 | Donna Deane
No need to boil water to brew iced tea. With Lipton's new Cold Brew, you can make a glass of iced tea in two to three minutes. Just put a tea bag in cold water and let it stand. Add a few ice cubes and a squeeze of lemon or lime and you'll have a quick alternative to the usual sodas. Use them to make tea at work, on picnics or when camping. 3.5-ounce box of 44 glass-size tea bags and 4.8-ounce box of 22 pitcher-size tea bags, both $2.
NEWS
July 15, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
A teaspoon is a teaspoon is a teaspoon … right? Not exactly, as researchers tested several household spoons used to give medicine, finding wide variations in capacity. The study took place in Attica, Greece, where 25 women allowed their teaspoons (71 total) and tablespoons (49 total) to be measured. A standard teaspoon measure is about 5 milliliters, and a tablespoon is about 14.9 milliliters. The teaspoons the researchers collected had capacities ranging from 2.5 ml to 7.3 ml. The volume of the various tablespoons ranged from 6.7 ml to 13.4 ml. Some homes had a variety of spoons with different volumes.
FOOD
August 9, 2000 | ERICA MARCUS, NEWSDAY
After water, tea is the most consumed beverage in the world. Yet it is only in America that tea is served over ice. The hot climate of the South--where the vast majority of the country's tea is consumed--may partially explain our preference for iced tea, but consider that the world's greatest tea drinkers, the British, never stopped drinking their tea hot, even when they presided over their exceedingly tropical colony, India.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
McDonald's Corp. said it would start selling sweetened iced tea, smoothies and bottled beverages to build on U.S. sales gains from specialty coffees. The addition of the new beverages in the next two years would increase annual sales by $125,000 a restaurant, Donald Thompson, McDonald's U.S. chief, said during a meeting with analysts. Average revenue per restaurant is $2.2 million a year. "We call our iced-tea business money in a cup," Karen King, eastern U.S.
MAGAZINE
January 16, 1994 | Chuck Taggart
It began, for me, like this: As I nearly always do when dining out, I ordered an iced tea. The waiter brought it to me and I took a hearty gulp. It nearly came back up. "Waiter," I said, beckoning. "Excuse me, but there's something wrong with this tea. It tastes like something got into it. May I have another one?" "Oh, I'm terribly sorry, sir. Certainly." But the next one was no better. The taste was, I came to find out, intentional.
FOOD
July 25, 2001 | MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I was a tea drinker long before I met my Irish husband, but after I met him a morning pot of strong tea became an established ritual in our home. Darjeeling is my brew of choice, and I always make a big, full pot of it, even if we have only enough time for one cup before we're out the door. I know I'll finish it off before the day is out. This is especially true in summer, when I use what's left of my morning tea for iced tea.
FOOD
June 30, 1994 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tea is absurdly easy to make, so why do so many of us buy bottled iced tea? Well, maybe we're somewhere (such as work) where we can't make it. Maybe we're home, but at this time of year we can't bear to turn on a burner, boil water, stand around while the tea steeps and then wait for it to chill. Maybe the idea just sounds good when we want a soft drink that isn't as sweet as a soda. It's true, sweetened tea generally has about half the calories per ounce of a non-diet cola.
HEALTH
October 7, 2002 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: I am having trouble getting insurance and suspect my prescription for Luvox, which I take for trichotillomania, might be to blame. It's usually prescribed for psychological problems. Is there a non-drug treatment for my compulsion to pull my hair so I can stop taking Luvox? Answer: People who suffer from trichotillomania have an uncontrollable urge to pull out their hair, sometimes leaving bald spots. Luvox belongs to the same category of drugs as Prozac and Zoloft.
SPORTS
October 6, 2009 | BILL DWYRE
If you play golf, watch it on TV, think you might take it up someday, or have hit a ball under a windmill and through a clown's mouth, there was no better place to be on a sparkling clear Saturday morning in Southern California. The King was in town. The golfer who never had a gallery, always an Army, was in the house. Arnold Palmer got out of a car, hitched up his pants and walked into the courtyard at the Rolling Hills Country Club like somebody about to shop for a new putter.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
McDonald's Corp. said it would start selling sweetened iced tea, smoothies and bottled beverages to build on U.S. sales gains from specialty coffees. The addition of the new beverages in the next two years would increase annual sales by $125,000 a restaurant, Donald Thompson, McDonald's U.S. chief, said during a meeting with analysts. Average revenue per restaurant is $2.2 million a year. "We call our iced-tea business money in a cup," Karen King, eastern U.S.
OPINION
August 14, 2006 | Tom Standage, TOM STANDAGE, author of "A History of the World in Six Glasses," is the business editor of the Economist.
IT'S TEA TIME. Nearly half the U.S. population drinks tea in some form; iced tea accounts for 85% of consumption. Tea sales are booming -- from $1.8 billion in 1990 to more than $6 billion in 2005, according to the Tea Assn. of the USA. Even Starbucks offers tea-based frappuccinos. Americans' newfound enthusiasm for tea may strike some people as strange. An important step on the road to independence was, after all, the ritual shunning of tea that took place at the Boston Tea Party in 1773.
HOME & GARDEN
June 16, 2005 | David A. Keeps and Adamo DiGregorio, Special to The Times
Paper or plastic? Between those Chinet divided plates and those goblets with detachable bases, the alfresco table used to be a crashing bore. Now, shatterproof is chic. Acrylic barware in a lemonade hue and water-colored mosaics and swirls look light but stand sturdy.
HEALTH
October 7, 2002 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: I am having trouble getting insurance and suspect my prescription for Luvox, which I take for trichotillomania, might be to blame. It's usually prescribed for psychological problems. Is there a non-drug treatment for my compulsion to pull my hair so I can stop taking Luvox? Answer: People who suffer from trichotillomania have an uncontrollable urge to pull out their hair, sometimes leaving bald spots. Luvox belongs to the same category of drugs as Prozac and Zoloft.
OPINION
September 26, 2002
After reading "Europe's Food Regions Fight to Keep Their Good Names" (Sept. 16), I shared in Andrea Bonati's outrage that some cheeses not made in Parma, Italy, are nevertheless called "parmesan." After all, how could a non-Parma parmesan ever hope to capture that je ne sais quoi that defines the original? (I hear it's the breeze that makes the cheese.) Lest your readers get the impression that such cultural crimes are only perpetrated against Europeans, allow me to relate two tales from a recent trip to France.
FOOD
May 20, 1998 | CHARLES PERRY
Shandies are mild punches based on beer. The original shandy was beer cut with ginger ale, but these days lemonade versions seem to be more popular. The name "shandy" is short for shandygaff, a word of unknown but vaguely nautical-sounding origin. A nonalcoholic equivalent of the shandy, made with lemonade and tea (keeping the layers separate, if possible), is named for the famous golfer Arnold Palmer. The A.P is, if you'll pardon the expression, a tee-totaler's (or even a tea-totaler's) shandy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1997 | MICHELE HUNEVEN
The classic cool-down with some glamorous new variations: * Seattle's Best Coffee: This small coffeehouse chain offers an iced chai latte--that is, a traditional Indian-spiced black tea with milk. It also offers regular iced tea and a refreshing black mint tea. All of the other teas for sale, including herbal varieties, can be brewed and iced to order. (Iced tea, $1.05; iced chai latte, $2.50-$3.20.) Seattle's Best Coffee, 12222 Wilshire Blvd., (310) 442-1031; 1015 Montana Ave.
OPINION
September 7, 2002
Cardinal Roger Mahony now has the rare opportunity to make the new Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels the most important attraction in all of Los Angeles. Now that the pageantry and the formalities are over, along with the elitism that accompanied the opening ceremonies, it is time to turn the cathedral over to the ordinary people to whom it rightly belongs. One should look to those cathedrals that draw thousands of worshipers and tourists almost daily to their sites, and we can easily duplicate their commonality.
FOOD
July 25, 2001 | MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I was a tea drinker long before I met my Irish husband, but after I met him a morning pot of strong tea became an established ritual in our home. Darjeeling is my brew of choice, and I always make a big, full pot of it, even if we have only enough time for one cup before we're out the door. I know I'll finish it off before the day is out. This is especially true in summer, when I use what's left of my morning tea for iced tea.
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