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BUSINESS
July 21, 2012 | By David Undercoffler, Los Angeles Times auto critic
The car: 2012 Icon FJ40 The power: 420 horsepower and 458 pound-feet of torque from a custom-spec 5.7-liter V-8 engine; four-speed automatic transmission with overdrive; part-time, shift-on-the-fly, four-wheel-drive. The photos: 2012 Icon FJ40 The bragging rights: One of the most expensive ways to climb walls in a hand-crafted vehicle. The price: The FJ40 starts at around $127,000. The model we tested was closer to $148,000. The details: Icon is a shop based in Chatsworth that builds three different custom vehicles by hand, to the tune of 18 to 20 sales a year, according to owner Jonathan Ward.
ARTICLES BY DATE
IMAGE
March 24, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
Today it's rare to see a piece of celebrity-worn apparel - on screen or off - that can't be identified and even purchased with a few mouse clicks. From politician Sarah Palin's eyeglass frames (Kawasaki 704s) to film protagonist Jay Gatsby's bow tie (Brooks Bros.), the power of the Internet has made the world one great, big clickable catalog. But what if the jacket you covet was the one Amelia Earhart was wearing on her 1932 solo flight across the Atlantic? Or the dress of your dreams was last seen on Josephine Baker in a 1940 wartime photograph?
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SPORTS
December 25, 2010 | Sam Farmer
When the New York Giants play at Green Bay on Sunday, temperatures are expected to dip into the low teens. Surely, somebody will refer to the "frozen tundra" of Lambeau Field. Funny thing about that phrase, though, is that Vince Lombardi didn't like it, and didn't want it used in the Packers' highlight films. It was coined by Steve Sabol, now president of NFL Films, and he used it in his script for the "Ice Bowl," the 1967 NFL championship game between the Packers and Dallas Cowboys.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Martin Miller
If there is such a thing as a comic antihero, Elder Cunningham in the highly acclaimed and wildly irreverent "The Book of Mormon" is it. Cody Jamison Strand portrays the character who is the kind of person - very clingy, prototypically schlubby and frequently less than truthful - that would have folks of all religious denominations unified in their haste to un-friend him on Facebook. And yet, Strand's character is able to harness those repellent qualities and humorously bring together Mormon missionaries and a small village in Northern Uganda - not only in their appreciation of each other, but for the universal role that storytelling and religion play as well.  PHOTOS: Best in theater 2013 | Charles McNulty The Tony-award winning musical is now on national tour at the Pantages Theatre through May 11. Below is an edited transcript of a conversation with Strand, 24, who also performed the role on Broadway.
AUTOS
November 5, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
$250,000 buys a lot exotic curb candy. This kind of cash will net a nice Lamborghini Gallardo. Perhaps an Aston Martin DB9 Volante. A Ferrari 458 Italia is even possible. Or, $250,000 can buy a hand-built pickup truck with gobs more exclusivity than these three, and a cloak of anonymity they don't offer. Icon, the Chatsworth-based shop known for custom replica Broncos, FJ Cruisers and CJ-style Jeeps, unveiled such a truck Tuesday at the 2013 SEMA show in Las Vegas. PHOTOS: Icon's new Thriftmaster pickup Dubbed the Thriftmaster, the truck is a modern -- and powerful -- interpretation of a postwar icon.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
LAS VEGAS -- Jonathan Ward, founder of ICON autos in Chatsworth, likes to take iconic utility vehicles and give it a new spin. The Toyota Land Cruiser . The Willys CJ3B . The Ford Bronco . On the latest project, the crew at ICON took on the 1965 Dodge crew cab. ICON unveiled a special one-off Power Wagon D200 Reformer at the Optima booth at the Specialty Equipment Market Assn. trade show in Las Vegas. Photos: Highlights from the 2012 SEMA Show Painted in glossy white with black accent, the truck has a new chassis and mechanical systems taken from a modern-day Dodge Ram 3500 series pickup.
OPINION
September 1, 2013
Re "Tower foes sue city, developer," Aug. 29 Several times a week I drive through the Cahuenga Pass toward Hollywood. Twice a week I take the shuttle bus to the Hollywood Bowl, and as we approach the 101 offramp at Cahuenga, I point out the Capitol Records building to fellow riders and ask them to envision it being dwarfed by two massive buildings surrounding it. They shake their heads. For most of my life, the Capitol Records building and the Hollywood sign have been icons for this area.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Felicia Day is a sort of famous person, by which I do not mean that she is moderately famous but that her fame is of a particular type. "People are very excited about meeting me, or they're absolutely confused," Day said one recent morning over breakfast by a pool at a hotel at which she was not a guest. "It's a very specific recognition factor. I actually like that. " Among other things, Day is an actress, a writer, a nerd world pin-up and an Internet icon. (The other things include, but are not limited to: violinist, singer, dancer, math major and college valedictorian — she is something of an overachiever.)
IMAGE
February 7, 2010 | By Julie Neigher
To set eyes on a photo by Lillian Bassman is mesmerizing. The image, usually that of a striking woman, hits with the force of an epiphany. Suddenly those heroin chic ad campaigns of the '90s seem shopworn and flat. And the clunkily posed spread in this month's glossy feels oh-so-forced. In the '50s and '60s, when Bassman clicked her shutter, she created a visual time capsule. One wonders, eyeing the elegant angle of a gloved arm or the mysterious tilt of a hat, "If I stare long enough at this picture, will I hear the rustle of taffeta and tulle swaying?
OPINION
June 27, 2009
Re "King of Pop is dead at 50," June 26 For a great many years, people have been making all sorts of snide remarks and nasty jokes about Michael Jackson. But suddenly, now that he's shockingly dead, he's become a great icon -- showered with tears and flowers. The turmoil in Iran, and Farrah Fawcett too, have been quickly pushed offstage. What's going on here? What would Jackson think if he could look down on all this sentimental commotion that belies the apparent disrespect he received for so long?
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
With time running short to sign up for Obamacare, California officials have recruited labor activist Dolores Huerta to urge Latinos to get health insurance. The state's move comes amid struggles at enrolling Latinos, who represent about 60% of the state's uninsured population. Open enrollment under the Affordable Care Act ends March 31. Huerta is co-founder of the United Farm Workers union and worked for years alongside the late Cesar Chavez. She is featured in new radio and online ads for Covered California airing statewide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Emily Foxhall
The topiary dolphins at the entrance to Corona del Mar -- once shaped so precisely they appeared to be leaping out onto bustling Coast Highway -- have begun to resemble manatees. Leaf-trimming couldn't save the creatures; no specialty pruner could be found. So the city has decided to remove the iconic bushes and hire someone to grow and groom new ones. "It's very, very difficult to get them back to the original shape unless you're like an Edward Scissorhands ," said Kathy Sommer , a horticulturalist who works with the city on plant care issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
Dressed in corduroy pants, slip-on black shoes and a windbreaker, Frank Gehry strolled through a tiny universe of thread and painted metal mobiles. Light, curves and shadows; all clutter stripped away. The shapes floated in silence and the architect, who knows something of graceful sketches and clean designs, smiled, as if in the artist's vision he had found a kindred whisper. "He kind of worked intuitively," Gehry, 84, who possesses the air of a small-town hardware salesman, said of Alexander Calder.
NEWS
February 18, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
What did renowned makeup artist Kevyn Aucoin carry in his makeup kit? The answer will be revealed, along with many never-before-seen pieces from Aucoin's private and professional life, in a special “Icon Gallery” exhibition, open to beauty and fashion industry professionals as part of the Makeup Show L.A. The two-day trade show, which attracted 5,800 visitors last year, returns to Los Angeles for the sixth year on March 1 and 2, before traveling...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
A 37-year-old pacu fish and icon to tiki fans  has found a home after nearly a year of living in a closed Rosemead restaurant.  The property's current owners decided Monday they would keep Rufus and build him a new aquarium in the Chinese restaurant they plan to open. Charles Ye, a spokesman for the owners, said they decided to keep Rufus to help decorate the restaurant. They also feared moving him would be harmful to his health.  "He's 37 years old already," Ye said.
SPORTS
February 15, 2014 | By Philip Hersh
SOCHI, Russia - Shani Davis understands. He is saying hello just when he might be saying goodbye. In his fourth Olympics, Davis knows he finally has the attention of an American public that pays attention to his sport only a week or two every four years. So it pains the 31-year-old from Chicago that they are not seeing Shani Davis the champion, the skater who has won Olympic titles, world titles and a zillion World Cup races, the skater who long has been an icon in Europe, especially the Netherlands.
IMAGE
November 24, 2013 | Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Kerry Washington is everywhere. On the covers of magazines; live-tweeting her hit show, "Scandal," with her fans (who call themselves gladiators); hosting "Saturday Night Live"; and soon to be in ads for Neutrogena as the L.A.-based beauty company's new creative consultant. She's appealing all right, the enviable combination of smart and pretty with a can-do mentality to match that of her character on TV, Washington, D.C., crisis manager Olivia Pope. She's also an actress in the modern mold who knows that being a pro at the fashion game is a key to her success.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2008
Here's what readers had to say about Charlton Heston, Oscar-winning actor and unapologetic gun advocate, who died Saturday at 84: Another Hollywood great departs this world. I have always enjoyed his performances and especially his portrayal of Moses in "The Ten Commandments." God bless and comfort his family in their sorrow. -- Lee -- I did not agree with him politically, but he was a good mix of brass and class. This guy will never be replaced. Thanks for all your movies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Shirley Temple Black, who as the most popular child movie star of all time lifted a filmgoing nation's spirits during the Depression and then grew up to be a diplomat, has died. She was 85. Black died late Monday at her home in Woodside, Calif., according to publicist Cheryl J. Kagan. No cause was given. From 1935 through 1938, the curly-haired moppet billed as Shirley Temple was the top box-office draw in the nation. She saved what became 20th Century Fox studios from bankruptcy and made more than 40 movies before she turned 12. PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black Hollywood recognized the enchanting, dimpled scene-stealer's importance to the industry with a “special award” -- a miniature Oscar -- at the Academy Awards for 1934, the year she sang and danced her way into America's collective heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By August Brown
Pete Seeger's death at 94 leaves a huge hole in America's moral conscience. The folk singer was a fixture in music, politics and American life for the latter half of the 20th century, and he continued performing and speaking in public -- including at President Obama's 2009 inauguration and during the Occupy Wall Street protests -- until his death on Monday. The outpouring from fellow musicians, writers and activists was immediate. The White House released a statement describing Seeger as "America's tuning fork," and said that "[o]
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