Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIdaho Agriculture
IN THE NEWS

Idaho Agriculture

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | United Press International
Faced with a potentially disastrous nationwide boycott of Idaho potatoes, Gov. Cecil Andrus said Monday he will seek advice before deciding whether to sign a measure that would become the most restrictive state abortion law in the nation. The bill, which has been passed by both houses of the Legislature, probably will arrive on the governor's desk today. The bill would ban all abortions except in cases of severe fetal deformity, threat to the mother's health or in cases of rape or incest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | United Press International
Faced with a potentially disastrous nationwide boycott of Idaho potatoes, Gov. Cecil Andrus said Monday he will seek advice before deciding whether to sign a measure that would become the most restrictive state abortion law in the nation. The bill, which has been passed by both houses of the Legislature, probably will arrive on the governor's desk today. The bill would ban all abortions except in cases of severe fetal deformity, threat to the mother's health or in cases of rape or incest.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 26, 1988
After a hearty breakfast at a Grange hall in Moscow, Ida., 64 Iowa farmers began harvesting free hay for their hungry livestock back home. Hay mowers began cutting grass on a field about 30 miles northeast of the Idaho Panhandle town, the first of 4,500 acres of northern Idaho land set aside in a government erosion-control program. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently released the Conservation Reserve Program land, which is normally not farmed, for harvest by drought-afflicted farmers.
NEWS
August 26, 1988
After a hearty breakfast at a Grange hall in Moscow, Ida., 64 Iowa farmers began harvesting free hay for their hungry livestock back home. Hay mowers began cutting grass on a field about 30 miles northeast of the Idaho Panhandle town, the first of 4,500 acres of northern Idaho land set aside in a government erosion-control program. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently released the Conservation Reserve Program land, which is normally not farmed, for harvest by drought-afflicted farmers.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | Associated Press
Offers of food, lodging, money and equipment continued to pour in Wednesday for a group of Iowa farmers who have come to Idaho to cut free hay for their drought-starved livestock. Organizers of the hay harvest had worried there wouldn't be enough machinery to keep the Iowans busy, but offers of equipment began pouring into the Farm Bureau office here Tuesday after a Farm Bureau official appealed on television for donations.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1988 | Associated Press
A battle is boiling in eastern Idaho for the hearts and dollars of anyone who has ever seen, eaten or even heard of Idaho's famous potatoes. Three towns all want a bit of potato power to fire up local tourism, and some seem prepared to mash the opposition in their rush to open a spud center celebrating the state's most important crop.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2006 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
Hunters have fanned out across eastern Idaho in pursuit of about 100 selectively bred elk from a commercial game farm that officials fear could spread disease and introduce genetic defects among wild Rocky Mountain elk, including a prized herd in Yellowstone National Park, just eight miles away. Idaho's governor recently authorized a "depredation hunt" of the escaped elk, the first time such a hunt has been ordered, according to state wildlife officials.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2004 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration proposed new forest rules Monday that could lead to logging, mining and oil and gas development in remote country that had been protected under a policy issued in the waning days of the Clinton presidency. The regulations would replace a January 2001 rule that banned road building and timber cutting on 58.5 million acres of roadless terrain in national forests with a policy giving state governors a say in the backcountry's management.
NEWS
June 7, 1987 | LISA LEVITT RYCKMAN, Associated Press
Cattleman Bob Jahn has survived a time when many ranchers decided that a home on the range wasn't worth singing about, when discouraging words were heard all too often and the financial skies were downright stormy all day. "Right around here, we're about the only ones left in the cattle business," said Jahn, who will be 70 this summer. "Oh, there's a few, but quite a few have given up." His son, Brad Jahn, is among the latter.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | Associated Press
Offers of food, lodging, money and equipment continued to pour in Wednesday for a group of Iowa farmers who have come to Idaho to cut free hay for their drought-starved livestock. Organizers of the hay harvest had worried there wouldn't be enough machinery to keep the Iowans busy, but offers of equipment began pouring into the Farm Bureau office here Tuesday after a Farm Bureau official appealed on television for donations.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1988 | Associated Press
A battle is boiling in eastern Idaho for the hearts and dollars of anyone who has ever seen, eaten or even heard of Idaho's famous potatoes. Three towns all want a bit of potato power to fire up local tourism, and some seem prepared to mash the opposition in their rush to open a spud center celebrating the state's most important crop.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|