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Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

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NEWS
December 16, 1986 | Associated Press
A third shipment of radioactive debris from the damaged Three Mile Island nuclear reactor has left the power plant for a laboratory in Idaho, a project spokesman said Monday. The two containers of rubble, weighing about 19,500 pounds, are being shipped by rail to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where Department of Energy officials will study the debris, Terry Smith of the Three Mile Island fuel shipping program said.
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BUSINESS
August 4, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A team led by Lockheed Corp. won a $5-billion contract from the Department of Energy on Wednesday to take over management of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, a nuclear research center outside Idaho Falls. Lockheed hailed the five-year award as a major step in the Calabasas-based aerospace giant's effort to pare its reliance on defense spending. The contract is also a victory for Parsons Corp., a Pasadena-based engineering firm on the Lockheed team.
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NEWS
February 2, 1989
The Energy Department has agreed to spend $456 million in the next five years to clean up hundreds of thousands of barrels of buried nuclear waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Gov. Cecil D. Andrus said. The federal agency more than tripled its budget request for clean-up money at the laboratory for fiscal year 1989 since Andrus imposed a ban in October on the further shipment of nuclear waste to the site near Idaho Falls.
NEWS
September 1, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the potato fields trail off and give way to the Arco Desert, the first of the buildings appear as white flecks in the distance, with hazy mountains as the backdrop. For more than 40 years, this 500,000-acre government reservation was a testing ground of the nuclear age. Here at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory they developed 52 different types of nuclear reactors--more than any place in the world--including the first reactor for a submarine.
NEWS
June 21, 1989
The Energy Department has decided to make a closer study of environmental risks posed by a plutonium refinery being built at the department's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory near San Francisco, a House panel chairman said. The project is a prototype for a permanent refinery, called the Special Isotope Separation plant, that the department wants to build at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, near Idaho Falls. The Livermore study is expected to delay the start of construction in Idaho for at least two years.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A team led by Lockheed Corp. won a $5-billion contract from the Department of Energy on Wednesday to take over management of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, a nuclear research center outside Idaho Falls. Lockheed hailed the five-year award as a major step in the Calabasas-based aerospace giant's effort to pare its reliance on defense spending. The contract is also a victory for Parsons Corp., a Pasadena-based engineering firm on the Lockheed team.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Energy Department gave Congress "improper and unrealistic" estimates of the cost of building new military reactors in South Carolina and Idaho, federal auditors told House panel members Wednesday. Officials of the General Accounting Office also said the department had understated the time it would take to complete the reactors, which the Bush Administration says can be in operation within 10 years for $6.8 billion. In testimony before a special panel of the House Armed Services Committee, J. Dexter Peach, the GAO's assistant comptroller general, raised doubts about other key aspects of the Administration's plan, which was announced last August.
NEWS
September 1, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the potato fields trail off and give way to the Arco Desert, the first of the buildings appear as white flecks in the distance, with hazy mountains as the backdrop. For more than 40 years, this 500,000-acre government reservation was a testing ground of the nuclear age. Here at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory they developed 52 different types of nuclear reactors--more than any place in the world--including the first reactor for a submarine.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | Associated Press
Nineteen of 25 workers tested were found to be slightly contaminated after an accidental release of radiation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.
NEWS
October 15, 1986 | United Press International
Sixteen tons of low-level radioactive uranium recovered from the Snake River, where it was dumped in a tractor-trailer accident, will be stored in Idaho until it can be shipped to a facility in Washington, officials said Tuesday. Crates containing the uranium were taken to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls.
NEWS
June 21, 1989
The Energy Department has decided to make a closer study of environmental risks posed by a plutonium refinery being built at the department's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory near San Francisco, a House panel chairman said. The project is a prototype for a permanent refinery, called the Special Isotope Separation plant, that the department wants to build at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, near Idaho Falls. The Livermore study is expected to delay the start of construction in Idaho for at least two years.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Energy Department gave Congress "improper and unrealistic" estimates of the cost of building new military reactors in South Carolina and Idaho, federal auditors told House panel members Wednesday. Officials of the General Accounting Office also said the department had understated the time it would take to complete the reactors, which the Bush Administration says can be in operation within 10 years for $6.8 billion. In testimony before a special panel of the House Armed Services Committee, J. Dexter Peach, the GAO's assistant comptroller general, raised doubts about other key aspects of the Administration's plan, which was announced last August.
NEWS
February 2, 1989
The Energy Department has agreed to spend $456 million in the next five years to clean up hundreds of thousands of barrels of buried nuclear waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Gov. Cecil D. Andrus said. The federal agency more than tripled its budget request for clean-up money at the laboratory for fiscal year 1989 since Andrus imposed a ban in October on the further shipment of nuclear waste to the site near Idaho Falls.
NEWS
December 16, 1986 | Associated Press
A third shipment of radioactive debris from the damaged Three Mile Island nuclear reactor has left the power plant for a laboratory in Idaho, a project spokesman said Monday. The two containers of rubble, weighing about 19,500 pounds, are being shipped by rail to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where Department of Energy officials will study the debris, Terry Smith of the Three Mile Island fuel shipping program said.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | From Times wire services
The U.S. Department of Energy today agreed to pay for an accelerated, $456-million cleanup of buried nuclear waste at its Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Gov. Cecil D. Andrus announced today. The agreement came more than three months after the governor closed Idaho's borders to temporary storage of nuclear waste.
NEWS
December 12, 1986 | United Press International
Two quality control inspectors at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory were exposed to maximum allowed doses of radiation in an accident, Energy Department officials said Thursday. Two employees of Northwest X-Ray Inc. suffered the exposure while performing weld inspections this week at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant on the federal nuclear reservation. The two were taken to medical examination facilities and later released.
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