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April 10, 1998 | Associated Press
A 14-year-old boy briefly held some of his classmates hostage at a school for troubled youngsters Thursday, police said, then surrendered after trading his guns for snacks and cigarettes. After initially holding about a dozen students inside the Alternate School, the boy permitted them to leave, police said, addings that four students remained with him voluntarily until he gave up nearly five hours later. "The release of hostages was never an issue of the negotiations.
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NEWS
July 6, 2008 | Jessie L. Bonner, Associated Press
The farmland faces a skinny stretch of Hunt Road, fields that barely resemble the sagebrush-ridden piece of desert where Charles Coiner learned to drive as a teenager in southern Idaho. Coiner grew up about 15 miles from the site where Japanese Americans were detained behind five miles of barbed wire during World War II. They lived in tar paper-covered barracks at the Minidoka Relocation Center compound. "Even driving by here as a kid, nobody talked about it," he said. Coiner revisited the site in May with a group of Centennial High School students on a field trip, the culmination of several weeks the students spent studying World War II internment camps such as Minidoka.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1997 | From Associated Press
An Idaho school district violated the religious freedom of a school principal by demoting him for planning to remove his children from the district and teach them at home, a federal appeals court ruled this week. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a jury's $300,000 damage award to former elementary school Principal Frank Peterson and awarded him attorney fees from the district.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | Associated Press
A 14-year-old boy briefly held some of his classmates hostage at a school for troubled youngsters Thursday, police said, then surrendered after trading his guns for snacks and cigarettes. After initially holding about a dozen students inside the Alternate School, the boy permitted them to leave, police said, addings that four students remained with him voluntarily until he gave up nearly five hours later. "The release of hostages was never an issue of the negotiations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1986 | Associated Press
Giving Bibles to a public school class violated the constitutional separation of church and state, the American Civil Liberties Union alleges in a lawsuit against a school system. Carolyn Hill, a parent named in the suit, contends that Alan Joshua's constitutional rights were violated March 4 when he and 34 fifth-grade classmates were given Bibles at Paris Elementary School in the southeastern Idaho town of Paris.
NEWS
July 6, 2008 | Jessie L. Bonner, Associated Press
The farmland faces a skinny stretch of Hunt Road, fields that barely resemble the sagebrush-ridden piece of desert where Charles Coiner learned to drive as a teenager in southern Idaho. Coiner grew up about 15 miles from the site where Japanese Americans were detained behind five miles of barbed wire during World War II. They lived in tar paper-covered barracks at the Minidoka Relocation Center compound. "Even driving by here as a kid, nobody talked about it," he said. Coiner revisited the site in May with a group of Centennial High School students on a field trip, the culmination of several weeks the students spent studying World War II internment camps such as Minidoka.
NEWS
September 21, 2008 | Jessie L. Bonner, Associated Press
The elementary school at the edge of this rural town has a playground that boasts little more than a swing set. That's no problem -- the hot new game is inside. Chess, once used as a way to teach war strategy, is now being taught to second- and third-graders across Idaho once a week as part of a plan to make students better at subjects like math and reading. "At first I thought, 'You've got to be kidding,' " said Penny Lattimer, a Council Elementary School teacher. "We already have so much stuff to teach."
NEWS
February 8, 1985 | From United Press International
A ferocious blizzard tore through Idaho and Utah today, and snowmobiles were dispatched to rescue bus travelers stranded in four-foot snowdrifts. Winds up to 60 m.p.h. whipped snow into blinding curtains that cut visibility to zero. "We've had motorists stranded and multiple-vehicle accidents. It's zero visibility," Idaho State Police dispatcher Eric Anderson said in Pocatello. "It's a nightmare down here."
BUSINESS
April 26, 1999 | KRISTEN MOULTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jack Simplot is an old man and feels it. The potato farmer who built an agricultural colossus in one generation and bankrolled Micron Technology in the next turned 90 on Jan. 4. He has hung up his skis, talks of moving out of the corner office at J.R. Simplot Co. headquarters to make room for the president, and has told Micron he will soon retire from the board.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, the state safety inspector declared this town's 86-year-old high school, a crumbling brick structure squatting on a hill over downtown, "no longer safe to occupy." Fix it fast or abandon it, the inspector said. School officials knew its shortcomings only too well. The fire escape clings to the wall by a couple of loose bolts. Exposed pipes run along the ceiling. The girls locker room sits in a narrow basement space next to the old furnace, and if it ever blows, there's no escape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1997 | From Associated Press
An Idaho school district violated the religious freedom of a school principal by demoting him for planning to remove his children from the district and teach them at home, a federal appeals court ruled this week. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a jury's $300,000 damage award to former elementary school Principal Frank Peterson and awarded him attorney fees from the district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1986 | Associated Press
Giving Bibles to a public school class violated the constitutional separation of church and state, the American Civil Liberties Union alleges in a lawsuit against a school system. Carolyn Hill, a parent named in the suit, contends that Alan Joshua's constitutional rights were violated March 4 when he and 34 fifth-grade classmates were given Bibles at Paris Elementary School in the southeastern Idaho town of Paris.
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