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Idealab Company

BUSINESS
May 14, 1999 | Karen Kaplan
An Idealab e-commerce start-up is taking the unusual step of partnering with a bricks-and-mortar business to sell merchandise on the Web. Pasadena-based PetJungle.com announced a strategic alliance with the Phoenix-based pet supply powerhouse Petsmart to create Petsmart.com. The e-commerce venture will use Petsmart's existing catalog fulfillment operation to supply and ship goods that are ordered on the new Web site, said Phil Francis, Petsmart's president and chief executive.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 1999 | Jonathan Gaw
Idealab's Pet Project: Idealab, the Pasadena-based technology incubator, has appointed Tom McGovern chief executive and co-president of an Internet site that markets pet supplies, the company will announce today. The site, which has yet to be named, will launch in the next 45 days, joining other Idealab ventures such as EToys, Cooking.com and the WeddingChannel. The new venture, however, will face heavy competition, given Amazon.com's announcement that it had bought half of Pets.com.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1997 | MICHELLE V. RAFTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Freelance writer Michelle Rafter (mvrafter@deltanet.com) is a regular contributor to The Cutting Edge
It's easy to see what excites people about Idealab, Bill Gross' Internet start-up factory. Known and respected as an idea machine, crackerjack technologist and marketing marvel, Gross is the quintessential computer industry entrepreneur. The Caltech grad and Pasadena resident sold his first software company to Lotus and went on to found Knowledge Adventure, the children's software publisher that CUC International snapped up in March for $100 million.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1996 | JONATHAN WEBER, Jonathan Weber, editor of The Cutting Edge, can be reached at jonathan.weber@latimes.com
Bill Gross had a problem. It was the kind of problem most entrepreneurs would welcome, and Gross wasn't missing any meals as a result, but it was a problem nonetheless: too many ideas. They poured forth constantly from the Caltech graduate's peripatetic mind, ideas for new high-tech companies, for the products and services they might sell and for the business strategies they should employ.
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