Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIdeas
IN THE NEWS

Ideas

NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - As international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions stall, schemes to slow global warming using fantastical technologies once dismissed as a sideshow are getting serious consideration in Washington. Ships that spew salt into the air to block sunlight. Mirrored satellites designed to bounce solar rays back into space. Massive "reverse" power plants that would suck carbon from the atmosphere. These are among the ideas the National Academy of Sciences has charged a panel of some of the nation's top climate thinkers to investigate.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Gov. Jerry Brown enjoys a unique position that no California governor has been in for 68 years. He is a virtual shoo-in for reelection. That gives him an extremely rare opportunity to rise above conventional political rhetoric and open a substantive dialogue with voters about the state's future direction. In a cakewalk, there's little risk of tripping. A California governor hasn't had such an opening since immediately after World War II. In 1946, Republican Earl Warren won both major parties' nominations and was reelected in November with nearly 92% of the vote.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
There are two broad categories of government reformer. One is the type who tries addressing government inequities where and as they occur - a housing crisis here, a water crisis there, racial discrimination here, there and everywhere. Then there's the type who advocates throwing out the old system wholesale and starting from scratch. Timothy C. Draper, 55, a successful venture capital investor with a lengthy record of public involvement to his name, plainly has thrown in his lot with the latter group.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Stacey D'Erasmo
The risks that Helen Oyeyemi takes in her fifth novel, "Boy, Snow, Bird," are astonishing in their boldness. "Nobody ever warned me about mirrors," begins the narrator, Boy, a pale white girl in Manhattan's East Village whose rat-catcher father beats her until she runs away to a small town in Massachusetts and marries a man she doesn't love. It is 1953. The man she doesn't love, a widower, has a small child, also very pale and very beautiful, and very beloved by all, named Snow. In time, Boy and her husband have their own child, Bird, who is black; this is how Boy discovers that her husband and much of his family have been passing for white.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Noelle Carter
It's Gluten-Free Wednesday. If you're like so many who crave pasta but need to stay away from wheat, fret no more. Check out these ideas: Rice noodle bowl with stir-fried beef: You can't go wrong here when you're craving a great noodle bowl. A fresh, crunchy salad is topped with a mound of noodles and richly flavored stir-fried beef. Garnish with fried shallots and peanuts and serve alongside a dipping sauce for a simple one-dish meal that comes together in about an hour.  Cashew cream fettuccine Alfredo: With its rich flavor, you might not guess this dish is both gluten-free and vegan!
BUSINESS
February 20, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
HENDERSON, Nev. - Sometimes it's not what's on the walls but what's in them that makes a home stand out. That was the case this month at the unveiling of the 2014 New American Home outside Las Vegas, an annual demonstration of the latest in residential design and construction. The showcase house is somewhat subdued-looking outside with a color scheme drawing from the desert landscape. But the residence shines in ways that aren't visible, such as the spray-foam insulation hidden in the walls that helps make it the most energy-efficient demonstration home constructed in the 31 years the National Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
You're invited to a party. It's going to be fun, because it's being thrown by writer Chad Harbach, an editor of the literary magazine n+1, where he has been lightheartedly provocative. You're excited, because "MFA vs. NYC: The Two Cultures of American Fiction" - in the form of 18 essays divided into five sections - is debating one of the more contentious issues in literary America: whether getting an a master of fine arts degree in creative writing is a good idea, for the individual writer and book culture at large.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
You'd think someone whose very life and livelihood are all about history would be a little more mindful of it - even the bad bits. Of all people, Prince William, the heir presumptive to the British throne, should know something about the dangers of forgetting history, accidentally or deliberately. And yet, in his passion for the deeply, harrowingly important cause of ending the killing of animals for the ivory trade, he wants to get rid of the evidence of the crimes he wishes to expose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014 | By Marisa Gerber
In one of his earliest boyhood memories, Dion Neutra walked out the front door of his family's Silver Lake home and down to the water's edge. It was the early 1930s, and the wall around Silver Lake Reservoir was so low that he could fling a fishing line above it and into the water. But over the next eight decades, the architect - who trained under his father, Richard Neutra, a master of Modernism who lived and worked out of Silver Lake - watched as the water he loved began to change.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Noelle Carter
Looking for last-minute ideas for Valentine's Day? Let's start with dessert. Each of these treats comes together using only a handful of ingredients and no special equipment. I will warn you, two of them take a little time to set up: the lemon posset -- a pudding-like dessert -- needs chilling time, and the other, a frozen chocolate zabaglione, freezes like a creamy gelato.  Hazelnut zabaglione: Try a sherry-based zabaglione, whisking in a moderately sweet oloroso with just a touch of hazelnut liqueur.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|