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Identification

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
Whale researchers, countering a tide of skepticism, have found ways to use photographs to identify and track the world's most mysterious mammals individually and over decades. Placed in burgeoning whale "photo albums," the pictures are providing answers to questions about whale biology that in many cases could never be answered before. Births, deaths, social groupings and migration patterns are showing up in the thousands of photos that telephoto lenses snap every year.
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NEWS
June 29, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine placing your hand on a scanner or speaking into a computer to speed your way across the border. Beam me across, Scotty. Immigration officials are experimenting with biometrics and other identification systems--the stuff you read about in sci-fi books--to cut traffic delays and free up inspectors to focus on illegal immigrants and smugglers.
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | JANICE HUGHES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Four-year-old Andrew Hitchings says he wants to be a crocodile. And eat tuna fish in the bathtub. "He's into reptiles," says his mother, Mary Hitchings. Linda Ford, a herpetologist--that's someone who studies amphibians and reptiles--nods and opens the white croc jawbone one more time for Andrew. She sits behind a table resplendent with a coiled boa skeleton, snakeskins and salamanders. Nearby, what seems to be the largest, hairiest spider in the world is taken out of a cage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1998 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Secretary of State Bill Jones is asking voters statewide to send him their driver's license numbers as part of a program to attach a number to each registered voter. The request is being made in voter guides mailed this week to the state's 14.5 million voters. The program is designed to eliminate duplicate registrations that occur mainly when people relocate and reregister, said spokesman Alfie Charles.
NEWS
May 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore said Friday he wants to make it a federal crime to sell Social Security numbers. "I strongly believe that we have way too casual use of Social Security numbers," Gore said. "We need to protect them." Gore disclosed his intentions while hosting an open meeting with parents, teachers and students at Cordova School outside of Memphis, Tenn.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1992 | From American Banker
Concerned about increases in fraud, the major bank card associations are considering the mandatory use of personal identification numbers for credit card purchases. The idea, long considered impractical with credit cards, was broached in a speech last week by Alex Hart, president of Mastercard International Inc. "I think we are at great risk every passing month that we don't move forward to implement PINs," Hart told members of the International Assn. of Credit Card Investigators.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1994 | JEFFREY BAIR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Clinton holds all the cards in the Administration's campaign to give each American a uniform health insurance identifier. His health reform agenda, which is bound to spawn a medical bureaucracy lasting into the next century, includes an obscure but important detail: the need for factories that can churn out plastic "health security" cards guaranteeing access to care.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | ITABARI NJERI, Times Staff Writer
"Nobody Knows My Name," James Baldwin wrote. At the deepest level of the collective African-American psyche, the title was a metaphor for the blighting of black history and culture before the nadir of slavery and since. Now, at the end of the 20th Century, which historian W. E. B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1998 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veteran archeologist Frank McDowell arrived at Arco's Carson refinery in mid-September, ready to begin a routine excavation of a recently discovered Indian burial site. Instead, he found a mystery. In one of Southern California's most unusual--and possibly most significant--archeological finds is evidence of a human cataclysm that wiped out at least 50 Gabrielinos, including two unborn children, probably about 200 years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Los Angeles police officer was sentenced Friday to more than six years in prison for bribery, robbery, gun possession and manufacturing fake LAPD identification cards. Earlier this week, a jury convicted Michael Edelstein, who authorities say is also charged with extortion in an unrelated case in New York, of the bribery and card charges. He then pleaded guilty to the remaining charges in a deal with prosecutors.
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