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Identity Thefts

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2008 | Joanna Lin, Times Staff Writer
Police have arrested a Texas man suspected in identity thefts involving more than 160 UC Irvine graduate and medical students, authorities said. Michael Tyrone Thomas, 27, of Fort Worth, was an employee in the Student Resources Department of United Healthcare in Dallas, authorities said. The company manages the university's graduate student health insurance program. The 163 identity theft reports involved students in the 2006-07 school year, said UCI Police Chief Paul Henisey.
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BUSINESS
March 24, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu and E. Scott Reckard
Increasing activity by data hackers has produced millions of victims and one clear winner: the credit monitoring business. Services with names such as BillGuard and Identity Guard report a surge in sign-ups from people anxious to be protected. Nervous consumers worry that the parade of data breaches involving credit card, debit card and other personal information could leave them vulnerable to fraud and identity theft. The latest incident was revealed Saturday when the California Department of Motor Vehicles said it was "alerted by law enforcement authorities to a potential security issue within its credit card processing services.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2002 | Carol Chambers, Times Staff Writer
Six Antelope Valley residents have been arrested in a rash of identity and mail thefts totaling tens of thousands of dollars, authorities said Wednesday. The names of the five men and one woman arrested Tuesday and Wednesday were not released because investigations into the thefts are ongoing, said Lt. Ed Dvorak of the Los Angeles County sheriff's Palmdale station. There were more than a dozen victims, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Two men were arrested in connection with the identity theft of U.S. Army Reserve officers who were on active duty in Afghanistan, authorities said. Mauro Cortez, 25, and Rigoberto Cortez, 29, were arrested Wednesday after the Los Angeles County Identity Theft Task Force served a search warrant at a home in Pomona, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. The men were allegedly provided the identity information of more than five U.S. Army Reserve officers who were serving overseas in Afghanistan and then used it to establish lines of credit and buy cars. Deputies found evidence at the home allegedly linking the Cortez men to the identity theft.  The loss is estimated to be more than $100,000.
NATIONAL
June 1, 2007 | From the Washington Post
From his 17th-floor Seattle apartment overlooking Puget Sound, Robert Alan Soloway allegedly ran an illicit network of computers around the world, secretly commandeering the machines of thousands of unsuspecting bystanders. Prosecutors say Internet users who clicked on infected e-mails and websites inadvertently took part in his criminal endeavor: spam.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2007 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
Scott Giordano didn't know his identity had been stolen until he decided in 2005 to move to take a new job. He'd put a down payment on a house and quit his job as a San Bernardino firefighter before hearing that he'd failed a background check conducted by the employer that wanted to hire him. The reason: There were nine people, in different parts of the country, employed under his Social Security number.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Two people from Carson have been charged with stealing the identities of retired state Sen. Charles Calderon and his wife, Lisa, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said Friday. Kellien Coralle Zink, 22, and Ryan Dacanay, 23, are accused of using information found in material taken from the Calderon mailbox in Los Angeles to make credit purchases, add a cell phone account and open several credit accounts on the Internet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2002 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While crime declined in most local cities last year, reported offenses rose in Camarillo for the second straight year as that upscale community continued a tradition of steep swings in some criminal offenses. Camarillo's serious crime increased only 5.5% overall, but a sharp hike in violent incidents showed how easily statistics can shift up or down in a city where the number of offenses is relatively small. "There weren't any significant changes that I'm concerned about," said Sheriff's Cmdr.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
The number of identity thefts reported by banks and other financial institutions more than doubled in 2000 from the previous year, the government said Monday. There were 617 instances of identity theft from January through November last year, compared with 267 cases for all of 1999, according to information compiled by the Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, dubbed FinCen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2000 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the police finally tracked down Jessica Smith's stolen car in North Hollywood, with her handbag still inside, she breathed a sigh of relief. The thief seemed to have taken only replaceable items: cash, her driver's license and her Social Security card. But credit card companies mysteriously began rejecting Smith, she couldn't get phone service or rent an apartment, and she almost got fired when an employer's criminal background check turned up arrest warrants on prostitution charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
Prosecutors announced Thursday that two San Bernardino city councilmen have been charged in separate criminal cases, with one of them admitting his guilt, resigning his post and ending his bid for mayor weeks before election day. Chas Kelley pleaded guilty to a perjury charge for lying on campaign finance documents, forcing him to resign the seat he had held since 2003. Robert Jenkins faces 18 felony and 12 misdemeanor counts related to identity theft and stalking. Prosecutors allege that he targeted a former partner.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2013 | David Lazarus
Here's a hard-and-fast rule: Don't give your Social Security number to anyone unless it's absolutely necessary. More than 12 million Americans fell victim to identity theft last year, according to Javelin Strategy & Research. Losses topped $21 billion, with the costliest data breaches involving fraudsters gaining access to people's Social Security numbers. With all that in mind, it's hard to imagine that any business nowadays would ask consumers to part with their Social Security number except for the most important of reasons.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber
As the capital murder trial of the Ohio man accused of murdering three men after luring them in Craigslist ads with the promise of work in 2011 entered its second day Tuesday, the jury had already heard two stark descriptions of the defendant. Prosecutors painted 53-year-old Richard Beasley, dubbed the “Craigslist Killer,” as a manipulative murderer who preyed on down-on-their-luck job seekers. The defense, however, told the Summit County jury that although Beasley wasn't perfect, they planned to prove that the physically ailing man wasn't a murderer.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2012 | By Scott J. Wilson, Los Angeles Times
An identity thief who gains access to your credit card or bank account could harm you financially, but one who steals your medical information could also endanger your health. Here are key things to know about medical identity theft: • When an impostor uses your identity to get hospital care, order prescription drugs or submit fraudulent insurance claims, false information may end up in your medical record. This could be "a different blood type, an inaccurate history of drug or alcohol abuse, test results that aren't yours, or a diagnosis of an illness, allergy or condition you don't have," the Federal Trade Commission warned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2012 | Richard Winton and Jason Song
The arrests seem to be piling up at an unusual pace. Two weeks ago, a six-year employee of the Los Angeles County Probation Department was charged with persistently filing false workers' compensation claims. Earlier this month, police arrested a probation officer for allegedly shooting a man in a Covina bar. Those cases came on top of the dozens of drunk driving, drug possession and theft arrests that seemed scattered throughout the 6,500-employee agency. On Monday, FBI agents arrested the highest-ranking member of the department yet -- Carl Edward Washington, a division chief of intergovernmental relations and former state legislator.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Advertisers, bullies and sexual predators aren't the only ones trying to get their hands on your kid's information online. Don't forget about identity thieves. Although many adults regularly check their own credit reports to keep tabs on activity, most parents don't expect their children to have a credit file to have to check. And they wouldn't, unless someone has snagged the necessary details and commandeered your kids' persona.  When a child's identity is stolen, it can be years before it's discovered, according to the Federal Trade Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2000 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the police finally tracked down Jessica Smith's stolen car in North Hollywood, with her handbag still inside, she breathed a sigh of relief. The thief seemed to have taken only replaceable items: cash, her driver's license and Social Security card. But credit card companies mysteriously began rejecting Smith. She couldn't get phone service or rent an apartment, and almost got fired when an employer's criminal background check turned up arrest warrants on prostitution charges.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Thinking of selling your smartphone or laptop computer? If you have a BlackBerry or an iPhone, go right ahead. If you were planning to sell an Android phone or a computer running Windows XP, however, you may want to think again,  McAfee identify theft expert Robert Siciliano says. Siciliano recently purchased 30 electronic devices from Craigslist - mostly smartphones and laptops - to see how effective normal people are at removing personal information from their gadgets before selling them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Match.com, eHarmony and Spark Networks agreed Tuesday to screen their prospective online dating clients for histories of sexual assault, violence and identify theft, California Atty. Gen.Kamala D. Harris announced. The agreement stemmed from a lawsuit brought last year by a Match.com client who was raped on a date with a repeat sex offender to whom she had been matched by the dating service. The companies also promised to improve safe-dating advice offered online and to educate clients about the risks of being targeted in financial scams.
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