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Identity Thieves

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
Hoping to avert future cases of identity theft, authorities have issued a warning to Thousand Oaks residents to stop placing outgoing mail in their curbside mailboxes. Last week, authorities handled six cases of theft from mailboxes on and around Gainsborough Road, said Ventura County Sheriff's Senior Deputy Larry Logan. Authorities believe the thief or thieves are stealing the mail to obtain personal information, such as credit card account numbers and Social Security numbers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 5, 2012 | By Scott J. Wilson, Los Angeles Times
When on vacation or any extended trip, you could be vulnerable to scams, both at your home and your destination. Here are tips from AARP on protecting your identity and money: • Stop mail delivery. This can be arranged online via holdmail.usps.com/holdmail or at your local post office. Not only does an overstuffed mailbox suggest you're not home, but identity thieves also could snatch your bank and credit card statements. You can pause newspaper deliveries by contacting the paper.
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OPINION
July 12, 2003
Perhaps the only thing worse than learning that thieves have hijacked your Social Security and credit card numbers is to discover that you might have been able to stop them before they bought big screen TVs, leather jackets and a taste of the high life in Las Vegas. The number of people who steal Social Security numbers to open credit card accounts, write bad checks and buy cars has surged in recent years.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Advertisers, bullies and sexual predators aren't the only ones trying to get their hands on your kid's information online. Don't forget about identity thieves. Although many adults regularly check their own credit reports to keep tabs on activity, most parents don't expect their children to have a credit file to have to check. And they wouldn't, unless someone has snagged the necessary details and commandeered your kids' persona.  When a child's identity is stolen, it can be years before it's discovered, according to the Federal Trade Commission.
NEWS
November 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A preliminary inspection of computer disks seized in an identity theft investigation in Portland, Ore., indicates that more than two-thirds of the state's residents could have been targeted, authorities said. Some of the 85 disks recovered from the home of Jody Gene Oates include the names, home addresses, dates of birth and Oregon driver's license numbers for 269,889 people whose last names begin with B, said Det. Roger Bush, whose name was among them.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2011 | By Scott J. Wilson, Los Angeles Times
As many as 9 million Americans have their identities stolen each year, according to the Federal Trade Commission. Identity thieves may use your personal information to access your financial accounts, open credit cards, even rent an apartment in your name. Here are tips from the FTC, National Consumers League and Gibson Research on avoiding identity theft: Never click on links sent in unsolicited emails. They could lead to legitimate-looking websites aimed at tricking you into entering your Social Security number, user name or account passwords.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2010 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
With identity fraud on the increase, the federal government is stepping up efforts to make sure businesses are on the alert — especially financial institutions and other companies that issue credit cards. The government says that businesses have the responsibility of making sure thieves don't use stolen information to buy goods or open phony accounts. And to that end, the Federal Trade Commission wants businesses that might be targets of identity thieves to develop written plans to spot "red flags" that fraud could be involved and prevent it. Starting June 1, all businesses that extend credit to customers will have to develop plans to try to prevent identity theft.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2012 | By Scott J. Wilson, Los Angeles Times
When on vacation or any extended trip, you could be vulnerable to scams, both at your home and your destination. Here are tips from AARP on protecting your identity and money: • Stop mail delivery. This can be arranged online via holdmail.usps.com/holdmail or at your local post office. Not only does an overstuffed mailbox suggest you're not home, but identity thieves also could snatch your bank and credit card statements. You can pause newspaper deliveries by contacting the paper.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2005 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
Identity thieves have struck again, using stolen passwords to tap personal data on more than 30,000 Americans kept by information broker LexisNexis, the company said Wednesday. The disclosure came at a bad time for an industry suddenly in the glare of unfavorable publicity. Although apparently unrelated to a larger security breach at ChoicePoint Inc.
OPINION
September 28, 2002
In his Sept. 23 commentary, "Treat Driver's Licenses as What They Are: Domestic Passports," Amitai Etzioni freely admits that in his ideal world our driver's licenses would serve as a national identification card. His candor is admirable. His logic is not. Etzioni passes over the obvious: Do Americans really trust their departments of motor vehicles to run a complex national ID program--keeping our most sensitive information secure from information pirates and free from bureaucratic error?
BUSINESS
January 7, 2012 | By Jay Weaver
Without a hitch, Ed and Kelley Brill had filed their joint income-tax returns from the same home address for 14 years. But last year, after obtaining an extension, the Miami Shores, Fla., couple were shocked to learn that the Internal Revenue Service had rejected their electronically filed return. It turned out that a thief had stolen Kelley Brill's identity, Social Security number and employer's name, then filed a falsified refund claim — beating the Brills to the punch. Now the parents of three school-age children — who still have no idea how they were victimized — must wait six to 12 months to get their $7,918 refund.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2011 | David Lazarus
You can't know how big a hassle it is to have your identity stolen until some scammer enters your life and starts taking over. Michael Kalbs and his wife, Judy Rosen, learned this the hard way recently when they discovered that someone was applying for -- and receiving -- credit cards in Rosen's name and running up thousands of dollars in bills for gas and other everyday purchases. Then they had to spend weeks untangling the mess with various banks, businesses and credit reporting companies.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2011 | By Scott J. Wilson, Los Angeles Times
As many as 9 million Americans have their identities stolen each year, according to the Federal Trade Commission. Identity thieves may use your personal information to access your financial accounts, open credit cards, even rent an apartment in your name. Here are tips from the FTC, National Consumers League and Gibson Research on avoiding identity theft: Never click on links sent in unsolicited emails. They could lead to legitimate-looking websites aimed at tricking you into entering your Social Security number, user name or account passwords.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2010 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
With identity fraud on the increase, the federal government is stepping up efforts to make sure businesses are on the alert — especially financial institutions and other companies that issue credit cards. The government says that businesses have the responsibility of making sure thieves don't use stolen information to buy goods or open phony accounts. And to that end, the Federal Trade Commission wants businesses that might be targets of identity thieves to develop written plans to spot "red flags" that fraud could be involved and prevent it. Starting June 1, all businesses that extend credit to customers will have to develop plans to try to prevent identity theft.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2009
Fiction weeks on list 1. U Is for Undertow by Sue Grafton (Putnam: $27.95) PI Kinsey Millhone investigates the 20-year-old case of the mysterious disappearance of a 4-year-old girl. 1 2. Too Much Happiness by Alice Munro (Knopf : $25.95) The short-story master explores women and their relationships in 10 new stories. 3 3. The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam: $24.95) The lives of a maid, a cook and a college graduate become intertwined as they change a Mississippi town.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2009
Fiction Weeks on list 1. U is for Undertow by Sue Grafton (Putnam: $27.95) PI Kinsey Millhone investigates the 20-year-old case of the mysterious disappearance of a 4-year-old girl. 1 2. Too Much Happiness by Alice Munro (Knopf : $25.95) The short story master explores women and their relationships in 10 new stories. 3 3. The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam: $24.95) The lives of a maid, a cook and a college graduate become intertwined as they change a Mississippi town.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2009
Fiction weeks on list 1. U Is for Undertow by Sue Grafton (Putnam: $27.95) PI Kinsey Millhone investigates the 20-year-old case of the mysterious disappearance of a 4-year-old girl. 1 2. Too Much Happiness by Alice Munro (Knopf : $25.95) The short-story master explores women and their relationships in 10 new stories. 3 3. The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam: $24.95) The lives of a maid, a cook and a college graduate become intertwined as they change a Mississippi town.
NEWS
September 24, 2006 | Becky Yerak, Chicago Tribune
Caller ID isn't the crystal ball that it used to be. Revered for years by persnickety consumers who like to screen their telephone calls, the premium service is being appropriated by identity thieves. Such scams are made possible by technology that enables con artists to manipulate the phone number and even the name that shows up on the unsuspecting recipient's caller ID, allowing scammers to masquerade as officials of churches, banks and courthouses.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2005 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
To guard against identity theft, John and Mary Benbow of La Jolla took their first names off their personal checks, using their initials instead. They shred documents that show any of their identification numbers and carry credit cards only when they plan to use them. Whenever they see a doctor or go to the pharmacy, however, they must present Medicare cards inscribed with their Social Security numbers -- numbers widely viewed as the keys to identify theft.
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