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Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race

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SPORTS
March 16, 1993
Jeff King left Koyuk, Alaska, two minutes ahead of DeeDee Jonnrowe and Rick Mackey to lead the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.
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SPORTS
March 6, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
In a surprise to no one, Lance Mackey, who has won the race four times (2007-10), is the leader nearing the midpoint of the 1,000-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Mackey was the first musher to pull into the checkpoint in Ophir, Alaska. Mackey arrived around 5:30 a.m. PST Wednesday and rested for 15 minutes before heading back out on the trail. Jake Berkowitz arrived in Ophir second and Nicolas Petit third. PHOTOS: Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race The lead mushers are a little over 400 miles into the race.
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SPORTS
March 16, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Rick Swenson won the 1,163-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race for a record fifth time, taking advantage of a blizzard to beat four-time winner Susan Butcher.
SPORTS
March 5, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race began on Sunday in Alaska, with 65 teams making their way through punishing wilderness toward the finish line in Nome on Alaska's western coast 1,000 miles away. Among the competitors were defending champion Dallas Seavey and four-time winners Lance Mackey, Jeff King and Martin Buser. “I love running the dogs, working with the dogs,” said Cindy Gallea, of Wykoff, Minn., whose best finish  among 10 Iditarods was 33rd. “I love being in Alaska, being around the beauty.” PHOTOS: Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race The Iditarod winner gets a new truck and $50,400.
SPORTS
March 11, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Martin Buser, a Swiss native living in Willow, Alaska, held the lead going into the final stretch of the Iditarod Trail sled dog race from Anchorage to Nome.
SPORTS
March 14, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
On what is close to a record pace as the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race entered its second week, Jeff King was first into Eagle Island. King was followed by DeeDee Jonrowe, Rick Mackey and Susan Butcher.
SPORTS
March 3, 2006 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
Growing up in the late 1950s and early '60s, Eric Rogers never missed episodes and reruns of the television series "Sergeant Preston of the Yukon." The show chronicled the fictional adventures of a Northwest Mounted Police officer and his trusty dog, Yukon King, as they tracked down villains in the Canadian wilderness during the gold rush. "I always thought it would be great to have a lead dog named King and go on all these adventures," Rogers said. "But as I grew up and matured ...
NEWS
May 10, 2005 | Jordan Rane, Special to The Times
IT'S just another Monday taping of "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno" at NBC Studios in Burbank. Only the Ohio tourists and Valley groupies filing into Studio 3 for an hour of yuks with Leno don't know it yet, but they are about to come face to face with a time traveler from the early 20th century era of exploration. "We've got Norman Vaughan with us tonight!" pipes Leno, warming up an audience that can't quite place the name. "This man, ladies and gentlemen, is a living legend.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A three-time musher in the Iditarod dog sled race has been found guilty of animal cruelty after officers found some of his dogs dehydrated and so emaciated that their spines and hip bones were visible under their skin. A judge fined David Straub $300 for violating Matanuska-Susitna Borough code. The borough north of Anchorage had previously withdrawn the license that allowed him to keep more than four dogs.
SPORTS
March 6, 2005 | Steve Wilstein, Associated Press
Aside from wild moose trying to stomp the dogs and the risks of plunging into the icy ocean or river in inky darkness, the 1,100-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race is a jaunt in a park. Except this is Mother Nature's Most Extreme Park, not the kind of meadows where most dog lovers take their Rovers to run around. Mushers don't scoop up the poop, fling Frisbees or throw sticks to fetch.
SPORTS
March 18, 2004 | From Associated Press
Mitch Seavey won the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in nine days, 12 hours, 20 minutes and 22 seconds on Tuesday night, his 11th run on the 1,100-mile route from Anchorage to Nome. Seavey, 43, crossed the finish line just before 10:30 p.m. His previous best finish was fourth in 1998. "I'm sort of in disbelief," Seavey said. "I think everybody's happy to have an Alaskan boy win the Iditarod."
SPORTS
March 14, 2003 | From Associated Press
A Norwegian firefighter won the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race on Thursday, enduring extreme wind and cold toward the finish of the grueling, 1,100-mile trek. Robert Sorlie waved to hundreds of cheering spectators as he completed the race in just more than 9 1/2 days. He led his eight-dog team across the line at 1:47 a.m. in near-zero temperatures, finishing ahead of Ramy Brooks and three-time Iditarod champion Jeff King.
SPORTS
March 4, 2003 | From Associated Press
Sixty-four dog teams pushed off Monday on the frozen Chena River, launching the 31st Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race along a new route drawn up because of Alaska's unusually warm winter. Mushers and dogs lining up for the "restart" were enjoying snow, something they didn't have for Saturday's ceremonial start in Anchorage. Amid the din of barking dogs, several thousand fans turned out to witness the Iditarod's first appearance in Fairbanks.
OPINION
March 1, 2003
A week before today's start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, officials redrew the 1,100-mile route from Anchorage to Nome in search of what is usually everywhere this time of year in Alaska: snow. Past races have pitted mushers and their dogs against blizzards and bitter cold. It took the balmiest February on record to redraw the Iditarod for the first time in its 31-year history.
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