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May 23, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
"Arrested Development" fans! Feel a little unprepared for the upcoming online launch of new episodes on Netflix this weekend? Afraid you're a little shaky on your "AD" recall? And "Arrested Development" newcomers: Do you need to get up to speed? Relax. IFC has got your back -- as long as you clear your slate this Saturday. The broadcast cable network is running a marathon of all 53 episodes of the first three seasons of "Arrested Development" starting at 6 a.m. For 26 1/2 hours, you can indulge in every dysfunctional mishap of the Bluth family.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
It's difficult to know what the folks at Funny or Die were thinking when they created the miniseries spoof "The Spoils of Babylon" debuting Thursday on IFC. The all-star cast, which includes Will Ferrell, Kristen Wiig, Tobey Maguire and Tim Robbins, is certainly a draw, as is the Funny or Die pedigree. Founded by Ferrell's and Adam McKay's production team, the comedy website has become a key player in entertainment's digital ecosystem. A video imagining "Downton Abbey's" Michelle Dockery in her next role as a tough cop recently made the rounds, and last fall, Comedy Central launched "Drunk History," based on the Funny or Die Web series.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Funny and trying, "Maron," which premieres Friday on IFC, stars the comedian and podcaster Marc Maron as comedian and podcaster Marc Maron. Among self-referential sitcoms, it is somewhere on (or around) the continuum between "Curb Your Enthusiasm" and "Louie," less fanciful than the first and more conventional than the latter. As a character, he's angrier than Larry David and less sweet than Louis C.K., though they all share an inability not to act from the inconvenient, if honest, impulse.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
Tobey Maquire, star of IFC's "The Spoils of Babylon" has two messages for those who tune in. "I'm sorry and you're welcome," he quipped to reporters at the winter Television Critics Assn. media tour. Maguire was making fun of the intentionally overblown "The Spoils of Babylon," which is a parody of over-the-top miniseries, complete with swelling orchestral music, awkward dialogue and chest-heaving passion. The six-episode project, created and written by Funny or Die's Matt Piedmont and Andrew Steele, represents IFC's most aggressive move yet in planting its comedy flag on the cable landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
IFC announced a development slate of 11 projects on Wednesday, three pilots and eight scripts, and based on their descriptions, the channel appears to be going even more idiosyncratic in its projects. Among the projects possibly coming soon to the channel are an '80s-style soap opera animated entirely with baby dolls and a buddy comedy about a struggling comic-book illustrator befriending a vampire from the future, titled "Jetpackula. " PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments The three pilots IFC has commissioned include "Timms Industrial Piping," the "Dynasty"-inspired series about the residents of Timms Valley, Wis., dealing with the disappearance of the founder and CEO of the town's biggest employer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
IFC, with the mission creep common to basic cable, has been slowly and for some time becoming a comedy network. Its initials stand for Independent Film Channel, and it does still show movies (though not particularly independent ones), but its aspirations are nowadays more defined by its flagship original, "Portlandia,"and reruns of "Arrested Development. " Factoring out the flicks, Comedy Central and Adult Swim are the networks it now most resembles. Friday brings two amusing new series to its lineup: "Comedy Bang!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Break out the plaid flannel and bird-decked tote bags: IFC announced Tuesday that its hit offbeat comedy "Portlandia" will return Feb. 27 -- and it'll be pickled with a heap of guest stars. The fourth season of the satirical series, in which co-creators Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein star as eccentric characters of vegan-infested Portland, Ore., will consist of ten episodes (airing Thursdays at 10 p.m. ET/PT). Though it draws a modest audience, the series has shown year-to-year growth and is the linchpin of the small cable network, which is owned by AMC Networks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
IFC is out to prove that big things can come out of small, quirky shows. Sparked by the success of "Portlandia," the series poking gentle fun at Portland, Ore., and its offbeat residents that has charmed both critics and viewers, the basic cable network has enlisted A-listers Will Ferrell and Ben Stiller as it aggressively ratchets up in hopes of becoming a leader in alternative comedy fare. Ferrell, who is currently filming the sequel to his hit "Anchorman," and frequent partner Adam McKay, are executive producers of "The Spoils of Babylon," which will be produced by Funny or Die, their comedy video website that is an outgrowth of their production company.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
No offense, "Mad Men," nothing personal, "Lost," but the best thing I saw on television last year was "Food Party," a six-episode IFC series that might most easily, if not at all adequately, be described as splitting the difference between Julia Child's "The French Chef" and "Pee-Wee's Playhouse." It began its second season — 20 15-minute episodes showing back to back over 10 weeks — April 27 and it is as strange and delightful, poetic and beautiful, silly and disturbing — and even more ambitious, in its homemade, handmade way — as ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2012
Scott Aukerman's popular podcast, "Comedy Bang! Bang!," has turned the traditional celebrity interview on its head, with zany musical numbers and improv-style games. Aukerman, who also wrote for the cult comedy show "Mr. Show With Bob and David" and co-created the Web series "Between Two Ferns With Zach Galifianakis," talks about the future of comedy and the TV version of "Comedy Bang! Bang!," premiering on IFC at 10 p.m. Friday. "Comedy Bang! Bang!" is part of a new wave of podcasts-turned-TV shows, including Chris Hardwick's "Nerdist" on BBC America and Marc Maron's new show inspired by his "WTF" podcast, that's been green-lit by IFC. Is this the future of comedy development?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
"Shogun," "The Winds of War," "Game of Thrones" and "Under the Dome" are just a few titles in the library of highly regarded novels that have been adapted for television. And then there's "The Spoils of Babylon," the sprawling 22-hour miniseries with an all-star cast based on the massive novel by self-proclaimed "undisputed master of dramatic fiction" Eric Jonrosh. Filmed during the 1970s when "novels for television" were all the rage, "The Spoils of Babylon" revolved around the oil-rich Morehouse family and was packed with scenes of betrayal, greed and forbidden love.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Break out the plaid flannel and bird-decked tote bags: IFC announced Tuesday that its hit offbeat comedy "Portlandia" will return Feb. 27 -- and it'll be pickled with a heap of guest stars. The fourth season of the satirical series, in which co-creators Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein star as eccentric characters of vegan-infested Portland, Ore., will consist of ten episodes (airing Thursdays at 10 p.m. ET/PT). Though it draws a modest audience, the series has shown year-to-year growth and is the linchpin of the small cable network, which is owned by AMC Networks.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
R. Kelly's “Trapped in the Closet” is back, again. The singer's campy hip-hopera will return to IFC  next year with additional installments, the cable network said Tuesday. Although a premiere date or number of episodes hasn't been announced, the network is already celebrating with a marathon of the previous 33 chapters of the series set for Saturday ( episodes are also available for streaming ). The hip-hopera originally began as a five-video series to accompany the melodramatic segment of songs on his 2005 disc, “TP.3 Reloaded.” A bizarre and complex storyline featuring sexual exploits, little people, gossipy drama and Kelly playing multiple characters, "Trapped in the Closet" became a cult hit after it was released.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Into every generation a sketch comedy (sometimes two or three or more) is born. Indeed, we can write the cultural history of our times in their names, from Sid Caesar's "Show of Shows" to the variety shows of Carol Burnett and Flip Wilson, to "Saturday Night Live" and "SCTV," to "Kids in the Hall" and "In Living Color" and "Mad TV," to "Key & Peele" and "Incredible Crew," with many more in between and yet to come. The latest link in this chain of laffs is "The Birthday Boys," premiering Friday on IFC. Its eponymous stars work out of the L.A. Branch of the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater (see also: "Upright Citizens Brigade," the late-'90s Comedy Central series that featured UCB co-founder Amy Poehler)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Bob Odenkirk and David Cross gave voice to several alternative comics from the Los Angeles performing scene on their “Mr. Show with Bob and David,” which ran on HBO for three years in the mid-'90s. Sarah Silverman, Paul F. Tompkins, Mary Lynn Rajskub, Brian Posehn and Scott Aukerman all appeared on or wrote for the show. Now Odenkirk, together with Ben Stiller, is boosting the profile of another L.A. comedy staple, the Birthday Boys, a sketch group that started up in 2007 and regularly played live at L.A.'s Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Fans of feminist bookstores, locally sourced beef and "Battlestar Galactica" rejoice! IFC's comedy series "Portlandia" has been renewed for two more seasons. The series, which stars Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein in a variety of roles representing the oddball residents of Portland, Ore., will get a fourth and fifth season of 10 half-hour episodes apiece, to air in early 2014 and 2015. In its three seasons, "Portlandia" has picked up Peabody and WGA awards and been nominated for an Emmy for writing and directing in a variety series.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
There is British comedy and there is American comedy, and though each influences the other, they do not easily combine. The darts fly in slightly different directions; the rhythms are a hair off, one from the other. Still, with transatlantic mutual admiration among comics stronger than ever, attempts will be made to make it work. Starring and created by David Cross (American, writing with Shaun Pye, British) and set and made in the U.K., "The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret," which debuts Friday on IFC, is just such a venture and a not altogether successful one. The six-episode series features Cross ( "Arrested Development," "Mr. Show With Bob and David")
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010
'Todd Margaret' Where: IFC When: 10 p.m. Friday Rating: TV-MA-L (may be unsuitable for children under the age of 17, with an advisory for coarse language)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
"Arrested Development" fans! Feel a little unprepared for the upcoming online launch of new episodes on Netflix this weekend? Afraid you're a little shaky on your "AD" recall? And "Arrested Development" newcomers: Do you need to get up to speed? Relax. IFC has got your back -- as long as you clear your slate this Saturday. The broadcast cable network is running a marathon of all 53 episodes of the first three seasons of "Arrested Development" starting at 6 a.m. For 26 1/2 hours, you can indulge in every dysfunctional mishap of the Bluth family.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Funny and trying, "Maron," which premieres Friday on IFC, stars the comedian and podcaster Marc Maron as comedian and podcaster Marc Maron. Among self-referential sitcoms, it is somewhere on (or around) the continuum between "Curb Your Enthusiasm" and "Louie," less fanciful than the first and more conventional than the latter. As a character, he's angrier than Larry David and less sweet than Louis C.K., though they all share an inability not to act from the inconvenient, if honest, impulse.
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