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Iggy Pop

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011
Originally scheduled for September, an Iggy Pop outing at the Palladium was nixed when the singer injured his foot on a microphone stand during a performance in Romania. The Stooges frontman, who recovered at his home in the Cayman Islands, is now back in action and ready to slither onstage with both of his feet to regale the crowd with classics like "Search and Destroy" and "Raw Power. " Hollywood Palladium, 6215 Sunset Blvd. 7 p.m. Thu. $39.50. livenation.com.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Todd Martens
Scott Asheton, the rhythmic anchor of the Stooges and a godfather of punk rock, died Saturday of unspecified causes. He was 64. Asheton's death was made public by Iggy Pop , now the sole surviving founding member of the Stooges, a group whose aggressiveness and divisiveness would in the late '60s and early '70s lay the foundation for punk and alternative rock. The Stooges' most recent publicity firm, Nasty Little Man, also acknowledged Asheton's death. “Scott was a great artist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2010 | By Matea Gold and Randy Lewis
Thank goodness the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame voters relented and allowed Iggy Pop and the Stooges into the club. Without the proto-punk rockers on hand, Monday night's awards dinner at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City would have been a pretty tame affair. This year's class of performer inductees, also including ABBA, the Hollies, Genesis and Jimmy Cliff, proved an exceedingly earnest and genuinely appreciative bunch. And then there was Iggy: "This thing is . . . heavy," Pop said, hefting the statue he'd just been handed, then flipping two middle fingers to the crowd of designer-suited men and cocktail-dressed women looking on. "Well, roll over, Woodstock!"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Iggy Pop was living in an efficiency apartment near the Whisky a Go Go when a gangly Brit visited him, seeking a theme song for his first movie. The filmmaker was Alex Cox, a graduate of UCLA film school, and the movie was "Repo Man," which would, after a brief initial release, achieve cult status for its punk bona fides and its comic sci-fi vision of Ronald Reagan-era Los Angeles. In an interview that's one of the welcome extras in a new, high-definition restoration of the feature (available Tuesday from Criterion Collection)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1988 | DON WALLER
Backed by four young British cats who provided his best supporting cast since the halcyon daze of the Stooges, Iggy Pop treated Friday's full house at the Whisky to nearly 90 minutes' worth of raffish riffing, spastic gymnastics and humid sexuality.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1990 | KIRA L. BILLIK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Age hasn't mellowed the high priest of punk, Iggy Pop. Since his early days as the volatile leader of the Stooges, Pop (born James Osterburg on April 21, 1947) has been angry--angry about life's despair and angry at the state of rock music as he knows and loves it. On his latest album, "Brick by Brick," Pop reiterates his anger from the viewpoint of someone who's seen it all and doesn't like much of what he's seen.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1990 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hyundai does not sell little deuce coupes or pink Cadillacs, but that isn't stopping the South Korean auto maker from looking to rock 'n' roll to put the beat back in its American car sales. In an attempt to reach college-age car buyers, Hyundai Motor America said Wednesday that it has hired pop star Iggy Pop for a 20-campus concert tour in the eastern U.S. to promote its new Scoupe sports car.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1999 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Usually when you see Iggy Pop in concert, the music's so loud you need good lungs just to place a drink order. But when the elder statesman of punk previewed his new album in an intimate Viper Room performance on Tuesday, fans were reluctant to speak above a whisper. Rather than acting the familiar prowling madman, the erstwhile Stooges leader sat on a stool, flanked by a bassist and a percussionist, as he sang and played guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
Curly, Moe and Larry aren't the only Stooges emblazoned in American pop culture. There's also Iggy. If they ever get around to a Punk Hall of Fame, he'll be a charter member. As leader of the Stooges in the late '60s and early '70s, Iggy Stooge--as he called himself then--was responsible for albums and concert performances that were unrivaled in their punk outrage and intensity until Johnny Rotten and the Sex Pistols came along in England in 1976.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1996 | SANDY MASUO
For nearly three decades, Pop has personified the id that rages behind the rock psyche. The raw, primal music he made with the Stooges and as a solo artist has influenced several generations of rockers. Through more metallic terrain and some mainstream detours, he's always remained steadfast and true to his own basic rock impulses.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
AUSTIN, Texas --Three days gone, three remaining at the South by Southwest music festival. Already, millions of notes and beats have been played using dozens of tunings and effects. Untold lyrical cliches involving love, nature, haters, enchanted forests and getting paid have been lobbed into unsuspecting (and unforgiving) ears. Within this volume, profound moments of glory have arrived from unexpected places -- little sonic miracles and brief instances of grace that are the primary reason we are here.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Last week, we brought you news that Iggy and the Stooges had completed their first new studio album in 40 years . Now the legendary proto-punk band has provided the first taste from "Ready to Die," due April 30. Posted Tuesday on SoundCloud, "Burn" won't surprise longtime fans of Iggy and the Stooges, whose last album under that name, "Raw Power," came out in 1973. ("The Weirdness," from 2007, didn't feature guitarist James Williamson and was credited simply to the Stooges.) The new song is a typically rowdy riff-rock number with rumbling drums, a swaggering bass line and words from singer Iggy Pop about how "the man of the future is a bully and bruiser.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Forty years on from their landmark proto-punk album "Raw Power," Iggy and the Stooges announced Monday that they've completed a new studio album, "Ready to Die," set for release April 30 through Fat Possum Records. It's the first time Iggy Pop has made a full record with guitarist James Williamson and drummer Scott Asheton since 1973's "Raw Power," which followed a pair of albums without Williamson credited simply to the Stooges. (Asheton's brother Ron was the Michigan band's founding guitarist.)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Mikael Wood
Ke$ha is calling her upcoming album "Warrior," so we can't be surprised to find the pop star busting up chairs and kicking down doors in the music video for the disc's lead single, "Die Young. " But that hardly means that the clip, posted to YouTube on Thursday, fails to raise eyebrows. A fast-moving pastiche of occult imagery, Nat Geo-style wolf footage and lots (and lots!) of black leather, it presents a darker, sexier version of Ke$ha than we saw back in the party-starting "TiK ToK" days.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2012 | By August Brown
When Kesha was born into the pop world in 2009, there was no Carly Rae Jepsen (in America, at least), no One Direction and Justin Bieber still had bangs to make a Renaissance sculptor weep.  How will her glitter, feathered gear and tequila go over in a world where fresh-scrubbed dance-pop is the lingua franca? We're about to find out. The singer has released her first new music since 2010's mini-album "Cannibal," in the form of a new single "Die Young. " It's no major departure from her classic template of ravey pop spiced with gum-smacking raps and occasional vocal acrobatics.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2012 | By Todd Martens
Watching the five-hour opening ceremony for the 2012 London Olympics was a fun game of "Spot The Song. " Mute the volume, and you were likely to miss selections from the Sex Pistols. Or the Jam. Or Adele. Or music from "Monty Python's Flying Circus. "  As directed by celebrated filmmaker Danny Boyle, these Olympics got a tuneful kickoff that traveled at the speed of sound across this history of British pop. Boyle is known for his inventive uses of music in films: "Trainspotting" turned a whole generation on to the music of Iggy Pop (among other legends)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1995 | SANDY MASUO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Friday night's "Rock for Choice" benefit concert at the Hollywood Palladium was designed to commemorate two female health clinic workers who were killed by an anti-abortion activist last December in Brookline, Mass. Considering the seriousness of the occasion, the concert, headlined by Offspring, was a pretty raucous affair--at least after a wobbly start.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | ROBERT HILBURN
This 1973 album runs only 34 minutes, but it stands as one of the pivotal works in rock--an album that links the brute force of the Who with the coming anarchy of the Sex Pistols and the raw self-affirmation of early grunge. "Raw Power" was far too radical for the corporate-rock sensibilities of radio when it was first released by Columbia Records, so it only spent three weeks on the Top 200 sales chart, peaking at No. 183.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011
Originally scheduled for September, an Iggy Pop outing at the Palladium was nixed when the singer injured his foot on a microphone stand during a performance in Romania. The Stooges frontman, who recovered at his home in the Cayman Islands, is now back in action and ready to slither onstage with both of his feet to regale the crowd with classics like "Search and Destroy" and "Raw Power. " Hollywood Palladium, 6215 Sunset Blvd. 7 p.m. Thu. $39.50. livenation.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2010 | By John Payne, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Mike Watt banged up a knee while onstage thumping his bass with legendary proto-punk band the Stooges a few weeks back, so, at least for a while, there won't be any kayaking or morning bicycle rides around his beloved San Pedro for the local art-punk champ. But that doesn't mean he's going to stop playing. "I'm still doing the gigs," he says with a crusty laugh, "I ain't quit, but it's like an ironing board, man. It's totally stiff, and it's just immobilized. But I got more gigs to do. I gotta stay in motion.
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