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Ignacio Ellacuria

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April 25, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING and DIEGO ALEMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Friends and colleagues have taken steps this week to reopen the investigation into the 1989 murders here of six Jesuit priests--a highly publicized, brutal act that caused the United States to reexamine its long, costly involvement in Central American civil wars.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1990 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since the Vietnam war era, students and faculty at Loyola Marymount University on Wednesday held a daylong teach-in to reflect on the brutal murders of six Jesuit priests in El Salvador and the struggle for democracy throughout Central America. The assassination of the Jesuits last November in a predawn attack by Salvadoran army troops at the University of Central America in San Salvador provided the impetus for the teach-in at the Jesuit campus in Westchester.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2011 | By Alex Renderos and Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Salvador and Mexico City -- Rene Emilio Ponce, the once-powerful army general blamed for one of the most egregious atrocities in El Salvador's civil war, the killing of six Roman Catholic priests, has died. He was 64. Ponce died Monday at the Military Hospital in San Salvador, the capital, after being admitted last week in critical condition with heart trouble, El Salvador's Defense Ministry said in a statement. Ponce served as defense minister and army chief of staff in the last half of the Cold War-era conflict that ended in 1992, becoming one of the U.S.-backed government's most important military strategists.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most defining chapters in El Salvador's blood-soaked history--the trial of a senior Salvadoran military officer accused in the killing of six Roman Catholic priests and two of their employees--opened Thursday, mired in bureaucratic disorganization, mind-numbing procedure and doubts that the real criminals are in the dock. This is the first time in El Salvador's history that any soldier has been summoned before a civilian court for human rights abuses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1989 | MICHAEL NOVAK, Michael Novak is a theologian and author who writes a column in Washington.
As events in El Salvador slide away from government control, those who wished for the collapse of the majority Arena government may yet get that wish. They may not, however, have thought through what El Salvador will look like as a plaything of extremist killers, right and left. The murder of six Jesuit priests and their housekeepers in San Salvador Nov.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Alfredo Cristiani said Saturday that the official investigation into last month's assassinations of six Jesuit priests is focusing on the Salvadoran armed forces, but he refused to blame the murders on the military. Cristiani said FBI and Salvadoran investigators have the names of all soldiers posted in the area of Central American University on Nov. 16, the night the priests, their cook and her daughter were shot to death at the Jesuit residence there.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salvadoran President Alfredo Cristiani announced Sunday night that members of the government armed forces committed the Nov. 16 slayings of six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper and her daughter at their Central American University residence in San Salvador. In a nationally televised address, Cristiani said a military board of inquiry has been formed to further investigate the case, which has drawn international condemnation and threats from U.S. Congress members to cut off American aid.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Fernando Jacob, a recent emigre from El Salvador, walked into a popular Salvadoran restaurant and meeting place Friday afternoon, he wanted a lot more than lunch. The 34-year-old Santa Ana resident was looking for fellow countrymen to talk about the violence in their war-torn country and to curse the hundreds of miles between them and loved ones back home.
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