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NEWS
August 3, 1995 | WILLIAM KISSEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few recognize the name. Yet Ike Behar has left an indelible mark on American men's fashion. It was during Behar's 12-year stint designing dress shirts for Ralph Lauren that he created the prototype for Lauren's best-selling "Polo" shirt. Behar was already an established custom shirt-maker in New York when Lauren, a young tie-maker who wanted to add dress shirts to his product mix, bought an 80% share of Behar's company, R & R Custom Shirts.
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NEWS
August 3, 1995 | WILLIAM KISSEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few recognize the name. Yet Ike Behar has left an indelible mark on American men's fashion. It was during Behar's 12-year stint designing dress shirts for Ralph Lauren that he created the prototype for Lauren's best-selling "Polo" shirt. Behar was already an established custom shirt-maker in New York when Lauren, a young tie-maker who wanted to add dress shirts to his product mix, bought an 80% share of Behar's company, R & R Custom Shirts.
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NEWS
June 14, 1985 | BETTY GOODWIN, Times Staff Writer
Now Showing is an occasional feature that spotlights designers who appear with their collections in local stores. Maria Providencia Ferrer has always been extremely particular about men's neckties. Whenever a good-looking man is around and friends say: "Did you see that guy?" Maria usually replies: "No, but that was an ugly tie." Her definition of an ugly tie? "One that's worn in the wrong situation. And I've come to dislike boring ties," she adds.
NEWS
December 18, 1998
Your invitation is in the mail, but don't worry. We've cracked the case of how to dress for holiday parties, with three ways you might be asked to appear: cocktail, black tie and the ever-elusive California casual. Black Tie--Neiman Marcus Hers: Fire-engine red ball gown in Duchess satin from Richard Tyler, $2,000. Matching stole, about 8 feet long, for a mere $750. Classic satin pump dyed to match. His: Single-breasted, one-button wool tuxedo from Le Collezioni by Giorgio Armani, $1,495.
NEWS
December 19, 1993 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Movie: "Six Degrees of Separation." The Setup: Adaptation of the John Guare play that focuses on an Upper East Side New York City couple, Ouisa Kittredge (Stockard Channing, pictured) and her husband, Flanders (Donald Sutherland, pictured), as a supposed college chum of their children, Paul Poitier (Will Smith), enters their ritzy apartment. The Costume Designer: Judianna Makovsky, whose movie credits include "Reversal of Fortune," "Big," "Gardens of Stone" and "Lost Angels."
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | WILLIAM KESSEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Custom-shirt maker Anto Sepetjian probably dresses more of Hollywood's leading men than Giorgio Armani at an Oscar telecast. His 3,500-square-foot Beverly Hills shop, called simply Anto, turns out about 125 custom shirts a week. Harrison Ford wears half a dozen fine Swiss cotton shirts by Anto in "Clear and Present Danger." Nick Nolte courts Julia Roberts in a pinpoint Oxford in "I Love Trouble."
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Men used to be up to their necks in standard dress shirts. Until a few years ago, there was little escape from cardboard-like collars and stiff fabrics. Since companies began loosening their dress codes and instituting casual Fridays, men have found alternatives to those stuffed shirts. Many guys are now sporting shirts that have a relaxed fit, a softer feel and a fashion-forward attitude. Some guys have found that the most comfortable kind of shirt has little or no collar at all.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | William Kissel, Special to The Times
Dodger fans may not approve. But those of us who go to baseball games only to eat foot-long hot dogs and watch the fashion parade in the cheap seats have noticed a disproportionate number of grandstanders either wearing their caps backward--a holdout from the ebbing hip-hop clothing movement--or cutting the bills off altogether.
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