Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIllegal Immigrants
IN THE NEWS

Illegal Immigrants

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
September 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The 2008 Republican platform says the makeup of Congress should be determined by counting only legal residents in the next census, not illegal immigrants. "The integrity of the 2010 census, proportioning congressional representation among the states, must be preserved," says the platform language. "The census," it says, "should count every person legally abiding in the United States in an actual enumeration." "Our mandate is to count all residents regardless of legal status," said Mark Tolbert of the Census Bureau.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
As Republicans seek to improve their standing among Latinos and women, fresh controversies in California could further damage the party with both groups. On Monday, a GOP gubernatorial candidate's inflammatory rhetoric likening illegal immigration to war came to light. The previous day, a conservative website on California politics was launched, featuring a raunchy photo-shopped image of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi - a depiction that prompted the most powerful Republican congressman from California to remove his column from the site.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2010 | Teresa Watanabe and Patrick McDonnell
Galvanized by Arizona's tough new law against illegal immigrants, tens of thousands of marchers took to the streets in Los Angeles on Saturday as the city led the nation in May Day turnout to press for federal immigration reform. As many as 60,000 immigrants and their supporters joined a peaceful but boisterous march through downtown Los Angeles to City Hall, waving American flags, tooting horns and holding signs that blasted the Arizona law. The legislation, which is set to take effect in midsummer, makes it a crime to be in Arizona without legal status and requires police to check for immigration papers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Comparing illegal immigration to a war that threatened the United States' future, GOP gubernatorial candidate Tim Donnelly once exhorted citizens to rise and join his fight to stop people from crossing the border, according to audio of a speech he gave in 2006. "I am a descendant of Jim Bowie, who died at the Alamo," Donnelly, then a leader in the Minuteman border-patrol group, said at a rally in Temecula that year. "It is rumored that he took a dozen Mexican soldiers to their deaths before they finally killed him. How many of you will rise up and take his place on that wall?"
NEWS
April 15, 1985
Tougher immigration laws are favored by 55% of Americans, and 46% believe that illegal immigrants already in this country should be deported, a Media General-Associated Press poll found. And 46% of the poll respondents said political refugees should not be given priority to immigrate over other types of applicants.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2005 | James Flanigan
The Fourth of July weekend seems like a good time to examine some of the heat and rhetoric lately surrounding one of the basic building blocks of our society: immigration. There is widespread concern that too many immigrants are coming in and, worse, that waves of unskilled workers will form a permanent underclass and change the historic dynamic of American society. These are serious matters. Immigration is part of the DNA of America, and it's as necessary today as ever.
OPINION
October 2, 2012
Re "An immigration turning point," Opinion, Sept. 28 It's a boon and also a shame that we have to be told once again by Cardinal Roger Mahony to treat our brothers - in this case immigrants - as brothers. We seem to have lost the feeling for the "human family," as the cardinal states simply and eloquently. One doesn't have to be religious to stand up for the social welfare of all, but this concept is fast becoming an anachronism, one that now unfortunately may be the sole purview of liberals.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Michael McGough
On Tuesday, The Times reported on a proposal in Los Angeles to turn library cards into photo IDs that illegal immigrants could use to open bank accounts and access city services. My first reaction to the story, I must confess, was to crack a joke. In recommending it to Facebook friends, I added the line: “Just don't forget to return your books or your checks might bounce.” But the photo ID library card is a serious idea with serious advantages for illegal immigrants. City Councilman Richard Alarcon, who proposed the concept, noted that in his Northeast Valley district, some immigrants end up being gouged by payday lenders or robbed if they keep large sums of cash on hand.  That wouldn't happen if they could open bank accounts.
OPINION
February 2, 2013
Re "Border issues still divide the public," Jan. 30 It irks me that immigrants lured to the United States by the availability of jobs, and who may be put on a path to citizenship, are the only ones asked to pay penalties. Businesses big and small welcomed them as cheap labor. Was that not breaking the law just as much as crossing borders illegally? The last time immigration reform was in focus nationally, some of us suggested that simply enforcing laws or enacting new ones that penalized the businesses that employed illegal immigrants would be enough.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Ted Rall
Californians' attitudes toward illegal immigrants have become somewhat more tolerant since Proposition 187 passed in 1994. ALSO: Photo gallery: Ted Rall cartoons Americans can't ignore Europe's jobless mess How should Washington pay the bill run up by Sandy? Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall    
NATIONAL
January 5, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - A federal judge has given opponents of Arizona's sweeping anti-illegal-immigration law access to emails, letters and memos between supporters of SB 1070 and legislators to see whether there are racial overtones in the messages. In December, U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton in Phoenix rejected arguments made by two of the law's supporters, who maintained that communications sent to lawmakers who created and supported SB 1070 were confidential. Challengers to SB 1070 called Bolton's ruling a victory because their lawsuit was based partly on allegations that legislators meant to discriminate against Latinos and other people of color.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- A conservative student group that sparked controversy with plans to stage a "Catch an Illegal Immigrant" game at the University of Texas at Austin has canceled the event under mounting pressure from critics.  The Young Conservatives of Texas chapter at the university planned to play the game Wednesday. The object of the game was for students on campus to try to catch club members wearing “illegal immigrant” signs, then turn them in to the Young Conservatives' recruiting table in exchange for  $25 gift certificates.
OPINION
September 17, 2013
Re "State's license bill is driving debate," Sept. 14 I agree with Kern County Sheriff Donny Youngblood: If someone is in the country illegally, it makes no sense to give him the legal ability to drive. Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck states that AB 60, the bill in California that would allow illegal immigrants to obtain driver's licenses, represents "a big step forward in making our roads safer," and that such licensing would reduce the number of hit-and-runs because insured illegal immigrants would have less fear of being caught for driving without having insurance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Adding their voices to a debate that also has engaged media organizations, UCLA's undergraduate student government recently approved a resolution that condemned the use of the term “illegal” when describing  immigrants in the U.S. without legal permission. The so-called “Drop the I-Word” resolution declared, in part, that: "We are aware that certain racially derogatory language used in media, political discourse and other institutional settings has historically bolstered the foundation for racially harmful actions including racial profiling practices, punitive policies targeting socially marginalized groups, hate crimes and violence.” It also said that some students have expressed fears about the appointment of Janet Napolitano as the next UC system president because she helped oversee an expansion of deportations during her recently concluded term as U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Mexican migrants deciding whether to cross the border illegally are driven not just by economics -- but also by their own beliefs about whether United States immigration laws are legitimate and fairly applied, a new study finds. The study, published this month in the American Sociological Review, paints a complicated picture of why people choose to enter the U.S. illegally. Some findings seem unsurprising: Mexican men are more likely to decide to cross into the United States illegally if they think there are few jobs in Mexico, the study shows.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
A federal appeals court Monday struck down a controversial ordinance that sought to ban landlords in the Texas community of Farmers Branch from renting to immigrants who are illegally in the country . The 2008 ordinance, which never took effect, required renters to obtain a city license verifying they were in the country legally, and made it a crime for a landlord to rent to anyone without a license. The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling is hardly surprising, given that Farmers Branch officials argued that the law wasn't trying to regulate immigration; rather, they said, it was merely an attempt to regulate housing.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Hector Becerra
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - It was a short speech, but when Benita Veliz stepped up to the lectern at the Democratic National Convention, she made history. The 27-year-old from San Antonio became the first illegal immigrant to address a national political convention. “Like so many Americans of all races and backgrounds, I was brought here as a child,” she told the crowd Wednesday night. “I've been here ever since.” Veliz, an advocate for the Dream Act - legislation that would pave the way for illegal immigrants to legal residency and citizenship if they go to college or perform military service - talked of being a high-achieving student who graduated early from Jefferson High School, becoming a National Merit Scholar, before graduating from St. Mary's University.
NATIONAL
April 19, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Nebraska legislators handed the governor a political defeat by overriding his veto of a bill that forced conservatives to chose among conflicting priorities, such as care for the unborn, illegal immigrants and even fiscal austerity. On the final day of the state's legislative session Wednesday, lawmakers in the single-chamber, nonpartisan house overrode the governor's veto of a prenatal health bill for illegal immigrants in a narrow 30-16 vote with three present but not voting.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
WASHINGTON -- Future illegal immigration to the U.S. could be cut in half by the Senate-approved bill to overhaul the nation's immigration laws, according to a new analysis Wednesday from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. The new estimate reflects changes in the bill made last week, including the $46-billion “border surge” amendment proposed by Sens. John Hoeven (R-N.D.) and Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) which won over several Republican senators. The Senate's final version of the legislation would cut federal deficits over the next decade by $135 billion as immigrants and their employers pay new fees and taxes, the budget office estimated.
OPINION
June 26, 2013 | Doyle McManus
For a moment there, immigration reform almost looked easy. Republicans, reeling from the defeat of Mitt Romney, realized that they needed to convince Latino voters that the GOP didn't want to deport their grandmothers. In the Senate, a bipartisan "Gang of Eight" wrote a bill that combined tougher border enforcement with a long but clear path to citizenship for illegal immigrants. The bill's chief sponsor, the ruthlessly pragmatic Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.), fought off liberal amendments and embraced conservative changes to attract more Republican support.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|