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NEWS
December 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court on Friday dropped a much-watched Illinois abortion dispute from its schedule of cases to be argued next week because of an out-of-court settlement in the case. The settlement was announced in Chicago last week, eliminating the case that had been viewed as the high court's most likely opportunity to alter its 1973 decision legalizing abortion. As anticipated, the justices granted a request from both sides that Supreme Court arguments be deferred pending a formal settlement.
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NEWS
November 22, 1988 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
Thank goodness the election is over. Now voters in this city that thrives on partisan intrigue and clout can give their undivided attention to the election--the race for mayor. Yes, believe it or not, mayor. It seems like barely yesterday that the nation's third-largest city was embroiled in a raucous, bare-knuckled, racially charged war for control of City Hall. Now, brace for yet another round.
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The Illinois Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the convictions and death sentence of John Wayne Gacy in the sex-related killings of 33 young men and boys. The court set a Jan. 11, 1989, execution date, but that is almost certain to be delayed by further appeals. The ruling was the second time the court has turned down an appeal by Gacy, 46, who was convicted on March 12, 1980.
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | Associated Press
A Cook County circuit judge who pleaded guilty to corruption charges in the Operation Greylord investigation was sentenced Thursday to 11 years in prison and five years' probation. Judge John H. McCollom is one of nine sitting or former judges convicted in the federal investigation of Cook County judicial corruption, which has yielded 59 convictions. One judge was acquitted. McCollom, 64, was ordered to surrender Sept. 29 by U.S.
NEWS
February 23, 1986 | United Press International
The Illinois Supreme Court ruled Friday that the surcharges levied on marriage license fees to fund domestic violence programs are an unfair and illegal tax. The court, in a 4-3 decision, said the levy on marriage license fees was an unconstitutitonal tax on to specific a group; but the minority contended there was a rational relationship between marriage and domestic violence that makes the tax legal.
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