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Illiteracy

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1997 | JOE MOZINGO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tired of seeing young men from their neighborhoods wheel in and out of prison, members of 27 Los Angeles County African American churches have vowed to cut off a pattern they say is fueled by lack of education. After rousing gospel music and prayer Saturday in a South-Central Los Angeles church, more than a hundred parishioners rallied behind proposed legislation that would require former inmates to pass their high school equivalency exam as part of their probation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1996
The House recently passed Senate-endorsed legislation creating a nine-member gambling commission to study the social and economic impact of gambling (July 23). It made me wonder. An estimated loss of $237 billion per year in unrealized earnings is forfeited by those who lack basic learning skills. How many of those gambling might be illiterates trying to find a "means of income"? Functionally illiterate adults cost $224 billion annually in welfare payments, crime, job incompetence, lost taxes and remedial education.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1996 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Aliens, ghosts, vampires, monsters, faith healers, psychic phenomena: Inherently dramatic subjects, they've all been explored and exploited by television over the last four decades. But it's doubtful that paranormal-related programming has ever been more visible than it is today. The recent mainstream success of Fox's supernatural series "The X-Files" has helped unleash a flood of programming surrounding the unexplained.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | BETH DUFF-BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The young woman who already looks middle-aged bends at the waist, hacking at potato leaves with a machete, two babies strapped to her, one at each breast. Over in the shade, under a tree at the refugee camp, men sit drinking corn whiskey, playing cards and gossiping. The scene is typical for rural Africa: While the women do the back-breaking work in the fields, the men argue village politics over a game of cards and a calabash of palm wine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a summer day so gorgeous that it cries out for everyone to flock to the beach, several dozen volunteers are instead convened in a gymnasium to play a mind game about illiteracy, food shortages, plagues, energy depletion, nationalistic rivalries and other global unpleasantries.
MAGAZINE
August 6, 1995
An old Chinese saying suggests that we should be careful of what we ask for, because we may get it. The NAACP wanted legal racial segregation outlawed, believing that it prevented blacks from attaining political and economic equality. Now that segregation is against the law, many blacks remain at the bottom of the economic ladder. In the past, the NAACP was on the right side of the conflict between good and evil. Let's consider today's issues: black-on-black crime, illiteracy and unwanted pregnancies?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1995 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to what they see as a critical under-funding of programs for women and girls, the Ventura County Community Foundation has created the county's first permanent endowment for women. The Women's Legacy Fund, launched Wednesday with $40,000 in pledges and initial cash gifts, will be a community-based resource designed to fund programs that target issues facing women, such as domestic violence, teen-age pregnancy, illiteracy, homelessness and breast cancer.
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