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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
It's best not to overthink the sci-fi love story "Upside Down" and just enjoy its dazzling visuals, dream-like inventiveness and lush romanticism. Writer-director Juan Solanas' dystopian concoction is set in twinned worlds with opposite gravity pulls: the bleak, impoverished "Down Below" and "Up Top," a wealthy hub of industry and exploitation. These inverted planets (they often strikingly share the same frame here), are ruled by the sinister, all-powerful Transworld Corp., whose soaring headquarters connects both worlds and provides the only legal access between them.
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NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
An “amazing” number of people have been scouring through satellite images to spot possible leads in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane. Satellite imagery provider DigitalGlobe said Tuesday that it was uploading more shots of the Gulf of Thailand to its Tomnod website , where anyone can scroll through images and tag what might be rafts, wreckage, oil slicks or other markers. Many people noticing the same thing in the same spot would trigger an alert on the company's end. The website was inaccessible to many visitors on Tuesday because of the "amazing" and “unprecedented” response from the Internet community.
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NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
An “amazing” number of people have been scouring through satellite images to spot possible leads in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane. Satellite imagery provider DigitalGlobe said Tuesday that it was uploading more shots of the Gulf of Thailand to its Tomnod website , where anyone can scroll through images and tag what might be rafts, wreckage, oil slicks or other markers. Many people noticing the same thing in the same spot would trigger an alert on the company's end. The website was inaccessible to many visitors on Tuesday because of the "amazing" and “unprecedented” response from the Internet community.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Todd Martens
Ellen Page has been met with an outpouring of celebrity support after she fought back tears during an emotional speech Friday in Las Vegas in which she came out as gay. Utilizing her totem as an actress, Page early in her address singled out the entertainment industry as one that "places crushing standards on all of us. "  "Not just young people, but everyone," Page said at the  Human Rights Campaign 's inaugural "Time to Thrive" conference...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
In one of many stunning works in Dinh Q. Lê's show at Shoshana Wayne, the portrait of a victim of the Khmer Rouge is interlaced with an image of one of the overgrown temples of Angkor Wat. Lê slices photographs into strips and weaves them together, one image becoming warp and another weft, the two pictures fusing into a riveting, oscillating hybrid. The hair of the young Cambodian girl merges with the long, meandering tree roots that cling to the temple walls. Old and new, near and far converge, faith overlaps with loss, the sacred melts into the profane.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Google Earth's 3D imagery is now available for the iDevices. Or at least some of them. If you have an iPad 2, an iPhone 4S or the latest iPod touch, then you can enjoy swooping virtually through detailed 3D landscapes, like the one of downtown Los Angeles pictured above. Android users have been able to use this feature since late June, but the 3D maps were just made available to Apple users on Thursday. To create the maps, Google uses chartered planes that snap aerial images of every street and structure in major cities from different angles, The Times reported in early June.  So far, about a dozen cities have received the Google Earth 3D map treatment, including Boulder, Colo.; Boston; Charlotte, N.C.; Los Angeles; Portland, Ore.; the San Francisco Bay Area; and Santa Cruz.
OPINION
July 13, 2010 | By Michelle
Thanks for your July 4 Op-Ed regarding the 75th anniversary of Alcoholics Anonymous, "In the end, it's just one drunk talking to another." I too am a sober member of A.A.; my sobriety date is June 16, 2003. The article by "Chaz" was accompanied in the newspaper by an illustration depicting various images supposedly related to A.A. Disturbingly, it included a picture of Jesus Christ, or perhaps some other religious figure with a Christian connotation. My grave concern is that, by publishing Christian art (or art with any religious imagery, regardless of origin)
NEWS
April 20, 2008
800 Words: In the April 6 California section and in the magazine, the 800 Words column about the use of flag imagery in ads and politics referred to Plan Columbia. It is Plan Colombia.
NEWS
September 15, 1988
It is sad to think that physical imagery may have the same vote-garnering importance as ability and intelligence when we select our national leaders. This is due in no small part to photojournalism and television, which project such imagery with multitudinous regularity. Had such media existed in the early 1860s, Stephen A. Douglas, in all probability, would have been our 16th President. ED KYSAR, Reseda
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1986
Alcohol is perhaps the major cause of motor vehicle-related deaths in America, and tobacco is America's foremost cause of lung cancer. Neither of theses dangerous addictive substances pays a role in President Reagan's "drug-testing" program. The Attorney General's Commission on Pornography attempted to find evidence linking sexual imagery in media with violent behavior, but no effort was made to link violent imagery in media with violent behavior. These glaring omissions clearly indicate this Administration intends to impose morality and not enhance human welfare.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In "Endless Love," the gauzy new romantic drama starring Alex Pettyfer and Gabriella Wilde as the meant-to-be-togethers, one thing is certain - sometimes beauty is only skin deep. Directed by Shana Feste and delivering its breaking hearts and fragrant flowers just in time for Valentine's Day, the film is filled with interesting ideas about love, loss, self-esteem and social class, particularly as they define still malleable graduating seniors. But in adapting Scott Spencer's novel for the big screen, Feste and Joshua Safran ("Gossip Girl")
SCIENCE
February 12, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
A satellite orbiting Earth has spotted 55 southern right whales hanging out in the shallow waters off Argentina. It turns out that these particular whales are quite easy to spot from space, said Peter Fretwell of the British Antarctic Survey. They got the name right whales because they were once considered the "right" whales to hunt. They are large and slow, and they spend a lot of time lolling near the surface of calm ocean waters. For this reason, their numbers dropped from a pre-whaling population of 55,000-70,000 to just 300 by the 1920s.  "The same reason they are the right whales to catch makes them the right whales to look for by satellite," said Fretwell.
SPORTS
February 7, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia - Ballerinas danced through gently falling snow. A giant metallic fist hovered overhead, grasping a hammer in its silvery fingers. With its barrage of traditional imagery set to strains of "Swan Lake," the opening ceremony for the 2014 Sochi Olympics could not have been more Russian. "The Sochi Games are our chance to show the entire world the best that our country is proud of," Dmitry Chernyshenko, head of the organizing committee, told the crowd. "Our hospitality, our traditions, our Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | By Reed Johnson
In one of Andrew Moore's photographs of Cuba, on display through Feb. 15 at Couturier Gallery in Los Angeles, a half-dozen men and women are hanging out at an aging ferry terminal. Their postures are casual and unself-conscious, yet they form a quasi-theatrical tableau. One couple appears absorbed in intimate conversation. A single man rests his head on his hands. Through the modest structure's three arched openings, the verdant tropical landscape can be glimpsed. The image is titled "La Espera," a Spanish word that can mean both "wait" and "hope.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Michael Miller
When David St. John makes his annual pilgrimage to Moonstone Beach, he looks at the crashing tide and recalls his incarnations from years past. Sometimes, he envisions the child who splashed with wonder in the tide pools, or the teenager who piled in the car with friends for surfing trips. Other times, he sees the middle-aged poet who used the waves as a recurring backdrop. At different phases of his life, the ocean has signified adventure, mortality or hard-earned wisdom; he's sure that other epiphanies will come.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2013 | By David Ng
A new production of Richard Wagner's opera "Tannhauser" in Germany was reportedly booed by members of the audience who were apparently upset over the use of Nazi imagery in the staging. The opera opened Saturday at the Deutsche Oper am Rhein in Dusseldorf. The German newspaper Der Spiegel reported that audience members started booing about 30 minutes into the production. The staging of Wagner's mythical opera portrays certain characters wearing uniforms of the Third Reich and features a scene reminiscent of a gas chamber.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1996
Regarding "Teenagers Grapple With Meaning of Shakur's Death" (Metro, Oct. 7), I am a bit dismayed as to teens' confusion over the seemingly obvious hows and whys of Tupac's tragic death. His music--and I mean his entire body of music--was insightful but failed to deliver a concrete or productive message to young teens. His lyrics condemned the pain and despair of the street but simultaneously offered an unrepentant glorification of gang life, misogyny and brutality. Like his music, Tupac was a dichotomy; to a critical audience, he expressed disdain over their portrayal of him as an exponent of violence but nevertheless surrounded himself with a lifestyle that invited such criticism.
BOOKS
July 7, 1991
I was half-way through your article entitled "Why Mickey Wears No Pants," when I realized that it was not Mickey Mouse you were writing about. As a result of your word-pictures and my misplaced imagery I "saw" Mickey Mouse in the buff. I conclude with this thought: Mickey Mouse's privates should never go public! ED KYSAR RESEDA
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
This should be a golden age for visual effects in movies. Thanks to the box office success of movies such as "The Avengers" and "Life of Pi," demand for visual effects has never been greater. Studios are spending $100 million or more to put ever more stunning digital images on the big screen. But the companies that create the computer-generated imagery for those blockbusters are struggling as a rising tide of globalization and runaway production takes a toll on an industry that California pioneered.
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