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Immaculate Heart Community

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
During a showdown with the Catholic Church in the late 1960s, Anita Caspary and the Los Angeles order she led, the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, were cast as "rebel nuns" for progressive reforms that included abandoning the nun's habit and suspending a fixed time for prayer. Although the moves were made in response to a call from the Vatican to modernize, conservative Cardinal James Francis McIntyre of the Los Angeles Archdiocese barred the sisters from teaching in the Catholic schools he oversaw.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 27, 2012
Re "Sisters of mercy and dismay," Column, April 22 Steve Lopez got it right. It's all about the Vatican letting those nuns know who's in charge - and it's not Jesus. I was a member of the Immaculate Heart Community of Los Angeles in the 1960s during the Vatican Council's call for renewal of religious life. We studied the documents and voted on the direction the community should go. All the while, Cardinal James Francis McIntyre, L.A.'s archbishop at the time, used every power he had to crush the community's efforts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They believed they were doing God's work. But earthly rules were getting in the way. So, rather than bow to the wishes of the conservative Roman Catholic Church hierarchy in Los Angeles, more than 300 nuns decided 23 years ago to leave their order to form a new type of religious community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
During a showdown with the Catholic Church in the late 1960s, Anita Caspary and the Los Angeles order she led, the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, were cast as "rebel nuns" for progressive reforms that included abandoning the nun's habit and suspending a fixed time for prayer. Although the moves were made in response to a call from the Vatican to modernize, conservative Cardinal James Francis McIntyre of the Los Angeles Archdiocese barred the sisters from teaching in the Catholic schools he oversaw.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1993
The Blythe Street Community will soon undergo a moral renaissance. The Immaculate Heart Community will be bringing various social programs to this area that will educate both the youth and adult population of the street. Our city officials have been aware of this issue and have done little or nothing for years. In contrast, the Immaculate Heart Community has evaluated the situation and realized the need for such programs. Their evaluation and plan of action took only four months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1994 | JEANNETTE REGALADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children ran around the park spraying their faces with water, couples danced to ranchera music and neighbors lined up for a plate of tamales, rice and beans at Vecino a Vecino , a neighborhood celebration Saturday on Blythe Street. Long known as one of the most notorious streets in the San Fernando Valley for its gang-controlled drug trade and violence, residents of the low-income and mostly Latino neighborhood gathered to mark what they believe is a new era.
FOOD
July 15, 2010 | By Emily Dwass, Special to the Los Angeles Times
People visit retreats for many reasons, seeking guidance, rest or refuge from a hectic life. Whatever it is they are hungering for, all of the guests at the Immaculate Heart Center for Spiritual Renewal in Montecito come away well-fed, thanks to the highly lauded meals of Teresa Fanucchi. Her recipes, and the dramatic history of the group that employs her, the Los Angeles-based Immaculate Heart Community, inspired "A Place at the Table," a cookbook published last year by Elevated Lab Press.
OPINION
April 27, 2012
Re "Sisters of mercy and dismay," Column, April 22 Steve Lopez got it right. It's all about the Vatican letting those nuns know who's in charge - and it's not Jesus. I was a member of the Immaculate Heart Community of Los Angeles in the 1960s during the Vatican Council's call for renewal of religious life. We studied the documents and voted on the direction the community should go. All the while, Cardinal James Francis McIntyre, L.A.'s archbishop at the time, used every power he had to crush the community's efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1995 | JEANNETTE DeSANTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing up on Blythe Street, Gisel Valenzuela often wondered if there was more to life than dropping out of school and watching a steady stream of drug deals and drive-by shootings. Maybe it was fate that intervened the day that the women of the Immaculate Heart Community--a nonprofit group made up of former nuns--rented an apartment house in her neighborhood, considered to be the most neglected in the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They believed they were doing God's work. But earthly rules were getting in the way. So, rather than bow to the wishes of the conservative Roman Catholic Church hierarchy in Los Angeles, more than 300 nuns decided 23 years ago to leave their order to form a new type of religious community. That act of conscience by most of the Hollywood-based Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary ended a standoff that had sent ripples of tension through congregations nationwide and to the Vatican.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
No clear, common thread ties a Mexican sex worker in San Francisco to members of a deaf Mormon community in San Diego. Little would seem to connect the former nuns of the Immaculate Heart Community in Santa Barbara with prison inmates at San Quentin or Chino. The same could be said of recovering drug addicts in Culver City and Cambodian refugees in Santa Ana, AIDS patients in West Hollywood and members of a Native American tribe in Santa Rosa. Rick Nahmias saw a connection, though.
FOOD
July 15, 2010 | By Emily Dwass, Special to the Los Angeles Times
People visit retreats for many reasons, seeking guidance, rest or refuge from a hectic life. Whatever it is they are hungering for, all of the guests at the Immaculate Heart Center for Spiritual Renewal in Montecito come away well-fed, thanks to the highly lauded meals of Teresa Fanucchi. Her recipes, and the dramatic history of the group that employs her, the Los Angeles-based Immaculate Heart Community, inspired "A Place at the Table," a cookbook published last year by Elevated Lab Press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1997
The decision of the California Supreme Court to permit cities to prohibit the legal activity of street gangs is a severe blow against civil liberties (Jan. 31). Justice Janice Rogers Brown, in arguing that "the security and protection of the community" take precedence over individual freedom, advances a highly restrictive notion of liberty that has received little endorsement in the historical development of constitutional practices in the U.S. Civil liberties are a crucial part of the social cement that holds a democratic system together.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1995 | JEANNETTE DeSANTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing up on Blythe Street, Gisel Valenzuela often wondered if there was more to life than dropping out of school and watching a steady stream of drug deals and drive-by shootings. Maybe it was fate that intervened the day that the women of the Immaculate Heart Community--a nonprofit group made up of former nuns--rented an apartment house in her neighborhood, considered to be the most neglected in the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1994 | JEANNETTE REGALADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children ran around the park spraying their faces with water, couples danced to ranchera music and neighbors lined up for a plate of tamales, rice and beans at Vecino a Vecino , a neighborhood celebration Saturday on Blythe Street. Long known as one of the most notorious streets in the San Fernando Valley for its gang-controlled drug trade and violence, residents of the low-income and mostly Latino neighborhood gathered to mark what they believe is a new era.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They believed they were doing God's work. But earthly rules were getting in the way. So, rather than bow to the wishes of the conservative Roman Catholic Church hierarchy in Los Angeles, more than 300 nuns decided 23 years ago to leave their order to form a new type of religious community. That act of conscience by most of the Hollywood-based Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary ended a standoff that had sent ripples of tension through congregations nationwide and to the Vatican.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1997
The decision of the California Supreme Court to permit cities to prohibit the legal activity of street gangs is a severe blow against civil liberties (Jan. 31). Justice Janice Rogers Brown, in arguing that "the security and protection of the community" take precedence over individual freedom, advances a highly restrictive notion of liberty that has received little endorsement in the historical development of constitutional practices in the U.S. Civil liberties are a crucial part of the social cement that holds a democratic system together.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
No clear, common thread ties a Mexican sex worker in San Francisco to members of a deaf Mormon community in San Diego. Little would seem to connect the former nuns of the Immaculate Heart Community in Santa Barbara with prison inmates at San Quentin or Chino. The same could be said of recovering drug addicts in Culver City and Cambodian refugees in Santa Ana, AIDS patients in West Hollywood and members of a Native American tribe in Santa Rosa. Rick Nahmias saw a connection, though.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They believed they were doing God's work. But earthly rules were getting in the way. So, rather than bow to the wishes of the conservative Roman Catholic Church hierarchy in Los Angeles, more than 300 nuns decided 23 years ago to leave their order to form a new type of religious community.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1993
The Blythe Street Community will soon undergo a moral renaissance. The Immaculate Heart Community will be bringing various social programs to this area that will educate both the youth and adult population of the street. Our city officials have been aware of this issue and have done little or nothing for years. In contrast, the Immaculate Heart Community has evaluated the situation and realized the need for such programs. Their evaluation and plan of action took only four months.
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