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Immigrant Students

OPINION
April 18, 2003
Re "Rally Backs Effort to Help Immigrant Students," April 13: It seems to me that if a child graduates from a California high school and he or she attended high school in this state for a full three years, that child should be entitled to resident status for tuition purposes regardless of residency status. We should remember that, since 1607, this land has benefited from the best, the brightest, the most ambitious and the most courageous immigrants. There is no reason to change that now -- nor is there any reason to overcharge a child who qualifies academically for the Cal State University system or the University of California and has lived in California continuously for three years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2003 | Daren Briscoe, Times Staff Writer
A flock of balloons symbolizing the dreams of immigrant students was released Saturday in Santa Monica by supporters of legislation intended to aid the process of obtaining citizenship for thousands of such people nationwide. The environmentally conscious, tethered release at Santa Monica High School was part of a coordinated effort by community organizations and civil rights groups across the country to kick off the National Week of Action for Immigrant Students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2002 | JENNIFER SINCO KELLEHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hajimemashite, dozo yoroshiku," William Adams enunciates for his introductory Japanese language class at Roosevelt High School on Los Angeles' Eastside. "That basically means, what's up," he says, eliciting laughs from the room of freshmen and sophomores. Then he gives a somewhat philosophical translation, explaining that Japanese culture is very formal: "Let's begin a new friendship." Adams asks the students to repeat the phrase. Hands on hips, he listens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2001 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Los Angeles Unified School District, home to tens of thousands of immigrant students, is preparing to dismantle a clinic and counseling center that serves newcomers in the city's most crowded corridor. Budget cuts and a space crunch are prompting district officials to rethink the future of the Immigrant Student Assessment and Placement Center at Plasencia Elementary near downtown.
NEWS
May 29, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Every Thursday night in a small conference room at one of America's most prestigious universities, a group of academic researchers talks about the education of some of the nation's most unseen students--its immigrant children. Hands soar into the air. The graduate and doctoral students interrupt, their voices running over one another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to test what may be a new climate of compromise surrounding illegal immigration, U.S. Rep. Howard Berman (D-Mission Hills) plans to introduce legislation today to offer legal status to illegal-immigrant students who want to attend college. In the past, a move to provide a government benefit to a group of illegal immigrants would have been viewed as politically futile.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2001 | ANDREA RAMOS, Andrea Ramos is a staff attorney with the Children's Rights Project of the public interest law firm, Public Counsel
Olga was brought to this country when she was 3 years old. Her only memories are of growing up in East L.A. Despite being afflicted by an incurable illness--Glanzmann's thrombasthenia--that caused her to be hospitalized throughout stretches of her childhood, she managed to become an honor student and was at the top of her high school class. She received offers of admission to both UCLA and UC Berkeley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2001 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Ashley Jackson tried to apply for a driver's license on Wednesday, but ran into a roadblock. She didn't speak Spanish. "Cual es su apellido?" the desk clerk asked, wanting to know her last name. Ashley grew dazed as a dozen other questions rattled by in Spanish. Then she shrugged her shoulders and told the clerk: "Start over." This was no scene south of the border.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2000
Re "Catholic Bishops Call for Immigration Reform," Nov. 17: If the Catholic Church is endorsing more lax restrictions on immigrants entering this country, then the church should be willing to pay for the enormous cost of housing, feeding and educating these people. One would believe that the only reason why the Catholic Church would endorse such a move is due to the fact that most immigrants from south of our border are Catholic, who would in turn fill up the church's coffers. Due to overcrowding, within the next five years every high school in the L.A. Unified will convert to a year-round schedule.
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