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Immigrant Workers

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
For California farmers, the use of undocumented workers is a fact of life. "Bottom line, if I have to verify everyone, I'm not going to be able to harvest my crop," explains one farm owner, Mark Teixeira of Santa Maria. When authorities clamp down, Teixeira and others can't get the labor they need to collect their produce. He said he let 22 acres of vegetables rot last year, and another farmer said he abandoned thousands of dollars of cherries. George Skelton says in Thursday's column that California farms need changes in the country's immigration system that allow them to have a steady workforce.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2013
Join us at 9 a.m. when we talk with Times reporter Richard Winton about a serial rapist who has been targeting Southern California massage-parlor workers for years. The man is suspected in at least 30 “extremely violent” attacks that date a decade across Riverside, Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties. He appears to target immigrant workers and threatens to kill some victims if they report the attacks to police, officials said. Investigators began linking the cases last year, after DNA taken from a 2009 attack in Riverside matched samples from scenes in Gardena, the city of Industry, the Chino Hills area and Fontana.
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NATIONAL
March 30, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Labor and business leaders have agreed to a plan for setting wages for a new category of low-skilled immigrant workers, possibly ending a scuffle that delayed negotiations in the Senate over a sweeping plan to overhaul the country's immigration system, officials involved said. Senators drafting the bill are reviewing the compromise worked out Friday by representatives from the AFL-CIO and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. But the breakthrough may put the bipartisan group of eight senators on track to unveil a bill soon after Congress returns from recess on April 8. "We are very close - closer than we've ever been," Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
BUSINESS
September 11, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez knew all the right things to say in his biggest speech since getting the job a few months ago. "I feel at home," Perez told the thousands of union activists gathered at the AFL-CIO convention in Los Angeles on Tuesday. He then spent the next 40 minutes of the keynote address pledging to raise the minimum wage, protect worker rights and look after middle-class and immigrant workers. "Nobody who works 40 hours a week should have to live in poverty," he told union leaders.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge ordered a payday for three dozen immigrant delivery workers who toiled for years at New York City restaurants without proper wages. U.S. Magistrate Judge Michael Dolinger ordered the owner of several popular Vietnamese cafes to pay more than $4.6 million in back wages and overtime dating to 1999, plus fines and penalties, to former employees who said they had received substandard wages. The court said the 36 workers, all Chinese immigrants, had largely been living off the tips they earned by delivering orders around the city for Saigon Grill restaurants.
OPINION
December 13, 2011
Voters' remorse Re " Congress hits new low in poll of U.S. voters ," Dec. 10 I'm glad that many Americans are beginning to see where the majority of our government's power lies. The sad part is that most incumbent lawmakers win reelection easily and will continue to do so. Many Americans do not put enough thought into whom they elect to Congress, and our country suffers because of it. Congressional committees write our laws, and it is the individual members on these committees who dictate our nation's policies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1989
County officials have begun distributing a new booklet containing information designed to protect immigrant laborers from unscrupulous employers. The Worker's Rights Information booklet was developed by the Orange County Human Relations Commission to encourage workers to document pertinent information about their employers and to keep a log of the hours they work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
In what was seen as a significant test of organized labor's ability to replenish sagging membership by signing up low-wage immigrant workers, more than 1,200 workers at an automobile wheel manufacturing company south of Compton cast votes late Thursday on whether to affiliate with the International Assn. of Machinists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles said Wednesday they had established an "emergency hot line" where day laborers can call for legal help when they are confronted by police or immigration agents at their street-corner hiring sites. The immigration activists have dubbed the hot line "Aguas, La Migra! " which translates roughly as, "Look out, the Immigration Service is coming!"
BUSINESS
November 3, 1994 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's labor unions have a history of stomping on Latino and Asian immigrants, blaming them along with exploitative employers for driving down American wages. In the 1970s, even the revered labor leader Cesar Chavez called illegal immigrants from Mexico a "severe problem," and he routinely reported undocumented farm workers to federal authorities.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Anita Herrera spent years cleaning offices in San Diego, but her boss never gave her a legally required lunch and rest break during a seven-hour shift. When she eventually asked for a breather, her employer cut her hours. So, in 2009, Herrera filed a complaint with the California Labor Commissioner's Office. Investigators corroborated the allegation and got a court order requiring her former employer to pay her $20,000 in penalties for the wage-and-hour law violations.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- The state Assembly passed and sent the Senate a bill aimed at protecting immigrant workers, who complain about pay and working conditions. The measure, AB 263 by Assemblyman Roger Hernandez, passed on a 52-22 vote on Thursday. 'Better burger' chains beef up Hernandez said the legislation is needed to prevent bosses from threatening or actually calling federal agents after a worker, who entered the country illegally, has filed a complaint. "Those that are greatly affected come from the most vulnerable sectors, such as in agriculture, construction, manufacturing and service industries," he said.
NATIONAL
May 14, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
The Senate Judiciary Committee amended the sweeping immigration bill Tuesday to tighten student visa rules in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings. The committee, which is trying to get through the 844-page bill by the end of the week, also fended off changes that threatened to derail the delicate compromise reached by a bipartisan group of eight senators who drafted the legislation. The lengthy meeting of the committee unfolded as a core group of House Republicans turned up the volume against the immigration overhaul.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Poets have been called the "unacknowledged legislators of the world. " (A poet, naturally, coined the phrase.) On Wednesday, a cross-section of L.A. musical street poets and activists -- including members of the bands Ozomatli, Quetzal, La Santa Cecilia, Las Cafeteras and La Chamba -- will be taking part in the May Day International Workers Day and Immigration Reform March in downtown Los Angeles. As they explained at a Tuesday morning press conference, they're urging others to march with them, and they hope to inspire legislators in Washington, D.C., to get busy enacting comprehensive immigration reform and extending human rights protections to migrant workers.
NEWS
March 31, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Key senators trying to negotiate an agreement on immigration reform were divided Sunday on how close they are to reaching a consensus on the legislation. Sens. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), touting a compromise on work visas brokered Friday by union officials and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, predicted that a bipartisan plan could be announced as soon as next week, when the Senate returns from a two-week recess. But Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.)
NEWS
March 30, 2013 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - Labor and business leaders have agreed to a plan for setting wages for low-skilled immigrant workers, possibly ending a scuffle that delayed negotiations in the Senate over a sweeping plan to overhaul the country's immigration system and create a pathway to citizenship for the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants in the country, officials involved in the talks said. Senators drafting the bill are reviewing the compromise, worked out Friday by representatives from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the AFL-CIO, and have not yet decided to include it in their bill, the officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2002 | JENNIFER SINCO KELLEHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roman Vargas' hands were cracked and peeling from working as a dishwasher in a Koreatown restaurant. His bosses were often physically and emotionally abusive, he says, and he was paid $250 a week with no overtime or breaks. Vargas, who emigrated from Vera Cruz, Mexico, in 1999, knew nothing about labor law, and like many other undocumented immigrants working in Koreatown, was afraid of speaking up for his rights.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the first time in the company's 28-year history, Vans Inc. will watch as its 1,400 manufacturing workers vote Friday on whether to form a union at the fashionable canvas shoe maker's largest plant. Not only does the vote signal dissatisfaction among some of the company's mostly Latino employees--who the union says can't afford to pay their share of the company health plan--it may foreshadow increased union activity in Orange County.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Labor and business leaders have agreed to a plan for setting wages for a new category of low-skilled immigrant workers, possibly ending a scuffle that delayed negotiations in the Senate over a sweeping plan to overhaul the country's immigration system, officials involved said. Senators drafting the bill are reviewing the compromise worked out Friday by representatives from the AFL-CIO and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. But the breakthrough may put the bipartisan group of eight senators on track to unveil a bill soon after Congress returns from recess on April 8. "We are very close - closer than we've ever been," Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
NATIONAL
March 22, 2013 | By Brian Bennett and Michael Memoli, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Despite days of huddling behind closed doors, the eight U.S. senators drafting an overhaul of federal immigration laws blew a self-imposed deadline for its completion Friday and packed up to leave Washington as Congress took a two-week spring recess. Several disputes appeared to be to blame for the setback in the bipartisan talks. They include whether to cap the number of visas given to low-skilled immigrant workers at about 200,000 each year, how much those so-called guest workers should be paid, and whether companies and businesses must advertise to hire American workers first.
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