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NEWS
December 31, 1997 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA
After the success of her documentary "Fear and Learning at Hoover Elementary," reported in Life & Style in May, schoolteacher Laura Angelica Simon figured she could have done one of three things: remain an educator, run for local office or make another movie.
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NEWS
December 31, 1997 | PAUL DEAN
Does this old spy they called the Meister have more traitors and moles up his sleeve? Or were his confessions genuine, and this dumpy, former East German agent knows no more than he has admitted of secrets stolen and sold during his decade plumbing U.S. military sources in Berlin? Huseyin Yildirim, as he did in an interview with Life & Style in March, still insists he is empty of information.
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | D. JAMES ROMERO
In January, we told you about the flourishing Asian car club scene--a modern version of Southern California's age-old hot rod culture in which the participants are largely young Asian Americans and the cars are custom, compact imports. We focused on West L.A.'s Kosoku (Japanese for "speed") club, a wholesome group based around the De Vera family (even "Moms" has a custom car). These days, crew leader R.J.
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | KATHRYN BOLD
Amy Waldroop, the 23-year-old Anaheim woman who gave up her college plans to become a foster mother to her three younger brothers, has experienced a series of firsts since her story was published in September: Her first plane ride, to New York to appear on "Montel Williams"; her first visit from Santa Claus, with lots of donated presents, including bikes for her brothers--Adam, 13, Joey, 12, and Tony, 9--and her 3-year-old son, Donavin; and her first shopping spree, with $1,000 donated by
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | JEANNINE STEIN
Since its debut last March, Mode magazine, offering fashion and beauty for plus-size women, has gotten--forgive the pun--bigger. Its starting circulation of 250,000 is up to 360,000 now, and its quarterly status will change to 10 issues a year beginning next March, a year ahead of schedule. Publication directors Nancy Nadler LeWinter and Julie Lewit-Nirenberg couldn't be happier with the publication's progress and feedback from readers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1997 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hanukkah came a little early this year for about 70 Los Angeles kindergartners through fifth-graders Monday. And they are not even Jewish. The children, mostly newly arrived immigrants from Mexico, Central America and South Korea, are enrolled in the Los Angeles Unified School District's Emergency Immigrant Education Program. The program, which runs during vacation breaks at year-round schools, teaches supplemental English to children who seek extra help.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
French legislators this week fought over one of the most divisive and acrimonious questions in this country's political life: what it takes for a person to be considered French. In the tightest legislative battle of its six-month rule, Socialist Prime Minister Lionel Jospin's government moved a step closer to sweeping away most, but not all, of the legal distinctions between the children of French citizens and those of foreigners living in France.
NEWS
June 16, 1997 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A five-year study of the educational progress of 2,400 children of immigrants in San Diego has found that they quickly embrace English over their parents' native tongues--contrary to the fears of anti-immigration groups. The study--part of the largest long-range survey of immigrants' children in the United States--also found that these youths had better grades and lower dropout rates than fellow public school students whose parents were born in the United States.
NEWS
July 6, 1996 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The headline of a recent press release from Rep. Elton Gallegly (R-Simi Valley) makes a bold claim: "Nation's Largest Coalition of Law Enforcement Officers Strongly Endorses Gallegly Education Amendment." Actually, virtually every major police organization, including the nation's largest, has opposed Gallegly's proposal to allow states to ban illegal immigrant children from public schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1996
Immigration reform seems to have put me in the uncomfortable position of confessor-figure for two guys about as far apart as two people can be--my congressman and my next-door neighbor, Rudy. My congressman, Elton Gallegly, got to use the Commentary page (May 14) of The Times to defend his proposal to kick illegal immigrant children out of public schools--along the way, defending himself against those who smell more than a whiff of bigotry in all this high-minded Anglo hysteria. The defense of my neighbor Rudy was a more private thing, coming late at night when we were both pulling into our driveways after work.
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