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Immigrants Los Angeles County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1998 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dispute with the Wilson administration over paperwork has forced Los Angeles County officials to delay benefit checks for hundreds of poor, elderly immigrants in early December. The catalyst for the disagreement is a new $14-million program, known as Cash Assistance Program for Immigrants (CAPI), created by the Legislature to provide benefits to poor, mostly elderly noncitizens who lost their eligibility for federal aid when Congress adopted a welfare reform act in 1996.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1999 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half of the children living in Los Angeles County have parents who are not citizens, a fact that under federal welfare reform costs U.S.-born youngsters substantial benefits and relegates them to "second-class" citizenship, according to a new study. The high rate of Los Angeles County children living in so-called mixed-status families--those with at least one parent who is not a U.S.
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NEWS
February 4, 1997 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Searching for ways to delay the loss of government aid, Los Angeles County has come up with a bureaucratic maneuver that will allow 150,000 poor legal immigrants to continue receiving food stamps until September despite federal directives that cutoffs begin in April. County officials said they can delay the loss of food stamps by conducting a massive re-enrollment campaign for many of the immigrants just prior to the beginning of the scheduled cutoffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1999 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The standing-room crowd was attentive, if perplexed, as the lawyer explained the fine points from an auditorium stage in Los Angeles' Pico-Union neighborhood. Begin putting together rent receipts, paycheck stubs, tax returns and other documentation that show how long you have lived here, advised the attorney, Raquel Fonte of the Central American Resource Center. Do not try to file applications without first consulting with a legitimate legal assistance office.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Searching for ways to delay the loss of government aid, Los Angeles County has come up with a bureaucratic maneuver that will allow 150,000 poor legal immigrants to continue receiving food stamps until September despite federal directives that cutoffs begin in April. County officials said they can delay the loss of food stamps by conducting a massive re-enrollment campaign for many of the immigrants just prior to the beginning of the scheduled cutoffs.
NEWS
October 21, 1992 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Luis Fernando Gatica's image of Los Angeles was drawn from the TV cop shows he watched in his native Guatemala City. From "Hunter," "CHiPs" and others, he thought the city was a clean place that was tough on law and order. But that image crumbled soon after he arrived in Pico-Union in 1990. On his way to work at a fast-food restaurant, Gatica was attacked by a gang that called itself "La 34." They spray painted him and threatened to kill him unless he joined them.
SPORTS
May 28, 1992 | KIRBY LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monday Eguabor wrestled for Nigeria in the 1988 Olympics in Seoul. Two years later, the three-time African champion was wrestling for East Los Angeles College. That may seem like a comedown, but Eguabor, 23, is simply glad to be wrestling. Eguabor, the African champion at 163 pounds from 1986-88, lost to Uwe Westendorf of East Germany, 3-1, in the first round at Seoul and was pinned by Rakhmad Sofiadi of Bulgaria in the second.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1999 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half of the children living in Los Angeles County have parents who are not citizens, a fact that under federal welfare reform costs U.S.-born youngsters substantial benefits and relegates them to "second-class" citizenship, according to a new study. The high rate of Los Angeles County children living in so-called mixed-status families--those with at least one parent who is not a U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1999 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The standing-room crowd was attentive, if perplexed, as the lawyer explained the fine points from an auditorium stage in Los Angeles' Pico-Union neighborhood. Begin putting together rent receipts, paycheck stubs, tax returns and other documentation that show how long you have lived here, advised the attorney, Raquel Fonte of the Central American Resource Center. Do not try to file applications without first consulting with a legitimate legal assistance office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1996 | SHAWN HUBLER
The woman who runs the local nail salon became a citizen last year. Her customers shrieked their congratulations and inundated the Mexican-born manicurist with apple pies and flags. She, on the other hand, talked about the event the way you'd talk about renewing a driver's license or updating a will. Oh, she was proud and respectful but she had, after all, been in this country since 1955.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1998 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dispute with the Wilson administration over paperwork has forced Los Angeles County officials to delay benefit checks for hundreds of poor, elderly immigrants in early December. The catalyst for the disagreement is a new $14-million program, known as Cash Assistance Program for Immigrants (CAPI), created by the Legislature to provide benefits to poor, mostly elderly noncitizens who lost their eligibility for federal aid when Congress adopted a welfare reform act in 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1998 | TOM SCHULTZ
Planners at the San Juan Orientation Immigrant Center are encouraging permanent legal residents and immigrants who wish to apply for U.S. citizenship to take action and avoid application fees that could soon increase. "There's a lot of people who have made the decision to become a U.S. citizen and just haven't gotten around to it," said Felipe Kofman, outreach coordinator at the center. "When [the fee hike] goes into effect, it's going to be final. There's no extension."
NEWS
May 27, 1998 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hunger among immigrant families in two of California's largest counties has increased at an alarming rate since September 1997, when a federal welfare reform act mandated that noncitizens be cut from government food stamps, a study conducted by a nonprofit group for Los Angeles and San Francisco counties has found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Gerard Curran, it was "my own dirty little secret." For a dozen years, the British citizen has been an illegal immigrant, even as he went about his life and found few impediments to a normal existence. Although many view the undocumented exclusively as border-jumpers, the reality is more complex: Almost half the nation's more than 5 million illegal immigrants arrived lawfully and then violated the terms of their entry visas, typically by overstaying.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1997 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's not to like? Unlike all those holidays whose raison d'e^tre seems to be guilt induction, Thanksgiving is about--food! No wonder new Americans take to it like sage to stuffing. Although sage is not necessarily what you will find on local holiday tables. Turkey, yes, and often mashed potatoes as well. But every one of the 100 or so ethnic groups represented in the Valley does Thanksgiving with its own twist.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Searching for ways to delay the loss of government aid, Los Angeles County has come up with a bureaucratic maneuver that will allow 150,000 poor legal immigrants to continue receiving food stamps until September despite federal directives that cutoffs begin in April. County officials said they can delay the loss of food stamps by conducting a massive re-enrollment campaign for many of the immigrants just prior to the beginning of the scheduled cutoffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1995 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a vote marked by emotional debate on just how far Los Angeles County should go to aid its neediest residents, the Board of Supervisors moved Tuesday to seek broad authority to restrict the scope of the county's general relief welfare program. The actions were criticized by social welfare advocates as callous moves that could double or triple the homeless population in Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1991 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They abandoned the street corner hiring sites of the east San Fernando Valley a year ago, tired of the dangers and indignities: unscrupulous employers, hostile merchants, suspicious police, fellow job-hunters desperate enough to fight for a day's work. Roberto Arias and his friends at a city-sponsored day labor site in North Hollywood are still struggling to survive. There are still too many men and not enough jobs.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Searching for ways to delay the loss of government aid, Los Angeles County has come up with a bureaucratic maneuver that will allow 150,000 poor legal immigrants to continue receiving food stamps until September despite federal directives that cutoffs begin in April. County officials said they can delay the loss of food stamps by conducting a massive re-enrollment campaign for many of the immigrants just prior to the beginning of the scheduled cutoffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1996 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a generation, Los Angeles County has become one of the most diverse population centers anywhere. Mass immigration has drastically altered its demographic makeup, creating bustling new enclaves of settlers from Central America and Southeast Asia, Mexico, South Korea and the former Soviet Union, among many other places. Some celebrate this polyglot diversity. Others deplore it.
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