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NEWS
September 29, 1996 | HECTOR TOBAR and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A voter registration drive with few parallels in U.S. history is being paid for and organized not by a political party but by the government--a consequence of a massive yearlong naturalization campaign expected to create 1.2 million new citizens in time for the November election. At naturalization ceremonies from Los Angeles to New York, unprecedented numbers of new citizens are signing up to vote moments before taking the oath of loyalty to the United States. With the U.S.
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NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Since news broke over the weekend that a bipartisan group of senators was working on a plan to legalize the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S. and offer them a path to citizenship (but not without first paying financial penalties), and President Obama unveiled a similar proposal Tuesday promising some relief to immigrants while boosting border security and efforts to combat illegal hiring, readers have sent us more than two dozen letters on the topic. As is often the case with immigration reform, many of the letters take uncompromising yes-or-no positions on the concept itself, largely reflecting the debate in Washington up until this past weekend.
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NEWS
February 15, 1999 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a Maywood storefront on a strip of Slauson Boulevard punctuated with Spanish-language signs for fast-food joints and coin laundries, a group is plotting the next Mexican revolution. Activists there are part of a movement to gain voting rights for millions of Mexicans living in the United States--enough voters to influence Mexico's watershed elections next year. "We can elect the next president of Mexico," said Armando Moreno, a Compton boot salesman and part-time volunteer.
OPINION
March 29, 2007
THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION'S firing of eight U.S. attorneys returns to center stage today with Senate testimony by D. Kyle Sampson, the former aide to Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales. Whatever one thinks of the administration's conduct in this affair, one of its self-justifying arguments is bizarre for reasons that have nothing to do with possible obstruction of justice. Is it possible that Carol C. Lam was a casualty of the nation's broken immigration policy? The dismissal of Lam, the U.S.
OPINION
April 18, 2006
In his immigration Q&A with The Times (April 15), L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa states that public opinion on his stance on illegal immigration is about 500 to 1 against, but that he thinks he was "elected to do what's right, not necessarily what's popular." Does he not realize that he was elected to represent his constituents, not his personal ideology? Perhaps Villaraigosa should remember what happened to former Gov. Gray Davis, another California politician with national political aspirations.
OPINION
June 4, 2000 | David R. Ayon, David R. Ayon writes on U.S., Mexican and Latino politics and is a research associate at the Center for the Study of Los Angeles of Loyola Marymount University
With polls showing him neck and neck with Francisco Labastida, presidential candidate of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, Vicente Fox recently brought his campaign to Mexican communities in the United States. But his rollicking plunge into binational politics was not only reckless but also potentially damaging to future U.S.-Mexico relations.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Since news broke over the weekend that a bipartisan group of senators was working on a plan to legalize the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S. and offer them a path to citizenship (but not without first paying financial penalties), and President Obama unveiled a similar proposal Tuesday promising some relief to immigrants while boosting border security and efforts to combat illegal hiring, readers have sent us more than two dozen letters on the topic. As is often the case with immigration reform, many of the letters take uncompromising yes-or-no positions on the concept itself, largely reflecting the debate in Washington up until this past weekend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1993 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County's two congressmen sat shoulder to shoulder Wednesday, testifying at a well-attended public hearing about their controversial proposals to crack down on the flow of illegal immigrants. Most striking was the presence of Rep. Anthony C. Beilenson (D-Woodland Hills) at the session organized by the Republican Task Force on Illegal Immigration. His appearance before the GOP panel was hailed as evidence that the national issue is outgrowing partisan politics.
OPINION
April 18, 2006
In his immigration Q&A with The Times (April 15), L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa states that public opinion on his stance on illegal immigration is about 500 to 1 against, but that he thinks he was "elected to do what's right, not necessarily what's popular." Does he not realize that he was elected to represent his constituents, not his personal ideology? Perhaps Villaraigosa should remember what happened to former Gov. Gray Davis, another California politician with national political aspirations.
OPINION
June 4, 2000 | David R. Ayon, David R. Ayon writes on U.S., Mexican and Latino politics and is a research associate at the Center for the Study of Los Angeles of Loyola Marymount University
With polls showing him neck and neck with Francisco Labastida, presidential candidate of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, Vicente Fox recently brought his campaign to Mexican communities in the United States. But his rollicking plunge into binational politics was not only reckless but also potentially damaging to future U.S.-Mexico relations.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a Maywood storefront on a strip of Slauson Boulevard punctuated with Spanish-language signs for fast-food joints and coin laundries, a group is plotting the next Mexican revolution. Activists there are part of a movement to gain voting rights for millions of Mexicans living in the United States--enough voters to influence Mexico's watershed elections next year. "We can elect the next president of Mexico," said Armando Moreno, a Compton boot salesman and part-time volunteer.
NEWS
November 23, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after the Republican-controlled Congress passed the harshest immigration controls in a generation, the same legislative leaders have beaten a hasty retreat, in both policy and political gestures. The lawmakers recently restored welfare benefits to legal immigrants, eased the threat of deportation for various refugees and paved the way for large numbers of illegal immigrants to gain permanent residency.
NEWS
September 29, 1996 | HECTOR TOBAR and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A voter registration drive with few parallels in U.S. history is being paid for and organized not by a political party but by the government--a consequence of a massive yearlong naturalization campaign expected to create 1.2 million new citizens in time for the November election. At naturalization ceremonies from Los Angeles to New York, unprecedented numbers of new citizens are signing up to vote moments before taking the oath of loyalty to the United States. With the U.S.
NEWS
October 5, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's ambassador to the United States said Wednesday that American presidential candidates are indulging in demagoguery to capitalize on voter fears of an unstoppable wave of Mexican illegal immigrants. In a breakfast meeting with The Times' Washington Bureau, Ambassador Jesus Silva Herzog decried California Gov. Pete Wilson's aborted presidential campaign for manipulating the immigration issue for political gain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1995 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Congressman Ed Royce emphatically proclaimed on Wednesday that he did nothing wrong. The Fullerton Republican did not hire an illegal immigrant during the 1980s. He employed her husband, a U.S. citizen, and he did not know at first that the man's wife was here illegally. But Royce had inadvertently become the latest politician, the others including Gov. Pete Wilson, who have attacked illegal immigration and then been found to have a past relationship with it.
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