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NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HARLINGEN, Texas - They come from Central America with slips of paper sewn into their pockets bearing names they are sometimes too young to spell. Parents send them with Bibles, rosaries and small wooden crosses in their backpacks. The flood of undocumented immigrants has slowed compared to five years ago - likely due to tighter border enforcement and the economic downturn in the U.S. - but in its place is a new immigration surge even more confounding: children and teenagers traveling through the rugged border lands into south Texas, lured by the promise of safety.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
As Republicans seek to improve their standing among Latinos and women, fresh controversies in California could further damage the party with both groups. On Monday, a GOP gubernatorial candidate's inflammatory rhetoric likening illegal immigration to war came to light. The previous day, a conservative website on California politics was launched, featuring a raunchy photo-shopped image of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi - a depiction that prompted the most powerful Republican congressman from California to remove his column from the site.
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NATIONAL
September 14, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
PHOENIX - At just 20 years of age, Carla Chavarria sits at the helm of a thriving graphic design business, launching branding and media campaigns for national organizations. Some of her projects are so large she has to hire staff. Still, Chavarria has to hop on buses to meet clients throughout Phoenix because Arizona won't give her a driver's license. The state considers her to be in the country illegally, even though she recently obtained a two-year reprieve from deportation under the Obama administration's deferred action program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Comparing illegal immigration to a war that threatened the United States' future, GOP gubernatorial candidate Tim Donnelly once exhorted citizens to rise and join his fight to stop people from crossing the border, according to audio of a speech he gave in 2006. "I am a descendant of Jim Bowie, who died at the Alamo," Donnelly, then a leader in the Minuteman border-patrol group, said at a rally in Temecula that year. "It is rumored that he took a dozen Mexican soldiers to their deaths before they finally killed him. How many of you will rise up and take his place on that wall?"
WORLD
February 27, 2014
BY SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER TIMES PHOTOGRAPHS BY DON BARTLETTI he boy does not understand. His mother is not talking to him. She will not even look at him. Enrique has no hint of what she is going to do. Lourdes knows. She understands, as only a mother can, the terror she is about to inflict, the ache Enrique will feel and finally the emptiness. What will become of him? Already he will not let anyone else feed or bathe him. He loves her deeply, as only a son can. With Lourdes, he is a chatterbox.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1989
I wonder if the current American immigration policy could be improved. Immigration to the U.S. means facing permanently overloaded quotas that never clear up. Maybe it's really impossible for the United States to accept as many immigrants as would like to go, but steps towards a fairer, more effective policy should be taken. ALEJANDRO GUDESBLAT Buenos Aires, Argentina
OPINION
August 29, 2012
Re "Baca may defy proposed Trust Act," Aug. 25 L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca's commitment to violate a proposed state law he disagrees with in favor of a discretionary federal immigration law he prefers smacks of political opportunism, not public service. Baca's statements make clear the need for the governor to sign the Trust Act. Baca misunderstands federal law. It provides only for voluntary cooperation by local law enforcement with immigration agency detention requests.
OPINION
October 9, 2012
Re "Beck eases LAPD deport policy," Oct. 5 Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck wants to distance himself from federal immigration law, which he says is unfair to illegal immigrants suspected of committing petty offenses. We don't understand the reluctance to enforce our laws or the attitude that we don't want to make life inconvenient or uncomfortable for those illegally in this country. While it's obvious that serious and violent criminals deserve priority, petty offenses are quality-of-life issues that affect us all. We have continued to say one thing about immigration while doing another, which only encourages illegal immigration.
OPINION
August 3, 2012
Re "Keeping families intact," Editorial, July 31 The Times calls Congress cowardly for refusing to undertake comprehensive immigration reform. Half of the Senate would like to see undocumented immigrants have a path to citizenship or at least be able to stay on a green card or work visa, and the other half would like to see illegal immigrants deported. Each side is passionate about its position, and the parties, thanks to their primary elections, offer no opportunity for compromise.
OPINION
June 9, 2013
Re "House vote opens immigration divide," June 7 Since House Republicans seem obsessed with littering the path to citizenship with traps, I suggest they turn this process into a reality show. Illegal immigrants would be forced to endure a series of hardships; some would succeed and gain citizenship, but most would give up. As harsh as this sounds, it is no less harsh than what is being proposed. Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) wants to go after the "Dreamers," those young adults who are on the path to a college degree or who have served in our military but lack legal status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | Kurt Streeter
Several of Southern California's most prominent religious leaders held a vigil for immigration reform in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, underscoring a growing interfaith effort to change the nation's laws. Immigrants who are in the United States illegally "need mercy and they need justice," said Archbishop Jose Gomez, welcoming an array of Christian, Jewish and Muslim leaders to the gathering at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. Gomez, who has made changing immigration laws a hallmark of his three-year tenure leading the L.A. Archdiocese, described the current system as "totally broken," adding that federal laws punished families and children unfairly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Healthcare advocates Tuesday urged the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to set aside at least $11 million in additional funding for free medical services for low-income residents - including immigrants lacking legal status - who remain uninsured under Obamacare. Members of the faith-based coalition One L.A., labor groups and community healthcare organizations told reporters and board members that failing to expand a county program to serve thousands more poor and undocumented residents would endanger public health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Scott Gold
Community activists pledged Monday to continue fighting the construction of an immigrant processing center on the Central Coast, despite a bitterly contested vote in which a local city council advanced the project in the face of fervent public opposition. "The fight is not over," said Hazel Davalos, head of the Santa Maria chapter of Coastal Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy, an organization that helps working families in the region. The federal government wants to replace an aging, dilapidated facility in Lompoc - a smattering of trailers that were installed on the grounds of a prison to process immigration cases.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - When prominent Latino activists meet with President Obama, there's one White House staff member present whom many of them have known since she was a child. Julie Chavez Rodriguez grew up handing out leaflets and knocking on doors with her grandfather, Cesar Chavez, whose campaign to organize farmworkers still inspires today's Latino leaders. As deputy director of the Office of Public Engagement, Rodriguez runs Obama's organizing efforts in support of immigration reform and supervises Latino outreach.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By John Sandweg
President Obama recently directed Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson to examine U.S. immigration enforcement policies to see how the department can "conduct enforcement more humanely within the confines of the law. " The answer to the president's directive is surprisingly simple: Homeland Security's Immigration and Customs Enforcement division, known as ICE, should eliminate "non-criminal re-entrants and immigration fugitives" as a priority...
NATIONAL
March 24, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - Working as a Jack in the Box cashier, Marissa Cruz Santos breathed a sigh of relief last year when she qualified for an Obama administration program that defers deportation of young immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children. With high expectations and a freshly minted work permit, Santos, 27, hit the job market, hoping to leverage her new status and a Cal State Fullerton degree into an entry-level office position. But after applying for several jobs near her Riverside home, Santos got only two interviews and no offers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | Steve Lopez
A 10-year-old student from Noble Avenue Elementary School in North Hills visited the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels last week on a diplomatic mission. Jersey Vargas, a fourth-grader, was about to leave for Rome and a possible visit with Pope Francis, but first she wanted to ask Archbishop Jose H. Gomez for his blessing and his help. Jersey said she hoped the archbishop will "help my Dad out, so he can be with me and my family, and we won't be separated ever again. " Her father has been in custody since September, Jersey told me. She said he "was caught driving without a license, and because he wasn't born in the United States, that also didn't help him out….
NATIONAL
March 15, 2014 | By David Zucchino
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. - In almost every sense, Emilio Vicente is an American success story. He grew up a shy kid in the North Carolina mill town of Siler City. His parents, who moved there when he was 6, had little formal education and worked long, punishing shifts at a chicken processing plant to support their seven children. Vicente's strong grades and college boards earned him a full scholarship to the University of North Carolina, one of the nation's most prestigious public universities.
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