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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1986
The Times is at it again with its editorial "INS Displays Hardhearted Zeal" (Oct. 26). You are always against enforcing this law. Now you say the Immigration and Nationalization Service is wrong for its raids on illegal immigrants. It doesn't matter what their age, they are here illegally and are breaking the law by being here. If the INS is hardhearted, then The Times is bleeding-hearted. MRS. LILY M. LEWIS Costa Mesa
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1998 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Willem Wijnbergen, the new managing director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, is free at last to assume his position--a week and a half late. After months of waiting for his papers to be formalized, the 39-year-old Dutch national was informed Tuesday that the Immigration and Naturalization Service had issued a notice of approval. "I half liked my illegal status," Wijnbergen said from his Hancock Park home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1998 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Willem Wijnbergen, the new managing director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, is free at last to assume his position--a week and a half late. After months of waiting for his papers to be formalized, the 39-year-old Dutch national was informed Tuesday that the Immigration and Naturalization Service had issued a notice of approval. "I half liked my illegal status," Wijnbergen said from his Hancock Park home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1996 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Los Angeles sentenced a suspended Immigration and Naturalization Service officer to nearly two years in prison Monday for beating an escapee from the INS detention center in San Pedro. Such abuse "calls into question the whole system of justice," said U.S. District Judge George H. King, who sentenced Paina Moeai, 39, to 21 months in prison and three years of supervised release for violating the civil rights of the prisoner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1996 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Los Angeles sentenced a suspended Immigration and Naturalization Service officer to nearly two years in prison Monday for beating an escapee from the INS detention center in San Pedro. Such abuse "calls into question the whole system of justice," said U.S. District Judge George H. King, who sentenced Paina Moeai, 39, to 21 months in prison and three years of supervised release for violating the civil rights of the prisoner.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1989 | From Times wire services
The Immigration and Nationalization Service announced today that it has levied the largest fine in its history--$150,000--against a Madera labor contractor for knowingly hiring illegal aliens. Howard Ezell, regional director of the INS, said the fine was also the agency's first against an agricultural employer. S & A Farm Contractors was fined $153,250 Wednesday. Ezell said U.S.
NEWS
October 29, 1985 | United Press International
A Soviet seaman who jumped ship in the Mississippi River only to be returned to his vessel because U.S. officials could not understand him was moved to a Coast Guard cutter Monday for interviews to determine whether he wants to defect. The sailor, Miroslav Medvid, a Ukrainian, was taken aboard the cutter for the interview Monday afternoon, accompanied by "Soviet representatives" under a U.S.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress took a long stride Wednesday toward enacting major immigration changes that would allow entry of at least 90,000 more foreigners each year and open the door wider to Western Europeans, who have been all but shut out for a decade. The House Judiciary Committee voted, 23 to 12, for legislation that would increase the overall number of annual visas issued to legal immigrants to 775,000 from the 540,000 in current law and the 630,000 proposed in a Senate-passed measure.
OPINION
January 18, 1998 | Daniel C. Tsang, Daniel C. Tsang, a bibliographer at UC Irvine, is co-founder of Alliance Working for Asian Rights and Empowerment and host of "Subversity," an interview program on KUCI in Orange County
Because of me, the Central Intelligence Agency has had to concede it does spy on Americans. Just last month, the agency had to remove a denial posted on its Web site that it doesn't do this. For it kept a file on me throughout the 1980s and '90s--despite a law against political spying on Americans. Just before Christmas, the CIA revised its Web site. The new version says the CIA can keep files on Americans if they are suspected of espionage or international terrorism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1990 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each morning this week, a crowd of bleary-eyed people pressed forward toward the doors of the Immigration and Nationalization Service office in the San Fernando Valley. Many of the immigrants from Latin America, India and Asia had spent days in line outside the office, sleeping in cars or camped out in the front parking lot. "I've been here since Sunday," a woman named Maria said in Spanish on Thursday. "I came all the way from Palmdale. This is unjust."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1986
The Times is at it again with its editorial "INS Displays Hardhearted Zeal" (Oct. 26). You are always against enforcing this law. Now you say the Immigration and Nationalization Service is wrong for its raids on illegal immigrants. It doesn't matter what their age, they are here illegally and are breaking the law by being here. If the INS is hardhearted, then The Times is bleeding-hearted. MRS. LILY M. LEWIS Costa Mesa
BUSINESS
January 30, 1990 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Foes of the remarkably effective 1986 immigration reform law are hoping that Congress may soon abolish it, or at least pull its teeth, on grounds that recent reports contend it is causing widespread discrimination against Mexican-Americans and other "foreign-looking" workers. The chance of eliminating or even weakening the Immigration Reform and Control Act is negligible, in part because the reports are based largely on anecdotal evidence offered by those opposed to the law.
OPINION
May 30, 2002 | JONATHAN TURLEY, Jonathan Turley teaches constitutional law at George Washington University and has served as counsel in a variety of national security and espionage cases.
The media and the public love a reformer. This may explain the reaction this week to a 13-page letter from FBI agent Coleen Rowley criticizing the investigation of Zacarias Moussaoui. Rowley has been portrayed by national publications like Time magazine in almost breathless terms as a cross between Martin Luther and Annie Oakley.
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