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Immigration Debate

March 30, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
Congressional Republicans are drafting legislation that would require the federal government to develop a plan to add more fencing, sensors, agents and even drones to stop every illegal entry into the United States. The legislative effort offers another example of how a more conservative Congress has steered the immigration debate away from the Obama administration's two-pronged push for reforms and improved border security, and toward strict enforcement of immigration laws. In December, a lame-duck House controlled by Democrats passed the Dream Act, a reform that would have created a path to citizenship for some young illegal immigrants in the U.S., but it was narrowly defeated in the Senate.
September 15, 1993 | ADELA de la TORRE, Adela de la Torre chairs the department of Chicano and Latino studies at Cal State Long Beach.
Immigration reform and welfare reform have become the rallying cries of politicians of all persuasions in their battles to bolster their lagging popularity in the polls. Unfortunately, although estimating the costs and benefits of immigration should be honestly discussed, an emotional furor has overtaken the debate and made rational discussion on immigration impossible.
March 10, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Anti-immigrant sentiment is fueling nationwide increases in the number of hate groups and the number of hate crimes targeting Latinos, according to a watchdog group. The Southern Poverty Law Center, in a report being released today titled "The Year in Hate," said it counted 888 hate groups in its latest tally, up from 844 in 2006 and 602 in 2000. The most prominent of the organizations added to the list, the Federation for American Immigration Reform, or FAIR, vehemently rejected the "hate group" label and questioned the law center's motives.
February 3, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- President Obama's public focus will be on gun violence this week, but behind the scenes he and key administration officials plan to keep pushing for immigration reform. As Obama heads to Minneapolis on Monday to talk about the fight against gun violence, Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano will travel to San Diego and El Paso, Texas, to inspect border security operations at the Southwest border, an aide said Sunday. On Monday and Tuesday, she'll meet with state and local officials to talk about how to secure the border without hindering legal travel and trade.
April 16, 2013 | By Seema Mehta, This post has been corrected. See note below for details.
As a bipartisan group of leaders in Washington prepare to unveil a landmark immigration bill, former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is planning to host a forum at USC focused on the matter that features significant players in the debate. Among the speakers scheduled to participate in the April 30 summit are former Mexican President Vicente Fox, former U.S. Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Michael Bennet (D-Colo.). [For the record, 8:45 a.m., April 16: A previous version of this post misspelled Mexican President Vicente Fox's last name as Vincente.
July 14, 1996
In Frank del Olmo's analysis of the disparity between Latino and other immigrant groups in education and later success and failure (Commentary, July 8), he neglects to mention the single largest difference between Latinos and other groups: bilingual education. Bilingual education began in the '60s and '70s as a good-hearted effort to engineer a better result for the Latino community, but resulted in an erosion of education in English language skills. Other immigrant groups, notably Asians, were placed in schools and forced to mainstream in English-only curricula.
April 2, 2006 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears every Sunday. See current and past Brownstein columns on The Times' website at
Maybe it's the subject matter, but the immigration debate is bringing out the Texan in President Bush. In his approach to immigration, Bush is reprising two distinct elements of his strategy as Texas governor. One of those strategies has improved Bush's odds of signing comprehensive immigration reform. The second has diminished his chances of success.
March 20, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas
The lone Republican senator inclined to support the Obama administration's bid to pass a major immigration overhaul said Friday that if a healthcare bill passes this weekend, the immigration effort is dead for the year. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina is considered a crucial player in the immigration debate -- a Republican prepared to cross party lines and vote for a bill that would provide a path to legal status for the 11 million people living in the U.S. illegally. Graham has spent months working with Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.
May 14, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
It seems that Republicans have long held out hope that Florida might be the state where the GOP could make inroads with Latino voters. However, any effort to woo Latinos was probably dealt a setback this week when Pablo Pantoja, the former GOP director of Latino outreach in Florida, announced he had changed party affiliation. Pantoja explained his decision in a letter that was made public. In the missive, he refers to the “culture of intolerance surrounding the Republican Party today.” He goes on to express concerns about the GOP's reaction to a recent Heritage Foundation report on immigration that was coauthored by Jason Richwine, who has since resigned from the conservative think tank.
November 13, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- A key California Republican is pushing back against House GOP leaders who say there is not enough time before Congress adjourns this year to consider immigration reform. Rep. Jeff Denham (R-Turlock) will make his case to House Republicans behind closed doors Wednesday, trying to build support among lawmakers after Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-Bakersfield), the No. 3 party leader, said last week the issue would have to wait until next year. "This issue is not dead," Denham said Tuesday.
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