Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsImmigration Debate
IN THE NEWS

Immigration Debate

NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Seema Mehta, This post has been corrected. See note below for details.
As a bipartisan group of leaders in Washington prepare to unveil a landmark immigration bill, former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is planning to host a forum at USC focused on the matter that features significant players in the debate. Among the speakers scheduled to participate in the April 30 summit are former Mexican President Vicente Fox, former U.S. Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Michael Bennet (D-Colo.). [For the record, 8:45 a.m., April 16: A previous version of this post misspelled Mexican President Vicente Fox's last name as Vincente.
Advertisement
OPINION
July 14, 1996
In Frank del Olmo's analysis of the disparity between Latino and other immigrant groups in education and later success and failure (Commentary, July 8), he neglects to mention the single largest difference between Latinos and other groups: bilingual education. Bilingual education began in the '60s and '70s as a good-hearted effort to engineer a better result for the Latino community, but resulted in an erosion of education in English language skills. Other immigrant groups, notably Asians, were placed in schools and forced to mainstream in English-only curricula.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2006 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears every Sunday. See current and past Brownstein columns on The Times' website at latimes.com/brownstein.
Maybe it's the subject matter, but the immigration debate is bringing out the Texan in President Bush. In his approach to immigration, Bush is reprising two distinct elements of his strategy as Texas governor. One of those strategies has improved Bush's odds of signing comprehensive immigration reform. The second has diminished his chances of success.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2010
Re: Michael Hiltzik's business column "Turning down the temperature on illegal immigration," Apr. 21: This largely misses the point of the immigration debate. Even if it were correct, as one study suggests, that providing an amnesty would have little effect on the current labor market, one still needs to look at the long-term consequences. The last amnesty in 1986 led to an increase in illegal immigration, resulting in the crisis we face today. Given that outcome, why would we repeat the mistake?
OPINION
May 22, 2007
Re "Immigrants have families too," Opinion, May 19 Bill Ong Hing's points are well taken, but he seems to have forgotten that immigration to a foreign country is entirely voluntary. Your siblings and adult children are that important to you? Stay with them, don't come here. He states that these family members who do come to the U.S. immediately go to work in jobs in which there will be shortages soon. If that is the case, they should apply for their own visas. Oh yeah, and those small businesses these kinship immigrants open?
NATIONAL
March 20, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas
The lone Republican senator inclined to support the Obama administration's bid to pass a major immigration overhaul said Friday that if a healthcare bill passes this weekend, the immigration effort is dead for the year. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina is considered a crucial player in the immigration debate -- a Republican prepared to cross party lines and vote for a bill that would provide a path to legal status for the 11 million people living in the U.S. illegally. Graham has spent months working with Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
It seems that Republicans have long held out hope that Florida might be the state where the GOP could make inroads with Latino voters. However, any effort to woo Latinos was probably dealt a setback this week when Pablo Pantoja, the former GOP director of Latino outreach in Florida, announced he had changed party affiliation. Pantoja explained his decision in a letter that was made public. In the missive, he refers to the “culture of intolerance surrounding the Republican Party today.” He goes on to express concerns about the GOP's reaction to a recent Heritage Foundation report on immigration that was coauthored by Jason Richwine, who has since resigned from the conservative think tank.
OPINION
September 4, 2008
The May immigration raid at Agriprocessors Inc.'s Iowa plant, which resulted in the arrest of 389 illegal immigrants, continues to have abundant negative fallout for the company and its workers. Yet, although the raid garnered national headlines, of more significance to workers everywhere is the ongoing struggle of Agriprocessors' New York employees to organize and the company's effort to thwart them. Three years ago, employees at the meat processing company's Brooklyn distribution center voted to unionize, but Agriprocessors would not honor the vote.
WORLD
May 3, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
MEXICO CITY -- President Obama said Friday that he is “absolutely convinced” Congress will pass new immigration laws this year, projecting more confidence in his ability to work with Republicans from the Mexican capital than he has shown lately at home. In a speech to Mexican students, Obama said he has tried to “lift the shadow of deportation” from young people brought to the United States as children and said he wants to do more thorough comprehensive changes to U.S. immigration policy.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
As Congress continues to discuss comprehensive immigration reform, one of the biggest issues businesses are watching is E-Verify, an online system that checks workers' immigration status. The House version of the bill would make E-Verify mandatory for businesses, as it already is in Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina. Since its inception in 1996, E-Verify has been criticized for being a burden to business - it provided inaccurate results and was too difficult to use for many small businesses focusing on day-to-day operations.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|