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Immigration Documents

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NEWS
February 16, 1992 | Associated Press
Eight people were charged with paying an undercover agent $650,000 to buy immigration documents for illegal immigrants, according to a federal indictment unsealed Friday. The indictment, returned Dec. 17, charges the eight with conspiracy and bribery in an international scheme that brought illegal immigrants--some willing to pay $50,000 for the immigration papers--into Georgia, Florida, New Jersey, Texas, California and North Carolina.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
Decades after that December day in the Guatemalan village, the former soldier could remember the women's screams. Their cries for help, he said, rang out from the church as the soldiers raped them. He recalled the bloodshed and the victims flung into a well, some still alive as they plunged. "At Dos Eres, the people were humble people," the soldier, Cesar Franco Ibanez, said of the 1982 massacre of more than 200 villagers. "They had no weapons. " In a Riverside courtroom this week, Jorge Sosa, a Moreno Valley martial arts instructor, is on trial, accused of lying on his application for U.S. citizenship.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1994
The former manager of a Los Angeles medical clinic became the first employer in Southern California convicted of knowingly accepting counterfeit documents in the hiring of illegal immigrants, the U.S. attorney's office announced Monday. A federal court jury convicted Maria Leticia Ruiz de Cruz of Ontario of two counts of knowingly accepting counterfeit immigration documents, according to Assistant U.S. Atty. Brent A. Whittlesey, who prosecuted the case.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
A federal judge has halted the most controversial elements of Arizona's new immigration law, which had been scheduled to take effect at midnight. U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton on Wednesday halted implementation of the parts of the law that require police to determine the status of people they stop and think are in the country illegally. She also forbade the state from charging anyone for a new crime of failing to possess immigration documents. Bolton's ruling found that the Obama administration was likely to prevail at trial in proving the two provisions, and two other ones in the sweeping law, were an unconstitutional attempt by Arizona to regulate immigration.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
A federal judge on Thursday expressed skepticism about the constitutionality of a key part of Arizona's controversial immigration law, but did not say whether she would prevent the measure from taking effect next week. U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton said during a hearing that the provision that makes it a state crime to lack immigration documents apparently conflicts with a Supreme Court ruling that says states cannot create their own immigration registration systems. John Bouma, a lawyer representing Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer in the seven lawsuits seeking to block implementation of the measure, tried to convince Bolton otherwise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1987
A Tijuana man was arrested Monday at the San Ysidro port of entry after a Chula Vista undercover officer observed him selling phony U.S. and Mexican immigration documents, an Immigration and Naturalization Service official said. Lucas Diaz Cruz, 53, was confronted by the undercover officer, who saw Diaz sitting in a parked car in San Ysidro sorting through immigration documents, according to INS District Director Jim Turnage.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Immigration and Naturalization Service arrested more than 200 illegal aliens who used fake immigration documents to get permanent jobs in the United States, officials said in Atlanta. Those arrested were charged with first-degree forgery under Georgia law and with making false statements under federal statutes.
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
A hearing officer who works for the Justice Department and is not a judge can impose fines for the use of forged immigration documents, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday. In a 2-1 decision, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the fines were civil penalties, not criminal punishment, and did not have to be imposed by a federal judge with life tenure. Federal immigration law since 1924 has made it a crime to forge immigration documents or to knowingly possess or use forged documents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Five illegal immigrants have been charged with running a counterfeit documents ring out of a video store in Anaheim. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested the men Tuesday after an undercover probe. Federal agents say the Mexican nationals made counterfeit Social Security cards and immigration documents. They allegedly collected $70 for each set of fake documents, then sent a bicyclist out to have them made at a nearby house. Lori Haley, a spokeswoman for Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said the probe began in September 2006.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
A federal judge on Thursday expressed skepticism about the constitutionality of a key part of Arizona's controversial immigration law, but did not say whether she would prevent the measure from taking effect next week. U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton said during a hearing that the provision that makes it a state crime to lack immigration documents apparently conflicts with a Supreme Court ruling that says states cannot create their own immigration registration systems. John Bouma, a lawyer representing Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer in the seven lawsuits seeking to block implementation of the measure, tried to convince Bolton otherwise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2010 | By Anna Gorman
At first glance, the photo-copied documents simply looked like government forms and applications. But when Susanne Mori read more closely, she found the story of her grandfather's life as he made his way in America more than five decades ago. Those 23 pages of facts and dates revealed how a young man, Jinbei Mori, left Japan and arrived in San Francisco the month after the 1906 earthquake, how he spent decades working for the Union Pacific...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2009 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
It was a holiday sale for a singular group of beneficiaries -- illegal immigrants who had been thrown out of work. "It makes me feel less guilty for buying all this stuff," said Dolores Arellano, 19, one of hundreds of shoppers who thronged Saturday to the parking lot of American Apparel in downtown Los Angeles. The trendy, L.A.-based clothier sponsored the "Justice for Immigrants" event to benefit some 1,600 employees let go in recent months after federal inspections uncovered discrepancies in their immigration documentation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2008 | Dan Weikel
Travelers arriving in the United States can now use automated kiosks at Los Angeles International Airport to go through immigration and customs without standing in line. Officials on Thursday unveiled the kiosks at four LAX terminals where federal officers process passengers from arriving international flights. Three are in the Tom Bradley International Terminal while Terminals 2, 4, 5, and 7 have one each. Cristina Gamez, a spokeswoman for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, said the devices scan passports, immigration documents, photos and fingerprints of passengers who have qualified for the agency's new Global Entry Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Five illegal immigrants have been charged with running a counterfeit documents ring out of a video store in Anaheim. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested the men Tuesday after an undercover probe. Federal agents say the Mexican nationals made counterfeit Social Security cards and immigration documents. They allegedly collected $70 for each set of fake documents, then sent a bicyclist out to have them made at a nearby house. Lori Haley, a spokeswoman for Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said the probe began in September 2006.
OPINION
December 19, 2005
Re "Out-of-State Students Sue Over Tuition," Dec. 15 This would be a nonissue if our legislators would simply have compassion for undocumented immigrants who had no choice but to sneak into this country with their parents. They have become culturally American, speak English well enough to graduate from high school yet lack immigration documents through no fault of their own. The simple answer: Give law-abiding, undocumented high school graduates legal immigration status and allow them to right the wrongs of their parents by becoming taxpaying citizens who attend college and qualify for decent jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2010 | By Anna Gorman
At first glance, the photo-copied documents simply looked like government forms and applications. But when Susanne Mori read more closely, she found the story of her grandfather's life as he made his way in America more than five decades ago. Those 23 pages of facts and dates revealed how a young man, Jinbei Mori, left Japan and arrived in San Francisco the month after the 1906 earthquake, how he spent decades working for the Union Pacific...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2008 | Dan Weikel
Travelers arriving in the United States can now use automated kiosks at Los Angeles International Airport to go through immigration and customs without standing in line. Officials on Thursday unveiled the kiosks at four LAX terminals where federal officers process passengers from arriving international flights. Three are in the Tom Bradley International Terminal while Terminals 2, 4, 5, and 7 have one each. Cristina Gamez, a spokeswoman for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, said the devices scan passports, immigration documents, photos and fingerprints of passengers who have qualified for the agency's new Global Entry Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2004 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
A former INS contract clerk convicted of destroying thousands of immigration documents was sentenced in Santa Ana on Monday to three years' probation and six months' house detention. A federal prosecutor wanted Leonel Salazar, 34, to go to prison. Instead, U.S. District Judge Alicemarie Stotler said that the sentence was within federal guidelines and that a harsher punishment might have destroyed his family.
OPINION
January 10, 2004
It was appalling to read Simon Cole's absurd diatribe about fingerprinting ("Fingerprinting: a Black Mark," Commentary, Jan. 7). Fingerprinting has nothing whatsoever to do with race. It seems that academics, with little real-world knowledge, will morph any issue to play the race card. Fingerprints individuate people, without regard to any other physical descriptors whatsoever. The General Accounting Office, the National Institute for Science and Technology and the FBI are all on record that fingerprints are the most reliable biometric for determining the true identity of persons.
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