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Immigration Laws

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2005 | Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
Orange County Sheriff's Department officials said Thursday they planned to train as many as 500 deputies to enforce federal immigration laws, becoming the latest Southern California police agency to become more actively involved in immigration issues. The move comes as police departments in Los Angeles and elsewhere have begun tinkering with the strict barrier between officers and immigration officials.
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OPINION
September 30, 2011
This week Alabama became the first of several states that have passed draconian anti-immigrant laws to successfully defend key provisions of its law in court. U.S. District Judge Sharon Lovelace Blackburn found that parts of Alabama's controversial law didn't conflict with the federal government's authority to regulate immigration. That means that, effective immediately, state and local police must arrest and detain anyone they suspect of being in the country illegally. Schools are required to determine the immigration status of students and provide it to district officials.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
This summer, as Elena Kagan quietly moved toward confirmation to the Supreme Court, three major legal disputes took shape that could define her early years. The justices soon will be called upon to decide whether states like Arizona can enforce immigration laws, whether same-sex couples have a right to marry and whether Americans can be required to buy health insurance. Kagan's record strongly suggests she will vote in favor of federal regulation of immigration and health insurance and vote to oppose discrimination against gays and lesbians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2004 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Luis Reyes-Reyes says he fled El Salvador to escape persecution, and if immigration officials determine those fears are legitimate, he could be granted asylum in the United States under the Convention Against Torture. But Reyes-Reyes, 42, is not looking for traditional political asylum. As he and his lawyers put it, he fears returning to his homeland because, for much of his life, he has lived as a woman.
OPINION
June 28, 2006
Re "Immigrants Put to the Blood Test," June 26 What a novel idea -- actually using modern technology to enforce our immigration laws rather than depending on easily forged documents. Bravo to the public servant who came up with that idea. Now, let's use it on a regular basis to give the American people some hope that our government is taking its responsibility to enforce immigration laws seriously. JUDY MCLAUGHLIN Simi Valley
NATIONAL
April 14, 2011 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
Following Arizona's lead, the Georgia Legislature on Thursday passed a strict measure that would empower police to check the immigration status of "criminal" suspects and force many businesses to do the same with potential employees. The bill passed in the waning hours of the legislative session despite critics' outcries. Immigrant advocates threatened a state boycott if it became law, and Georgia's powerful agricultural industry warned, among other things, that federal guest worker programs alone could not provide enough laborers to meet farmers' needs.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Top officials in the office of Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio used its anti-corruption unit to conduct politically motivated investigations, misled the public about a campaign fund that helped Arpaio win reelection and surveilled the Arizona lawman's campaign rivals, according to an internal memo from a high-ranking officer. The 63-page memo, first reported Thursday by the Arizona Republic, blames Arpaio's longtime No. 2 man, Chief Deputy Dave Hendershott, for the alleged criminal wrongdoing.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
The Supreme Court has the fate of same-sex couples in its hands. Will the court stand with equality and rule that marriage, and the benefits that come with it, should be available to all couples regardless of sexuality? Or will it uphold the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and California's Proposition 8? For some same-sex couples, the issue is made even more complicated by our country's immigration laws. In his video Op-Ed “Eric and Juan,” Jens Erik Gould introduces us to a same-sex couple who got married in 2008, during the brief time when gay marriage was legal in California.
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