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Immigration Problem

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OPINION
May 21, 2003
Re "Immigrant Health Tab Disputed," May 18: Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich, who is perhaps the only area politician with any real guts, should be commended for pointing to the primary factor behind the enormous budget deficits in L.A.'s public health-care system, namely, illegal immigration. I disagree, however, that the federal government should pick up the entire bill for illegal immigrants' health care. The various governmental entities of Los Angeles have helped create this monster by providing sanctuary, welfare, housing, day-labor centers and other public benefits for illegal immigrants and by discouraging valid police inquiry into immigration status of minor offenders.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 2, 2013
Re "Border issues still divide the public," Jan. 30 It irks me that immigrants lured to the United States by the availability of jobs, and who may be put on a path to citizenship, are the only ones asked to pay penalties. Businesses big and small welcomed them as cheap labor. Was that not breaking the law just as much as crossing borders illegally? The last time immigration reform was in focus nationally, some of us suggested that simply enforcing laws or enacting new ones that penalized the businesses that employed illegal immigrants would be enough.
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OPINION
February 2, 2013
Re "Border issues still divide the public," Jan. 30 It irks me that immigrants lured to the United States by the availability of jobs, and who may be put on a path to citizenship, are the only ones asked to pay penalties. Businesses big and small welcomed them as cheap labor. Was that not breaking the law just as much as crossing borders illegally? The last time immigration reform was in focus nationally, some of us suggested that simply enforcing laws or enacting new ones that penalized the businesses that employed illegal immigrants would be enough.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
Remember Art Linkletter and “Kids Say the Darndest Things”? Well, it may be time for an updated version called “Politicians Say the Darndest Things.” Reacting to President Obama's move last week to defer deportations of some young illegal immigrants, House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) said Tuesday: “The president's announcement on immigration is -- it puts everyone in a difficult position. I think we all have concerns for those who are caught in this trap, who through no fault of their own are here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1992
The conventions came and went. Neither the Democrats or Republicans mentioned the immigration problem. Every survey shows that all border states and ports of entry struggle with legal and illegal immigrants. We are obligated under the law to take certain immigrants. Why do we allow all their relatives to follow? The Mexican border is a joke. If a group is picked up running through traffic (your pictures), the police are not allowed to turn them over to the immigration authorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1986
Howard Ezell, the western regional commisssioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, has again over-stepped the bounds of propriety, this time to encourage establishment of an immigration legislation lobby. His imprint on the new Americans for Border Patrol is evident, its leadership dominated by his friends. Citizens have every right to organize to influence legislation. But it is not for individual administrators in government service to organize their own special booster groups.
OPINION
April 3, 2006
Your March 31 editorial, "California's enlightened duo," gives too much credit to our two U.S. senators and, by extension, to the Senate itself. In 1986, Congress passed the Immigration Reform and Control Act, which gave amnesty to millions of illegal immigrants. Congress assured us that the act would solve the illegal immigration problem once and for all. Clearly that was not the case. Although I find much to support in the Senate's current proposals, I can assure you that unless there is a provision that will prevent employers from hiring illegal immigrants, we will have only a non-solution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1986
Archbishop Roger Mahoney's protest (Letters, May 18) of Supervisor Mike Antonvich's campaign ad calling attention to Southern California's illegal immigration problem is just the latest installment in a long-running series of actions and public statements casting him as the most openly pro-Hispanic Catholic bishop in modern U.S. history. There certainly is nothing inappropriate in the archbishop giving attention to the largest ethnic group in his territory, but over the years, in Fresno and Stockton as well as in Los Angeles, he has allowed his obsession with Hispanic relations to blind him to the existence of very serious problems that uncontrolled illegal immigration is creating.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
Remember Art Linkletter and “Kids Say the Darndest Things”? Well, it may be time for an updated version called “Politicians Say the Darndest Things.” Reacting to President Obama's move last week to defer deportations of some young illegal immigrants, House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) said Tuesday: “The president's announcement on immigration is -- it puts everyone in a difficult position. I think we all have concerns for those who are caught in this trap, who through no fault of their own are here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1989 | KEVIN O'LEARY, Times Staff Writer
Harold W. Ezell, the top federal immigration official in the West, said Thursday that he would like to remain in his current post at least until November, 1990, and may seek elective office after that. Ezell, the western regional commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, said: "I've expressed interest in finishing Phase Two of the amnesty program, which concludes in November, 1990. . . . If I get the opportunity--great. If not it's been a good experience."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2011 | Hector Tobar
Some bright lights in Washington have come up with another solution to the problem of illegal immigration. This one won't ever become law, because it involves tinkering with the Constitution, and specifically with the 14th Amendment, which declares that everyone born in the U.S. is a citizen. The 14th Amendment was written to overturn an 1857 Supreme Court decision that found U.S.-born people of African descent were not entitled to citizenship. And it's responsible for the citizenship of this columnist, the L.A.-born son of Guatemalan immigrants.
OPINION
September 22, 2010 | By Raul A. Reyes
As an attorney and supporter of immigrant rights, I tried to read with an open mind Charlotte Allen's Sept. 20 Times Op-Ed article, "A birthright that shouldn't be. " Allen argued against the 14th Amendment's provision of birthright citizenship, warned of the costs associated with U.S.-born children of undocumented workers and castigated the Obama administration for failing to secure our borders. The most meaningful part of her essay was what she did not say. Out of more than 1,000 words, she devoted exactly two sentences to offering a solution to our immigration problems.
OPINION
May 21, 2006
Re "Senate Toughens Border Stand, Approves Miles of New Fence," May 18 "Good fences make good neighbors; fences don't make bad neighbors," said Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.). Wow, I didn't realize the Berlin Wall was really a Soviet attempt at being a good neighbor. Fences fail; they always do. Name a single wall or fence that wasn't breached or circumvented. Dozens of tunnels have already been found under the current U.S. border fences. Fences are a waste of time and resources. SEAN HAND Los Angeles It is marginally gratifying to observe our state and national leadership talking individually about the immigration problem, even if they obviously do not agree on all elements of the plan moving forward.
OPINION
April 11, 2006
Re "Immigration Recrimination," April 9 The gulf between Democrats and Republicans, and between the House and the Senate, on the immigration bill cannot be bridged without presidential leadership. It is a tragedy for the country that President Bush has his heart in the right place on this issue but is not likely to be effective because his political muscle is wasted. But he has a chance to restore some lost respect and his reputation in history if he makes a valiant effort to lead on this vital issue.
OPINION
April 3, 2006
Your March 31 editorial, "California's enlightened duo," gives too much credit to our two U.S. senators and, by extension, to the Senate itself. In 1986, Congress passed the Immigration Reform and Control Act, which gave amnesty to millions of illegal immigrants. Congress assured us that the act would solve the illegal immigration problem once and for all. Clearly that was not the case. Although I find much to support in the Senate's current proposals, I can assure you that unless there is a provision that will prevent employers from hiring illegal immigrants, we will have only a non-solution.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2006 | Scott Calvert, Baltimore Sun
Khalo Matabane, a filmmaker, talks of what he calls "a funny incident" of his own making at a restaurant in the well-to-do, mostly white Johannesburg neighborhood of Parkhurst. On his way to the restroom, he crossed paths with a white woman he didn't know. They made eye contact and, he says, he blurted: "I know I am everything you despise -- drug dealer, rapist, serial killer. But I've changed. The only thing I do now is sell drugs."
OPINION
May 21, 2006
Re "Senate Toughens Border Stand, Approves Miles of New Fence," May 18 "Good fences make good neighbors; fences don't make bad neighbors," said Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.). Wow, I didn't realize the Berlin Wall was really a Soviet attempt at being a good neighbor. Fences fail; they always do. Name a single wall or fence that wasn't breached or circumvented. Dozens of tunnels have already been found under the current U.S. border fences. Fences are a waste of time and resources. SEAN HAND Los Angeles It is marginally gratifying to observe our state and national leadership talking individually about the immigration problem, even if they obviously do not agree on all elements of the plan moving forward.
OPINION
June 15, 2003
Re "Immigrants Fear Sweep by Border Patrol," June 6: Gee, I thought I lived in the United States of America, not "Alta California." Now we have the Mexican Consulate organizing a protest in San Juan Capistrano against our Border Patrol enforcing the immigration laws of our country. Of course The Times refers to the protesters as just "immigrants," leaving out the annoying adjective "illegal." What's next? Traffic scofflaws protesting the enforcement of the highway penal code? Criminals organizing to protest the enforcement of drug laws and felonies such as assault, burglary, robbery, rape and murder?
OPINION
June 2, 2005
Re "Employers of Illegal Immigrants Face Little Risk of Penalty," May 29: If we want to reduce illegal immigration, we must sanction the entire spectrum of illegal employers, from the multinational CEO who knowingly contracts with a supplier of undocumented janitors to the middle-class family that hires undocumented cleaners, gardeners and nannies. Supply-side solutions never work: As long as a demand exists, the supply will rise up to meet it. Prohibition proved that. Employers demand cheap, disposable workers, and so the supply comes.
MAGAZINE
August 10, 2003
Thank you for pointing out the downside of our unprecedented experiment with immigration ("Undermining American Workers," by Fred Dickey, July 20). This is destined to become the most important issue in the nation. The routine refrain to the article is that we have always been a nation of immigrants. True, but not like this. We would do well to restore much lower levels of immigration. John Rohe Petoskey, Mich. Dickey's article is based on fallacious reasoning as demonstrated by the following question, which he does not address: Who produces all of the food, apartments, automobiles and other goods and services that undocumented immigrants buy and use?
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