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Immigration Reform

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NATIONAL
June 21, 2013 | Lisa Mascaro and Brian Bennett
The Senate is poised to approve a military-style buildup along the U.S. border with Mexico, doubling the number of Border Patrol agents on the ground and tripling the number of drones overhead -- a $30-billion plan designed to win the votes of as many as 15 Republican senators for the immigration reform bill. The plan would add so many new agents to the Border Patrol -- 20,000 -- that if all were deployed at once, they could be stationed about every 250 feet along the border, stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | Kurt Streeter
Several of Southern California's most prominent religious leaders held a vigil for immigration reform in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, underscoring a growing interfaith effort to change the nation's laws. Immigrants who are in the United States illegally "need mercy and they need justice," said Archbishop Jose Gomez, welcoming an array of Christian, Jewish and Muslim leaders to the gathering at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. Gomez, who has made changing immigration laws a hallmark of his three-year tenure leading the L.A. Archdiocese, described the current system as "totally broken," adding that federal laws punished families and children unfairly.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2011 | Sam Quinones
Few people felt the low turnout at this year's May Day march as acutely as Salvador Ramirez. Ramirez, an illegal immigrant from Jalisco, Mexico, pushed a cart among the few thousand immigrant-rights and labor activists Sunday on Broadway, selling American flags. "It's really bad," said Ramirez, 48, who said he lost his job as an electrician because of his lack of documents and became a street vendor a year and a half ago. About halfway through Sunday's march, Ramirez had sold only about 10 to 15 flags, which he buys for $7.50 a dozen.
OPINION
April 3, 2014
Re "Who should be deported?," Opinion, March 27 It's most telling that John Sandweg, a former head of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, excoriates the inhumanity of current ICE deportation policies. His piece should be required reading for all members of Congress who continue to dither over immigration reform. Sandweg's well-considered remarks bring to mind the hypocrisy of politicians comfortably ensconced in the pockets of big agriculture and big business. If ICE suddenly were to deport all undocumented immigrant workers, the howls from business and agricultural interests would be deafening.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | Kurt Streeter
Several of Southern California's most prominent religious leaders held a vigil for immigration reform in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, underscoring a growing interfaith effort to change the nation's laws. Immigrants who are in the United States illegally "need mercy and they need justice," said Archbishop Jose Gomez, welcoming an array of Christian, Jewish and Muslim leaders to the gathering at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. Gomez, who has made changing immigration laws a hallmark of his three-year tenure leading the L.A. Archdiocese, described the current system as "totally broken," adding that federal laws punished families and children unfairly.
NEWS
July 4, 1997
1776: Declaration of Independence assails King George III for preventing colonies from naturalizing new settlers. 1790: Naturalization reserved for "free white person[s]" with at last two years residence. 1802: Jeffersonian Republicans repeal 14-year residency mandate breifly imposed by rival Federalists. 1848: Treaty ending U.S.-Mexico War guarantees citizenship to Mexican subjects in new territories, including California.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Since news broke over the weekend that a bipartisan group of senators was working on a plan to legalize the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S. and offer them a path to citizenship (but not without first paying financial penalties), and President Obama unveiled a similar proposal Tuesday promising some relief to immigrants while boosting border security and efforts to combat illegal hiring, readers have sent us more than two dozen letters on the topic. As is often the case with immigration reform, many of the letters take uncompromising yes-or-no positions on the concept itself, largely reflecting the debate in Washington up until this past weekend.
NEWS
November 14, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
House Speaker John A. Boehner this week effectively declared immigration reform dead, at least for this year. “I'll make clear we have no intention ever of going to conference on the Senate bill,” the Ohio Republican said Wednesday, referring to to a bipartisan comprehensive immigration bill that cleared the Senate earlier this year. Of course, it didn't take long after Boehner made it official for the blame game to begin. What killed immigration reform? Was is the botched rollout of the Affordable Care Act?
OPINION
May 22, 2013
Re "Hope is paying a visit again," May 18 Once again we have a "cry me a river" story in The Times about the plight of illegal aliens. Hope is not paying a visit again. My son was killed in 2010 after being struck by an illegal alien motorist. Hope is awakening from a nightmare and realizing your loved one is still alive and wasn't one of the more than 4,000 people a year killed by illegal alien drivers. (That's from my own research, based on a study done by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.)
OPINION
July 17, 2013
Re "Foes of border bill focus on House," July 14 I chuckle when I see advocates of curbing immigration attacked for not being truly conservative. We're also attacked as just racists for not being truly liberal supporters of workers and the environment. In reality, immigration cuts across political lines. Some fiscal conservatives want mass immigration for cheap labor. Some social liberals want mass immigration for diversity or to help poor and oppressed foreigners. By contrast, some cultural conservatives want less immigration to preserve America from an unassimilable human wave.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - When prominent Latino activists meet with President Obama, there's one White House staff member present whom many of them have known since she was a child. Julie Chavez Rodriguez grew up handing out leaflets and knocking on doors with her grandfather, Cesar Chavez, whose campaign to organize farmworkers still inspires today's Latino leaders. As deputy director of the Office of Public Engagement, Rodriguez runs Obama's organizing efforts in support of immigration reform and supervises Latino outreach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
A year ago, when the Republican National Committee's searing 2012 election postmortem was released, it was possible to imagine, for a fleeting moment, that the GOP might finally grasp why it has lost the popular vote in five of the last six presidential elections. RNC Chairman Reince Priebus' act of public self-flagellation showed that he was ready to ask tough questions of a party that has alienated the fastest growing demographic segment of voters in this country - Latinos - and failed to woo younger voters, women and gays.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | Steve Lopez
The first day you fast, says Eliseo Medina, your stomach begs you to reconsider. The second day is worse. "Your body starts asking for food," the 68-year-old local activist told me about his fast for immigration reform. "It becomes more difficult and you wonder if it's worth doing this. " But Medina's commitment is an extension of the work he began almost half a century ago, shoulder to shoulder with Cesar Chavez. So there was no letting up last fall, as he made his appeal outside the halls of power in Washington, D.C. When his stomach growled, he drew strength from fellow fasters as they joined hands and prayed.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
OXON HILL, Md. - After steep losses in the 2012 election, there was broad agreement within the Republican Party that its biggest challenge was bridging the divide with key voter groups - minorities, women and young voters - who threw their support behind President Obama, giving him the crucial margin in battleground states. But a year after the GOP's so-called autopsy report, the speeches from the party's leading voices at the Conservative Political Action Conference, known as CPAC, reflected a complex reality: Republicans are still searching for a unified message to reach those groups.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - With their hopes for broad legislation to overhaul immigration policies all but dead for the year, advocates have turned quickly to a new target: Pushing President Obama to take executive action to ease deportations of immigrants in the country illegally. In a coordinated, aggressive and sharp-elbowed campaign, leaders who stood behind the White House not long ago as the president called immigration reform his top second-term priority are now attacking Obama for not doing enough on his own. Dismissing Obama's insistence that his hands are tied by the law, advocates plan to pile on until he relents -- as he did once before in the run-up to an election.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- President Obama insisted Thursday that he's not the "deporter in chief," as critics have labeled him, but the "champion in chief" of a fairer immigration policy. But until Congress passes a new law, Obama said, he is constrained by current statutes in how he treats immigrants who entered the country illegally. “I cannot ignore those laws any more than I can ignore any of the other laws that are on the books,” Obama said. “That's why it's important to get comprehensive immigration reform done this year.” Support for that view among reform advocates is splintering, a fact becoming clearer by the day. The president of the National Council of La Raza, the country's largest Latino advocacy organization, this week coined the “deporter in chief” term for the Democratic president the group has worked with in the past.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2013 | By David Horsey
A glimpse of political oblivion has suddenly inspired at least some Republicans to push for comprehensive immigration reform. But this does not guarantee that, six months from now, an immigration bill will be sent to the president or that, even if it is, Republicans will be saved from approaching demographic doom.  Latinos gave President Obama 71% of their votes in the 2012 election and helped add the electoral votes of Colorado, Florida and...
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
Over the last few years the Republican Party has campaigned hard against comprehensive immigration reform and in favor of tougher internal enforcement and beefed-up security along the U.S. border with Mexico. Now the GOP leadership is hoping to persuade its base to consider a different option: a bipartisan Senate bill that would result in sweeping changes to existing immigration laws. The bill would also create a pathway for millions of immigrants who are illegally in the United States to remain in the country and eventually apply for citizenship.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
CAMBRIDGE, Md. - Democrats will seek to force a House vote on raising the federal minimum wage, party leaders said Thursday, but even getting the proposal to a vote will be an uphill fight. As the minority party in the House, Democrats cannot set the agenda for when bills are brought to the floor. So they will use a procedural tool known as a discharge petition to bring up their proposal to raise the minimum hourly pay to $10.10. Rep. Xavier Becerra (D-Los Angeles), who announced the move at a three-day policy retreat for House Democrats, said the party decided to push the issue after President Obama signed an executive order this week setting a new minimum wage for workers employed by federal contractors.
OPINION
February 8, 2014
Re "Press ahead on immigration," Editorial, Feb. 5 A recent Pew Research Center poll found that only 41% of the American public believes that immigration reform is a top priority, ranking it far behind the more compelling issues of the economy, unemployment and defending the country from terrorism. As American University historian Allan Lichtman observed, "Congress operates on fear and greed. " On this issue, the Democrats are operating out of greed and the Republicans are operating out of fear - of losing the Latino vote.
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