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NATIONAL
June 21, 2013 | Lisa Mascaro and Brian Bennett
The Senate is poised to approve a military-style buildup along the U.S. border with Mexico, doubling the number of Border Patrol agents on the ground and tripling the number of drones overhead -- a $30-billion plan designed to win the votes of as many as 15 Republican senators for the immigration reform bill. The plan would add so many new agents to the Border Patrol -- 20,000 -- that if all were deployed at once, they could be stationed about every 250 feet along the border, stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico.
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NEWS
April 25, 2014 | Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- The push-pull of immigration reform is intensifying as Congress prepares to return to work for one of the last few legislative sessions before the midterm elections. The window for Congress to approve an immigration overhaul is closing, but House Speaker John A. Boehner continues to suggest that action is still possible -- even as he mocked his colleagues who find the hot-button issue too difficult. "Here's the attitude: Ohhhh. Don't make me do this. Ohhhh. This is too hard," Boehner said, mimicking a whining tone, at an Ohio luncheon, according to the Cincinnati Enquirer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2011 | Sam Quinones
Few people felt the low turnout at this year's May Day march as acutely as Salvador Ramirez. Ramirez, an illegal immigrant from Jalisco, Mexico, pushed a cart among the few thousand immigrant-rights and labor activists Sunday on Broadway, selling American flags. "It's really bad," said Ramirez, 48, who said he lost his job as an electrician because of his lack of documents and became a street vendor a year and a half ago. About halfway through Sunday's march, Ramirez had sold only about 10 to 15 flags, which he buys for $7.50 a dozen.
WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
SEOUL -- President Obama plans to honor those who died in the Korean War with a surprising message for a foreign audience: a pitch for immigration reform back home. At a naturalization ceremony Friday for 13 U.S. service members and seven military spouses stationed in South Korea, he will offer a tribute to the contributions that naturalized American citizens have made through military service, according to an official familiar with the event. The ceremony offers a rare setting for a recurrent Obama message: that the U.S. will benefit if immigrants who already make the sacrifices of citizenship can enjoy the rights and privileges that go along with it. The remarks, coming in the middle of an eight-day tour of Asia, will also be the opening message to a South Korean audience worried about national security and looking for reassurance from their ally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | Kurt Streeter
Several of Southern California's most prominent religious leaders held a vigil for immigration reform in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, underscoring a growing interfaith effort to change the nation's laws. Immigrants who are in the United States illegally "need mercy and they need justice," said Archbishop Jose Gomez, welcoming an array of Christian, Jewish and Muslim leaders to the gathering at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. Gomez, who has made changing immigration laws a hallmark of his three-year tenure leading the L.A. Archdiocese, described the current system as "totally broken," adding that federal laws punished families and children unfairly.
NEWS
July 4, 1997
1776: Declaration of Independence assails King George III for preventing colonies from naturalizing new settlers. 1790: Naturalization reserved for "free white person[s]" with at last two years residence. 1802: Jeffersonian Republicans repeal 14-year residency mandate breifly imposed by rival Federalists. 1848: Treaty ending U.S.-Mexico War guarantees citizenship to Mexican subjects in new territories, including California.
OPINION
June 9, 2013 | By Giovanni Peri
As an economist, an immigrant and a scholar of the effects of immigration on the U.S. economy, I find that few pieces of legislation have engaged me more than the proposal for comprehensive immigration reform that the full Senate will take up this week. The most heated debates have been about the path to legal status for those undocumented immigrants who are already in the United States. But this bill does much more than that. It changes the rules regulating the future flow of immigrants and of non-immigrant, temporary foreign workers.
OPINION
May 22, 2013
Re "Hope is paying a visit again," May 18 Once again we have a "cry me a river" story in The Times about the plight of illegal aliens. Hope is not paying a visit again. My son was killed in 2010 after being struck by an illegal alien motorist. Hope is awakening from a nightmare and realizing your loved one is still alive and wasn't one of the more than 4,000 people a year killed by illegal alien drivers. (That's from my own research, based on a study done by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.)
OPINION
July 17, 2013
Re "Foes of border bill focus on House," July 14 I chuckle when I see advocates of curbing immigration attacked for not being truly conservative. We're also attacked as just racists for not being truly liberal supporters of workers and the environment. In reality, immigration cuts across political lines. Some fiscal conservatives want mass immigration for cheap labor. Some social liberals want mass immigration for diversity or to help poor and oppressed foreigners. By contrast, some cultural conservatives want less immigration to preserve America from an unassimilable human wave.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Since news broke over the weekend that a bipartisan group of senators was working on a plan to legalize the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S. and offer them a path to citizenship (but not without first paying financial penalties), and President Obama unveiled a similar proposal Tuesday promising some relief to immigrants while boosting border security and efforts to combat illegal hiring, readers have sent us more than two dozen letters on the topic. As is often the case with immigration reform, many of the letters take uncompromising yes-or-no positions on the concept itself, largely reflecting the debate in Washington up until this past weekend.
OPINION
April 22, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Comprehensive immigration reform is probably dead for yet another year, the victim - once again - of a dysfunctional Congress that can't even reach agreement on the things it agrees on. There is nothing President Obama can do about that, although if therapy were available for political relationships, there'd be a referral waiting to be made. In the meantime, the president still has to administer immigration laws as they exist, and he reportedly is considering dropping his opposition to bond hearings for detained undocumented immigrants.
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- In a last-ditch effort to bring an immigration overhaul to a vote in Congress, House Democrats on Tuesday began targeting key GOP lawmakers in hopes of pressuring House Speaker John A. Boehner to act. The election-year campaign against 30 House Republicans, who have expressed interest in changing the nation's immigration laws, was framed by Democrats as one last opportunity to engage in a legislative debate before President Obama begins...
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Brian Bennett and Lisa Mascaro, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON - After meeting with Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, leaders of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus voiced confidence Wednesday that if the Republican-led House fails to undertake immigration reform this year, the administration will act by executive action. Last month, President Obama promised Latino leaders that his administration would review its deportation policy and enforce laws "more humanely. " Under Obama, deportations hit the 2-million mark, often separating families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | Kurt Streeter
Several of Southern California's most prominent religious leaders held a vigil for immigration reform in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, underscoring a growing interfaith effort to change the nation's laws. Immigrants who are in the United States illegally "need mercy and they need justice," said Archbishop Jose Gomez, welcoming an array of Christian, Jewish and Muslim leaders to the gathering at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. Gomez, who has made changing immigration laws a hallmark of his three-year tenure leading the L.A. Archdiocese, described the current system as "totally broken," adding that federal laws punished families and children unfairly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The family of Cesar Chavez will attend an annual Mass at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels on Sunday to celebrate the life and work of the late labor leader. The Mass, now in its 14th year, will be celebrated beginning at 12:30 p.m. and led by Los Angeles Archbishop Jose H. Gomez. Chavez's son, Paul Chavez, and Arturo Rodriguez, the president of the United Farm Workers union founded by Chavez, are scheduled to speak at the close of the celebration. “Cesar Chavez was a man of prayer and a man of peace,” Gomez said.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Michael McGough
In a dramatic show of support for immigration reform, some U.S. Roman Catholic bishops celebrated Mass Tuesday at the border fence in Nogales, Ariz. The ceremony produced some poignant imagery, including the bishops' distribution of Holy Communion through gaps in the fence's steel slats. In his homily , Cardinal Sean O'Malley of Boston invoked Jesus' parable of the Good Samaritan and the Epistle to the Hebrews. The author of that New Testament letter, he noted, “urges us to practice hospitality, for through it some have unknowingly entertained angels.” Without actually using that hackneyed catchphrase, O'Malley asked: What would Jesus do about immigrants who come to this country without permission?
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
Over the last few years the Republican Party has campaigned hard against comprehensive immigration reform and in favor of tougher internal enforcement and beefed-up security along the U.S. border with Mexico. Now the GOP leadership is hoping to persuade its base to consider a different option: a bipartisan Senate bill that would result in sweeping changes to existing immigration laws. The bill would also create a pathway for millions of immigrants who are illegally in the United States to remain in the country and eventually apply for citizenship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Kurt Streeter
Several of Southern California's most prominent religious leaders gathered in downtown Los Angeles early Friday in a vigil for immigration reform, underscoring a growing interfaith effort to change the nation's immigration laws.  Undocumented immigrants "need mercy and they need justice," said Archbishop Jose Gomez, welcoming an array of Christian, Jewish and Muslim leaders to the vigil, held at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. Gomez, who has made changing immigration laws a hallmark of his three-year tenure leading the L.A. archdiocese, described current laws as "totally broken” and said they were unfairly punishing families and children.
OPINION
April 3, 2014
Re "Who should be deported?," Opinion, March 27 It's most telling that John Sandweg, a former head of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, excoriates the inhumanity of current ICE deportation policies. His piece should be required reading for all members of Congress who continue to dither over immigration reform. Sandweg's well-considered remarks bring to mind the hypocrisy of politicians comfortably ensconced in the pockets of big agriculture and big business. If ICE suddenly were to deport all undocumented immigrant workers, the howls from business and agricultural interests would be deafening.
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