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NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By David Lauter
WASHINGTON - Republican immigration proposals that would leave out a pathway to citizenship for those in the country illegally won't solve the GOP's problems with Latino voters, President Obama's pollster, Joel Benenson, said Wednesday. Republican leaders in the House plan to put forward an outline of an immigration package this week. A centerpiece of their plan would allow most of the estimated 11 million people who entered the country illegally or overstayed their visas to remain and work without fear of deportation.
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NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Brian Bennett and Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON -- President Obama urged Congress in his State of the Union speech to “fix our broken immigration system,” saying both political parties stood to gain by helping millions of undocumented immigrants get a legal foothold in America. “Independent economists say immigration reform will grow our economy and shrink our deficits by almost $1 trillion in the next two decades,” he said. “And for good reason: When people come here to fulfill their dreams - to study, invent and contribute to our culture - they make our country a more attractive place for businesses to locate and create jobs for everyone.” But Obama, aware that House Republicans won't appreciate any hectoring from him, didn't set out any legislative markers, including requiring a pathway to legal status and ultimately citizenship for the estimated 11 million people in the country illegally.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - In a potential breakthrough for long-stalled immigration legislation, House Republicans will consider a proposal this week that would allow millions of immigrants in the country illegally to gain legal status and, in some cases, to eventually become citizens. House Speaker John A. Boehner of Ohio is expected to issue a list of broad immigration "principles" to fellow Republicans during a three-day retreat that begins Wednesday at a Chesapeake Bay resort. For the first time, the list will include a narrow path to citizenship as well as tighter border security and new visas for foreign workers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
A relatively evenhanded and necessarily inconclusive close-up look at immigration wars and identity politics in the Grand Canyon State, "The State of Arizona" (PBS, Monday) features major players and ordinary citizens on each side of the battle as well as some who look at both sides from a confounded middle ground. Directed by Carlos Sandoval and Catherine Tambini (collaborators on the 2004 "Farmingville," about the attempted murder of two Mexican day laborers in a Long Island town), it is set mostly around 2010 and 2011 and centers on the passage of, implementation of and challenges to SB 1070, a still-controversial multi-part anti-illegal-immigration bill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Immigrants fighting deportation in San Francisco will no longer be shackled during most court hearings, according to a settlement reached with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The settlement, which received preliminary approval from a federal judge Thursday, is limited to San Francisco Immigration Court but could affect the way immigrants are treated in other jurisdictions. People held at detention centers in the San Francisco area are transported to court shackled at the wrists, waist and ankles, attorneys for four immigrants wrote in a federal lawsuit filed in 2011.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Immigrants fighting deportation in San Francisco will no longer be shackled during most court hearings, according to a settlement reached with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The settlement, which received preliminary approval from a federal judge Thursday, is limited to San Francisco Immigration Court but could affect how immigrants are treated in other jurisdictions. People held at detention centers in the San Francisco area are transported to court shackled at the wrists, waist and ankles, attorneys for four immigrants wrote in a federal lawsuit filed in 2011.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
When Alva Alvarez gets sick, she buys over-the-counter medicine from the grocery and takes as much as she can until she feels better. The mother of five resorts to this because she can't afford a visit to the doctor to figure out what's ailing her. Although scenarios like this are supposed to disappear as millions of Americans become newly insured under the national healthcare law, Alvarez's situation isn't likely to improve and could get worse....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Cindy Chang, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Immigrants facing deportation are increasingly likely to have their cases dismissed because of mitigating factors such as having U.S. citizen children, according to an analysis by researchers at Syracuse University. In fiscal year 2013, 8.5% of cases closed in immigration court listed “prosecutorial discretion” as the reason for dismissal, compared with 4.7% the previous year. In some courts, at least 20% of case closures involved prosecutorial discretion. Of the roughly 35,000 cases closed in Los Angeles over the last two years, nearly 24% were prosecutorial discretion cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- The head of the California Legislative Latino Caucus proposed Friday that immigrants in the country illegally be allowed to get healthcare coverage through a state program similar to that provided through Obamacare. State Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) said that if the goal is to provide healthcare coverage to all uninsured, then immigration status should not be a factor in the decision. “We've made enormous strides to reduce California's uninsured population with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, but we won't have a truly healthy state until everyone has access to quality, affordable coverage,” said Lara.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy and Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - Immigrants who are in California illegally should have access to health insurance through a state version of the Affordable Care Act, the head of the Legislature's Latino caucus said Friday. State Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) said immigration status should be irrelevant if the goal of the federal law is to provide coverage to the uninsured, so he will introduce legislation to involve the state in providing coverage to those in the country illegally. "Immigration status shouldn't bar individuals from health coverage, especially since their taxes contribute to the growth of our economy," Lara said.
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