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Immunization

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to stem the worst measles epidemic in more than two decades, officials at Los Angeles County health clinics said Thursday that they will begin offering free vaccinations on evenings and Saturdays. The stepped-up effort to eradicate the disease--which has already taken the lives of at least six Californians this year--was announced at a press conference at the Hubert H.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1993 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Haunted by memories of a recent measles epidemic that took 40 young lives, public and private health workers in Los Angeles County are in the midst of another drive to vaccinate preschool children for measles, whooping cough and other preventable childhood diseases. Once again, they are reporting disappointing results.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democratic Party officials are blaming politics for Orange County's withdrawal of support for free child-immunization drives scheduled next month and sponsored by local Democrats. In letters sent to county leaders and to U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer, party members said they believe that one aide--and possibly two--for the all-Republican Board of Supervisors pressured the county Health Care Agency to renege on pledges of vaccine and other supplies for use during the Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1999
A new state law that took effect this summer mandates that students cannot enter, advance to or repeat the seventh grade if they have not started the three-dose hepatitis B series, administered over four to six months. The new law is intended to catch older children who missed earlier inoculations and are approaching the years when the disease is often contracted. Officials said many children don't get the immunization shots they need on time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2003 | From Associated Press
California's health maintenance organizations do a good job caring for heart patients and providing immunization for children but don't do as well serving the needs of the mentally ill, according to a state survey released Tuesday. The annual HMO "Quality of Care Report Card," from the state's Office of the Patient Advocate, ranks the 10 largest health maintenance organizations based on 39,000 customer reports. The survey also includes some of the larger doctor groups in metropolitan areas.
SCIENCE
August 2, 2003 | From Reuters
Polio could be eradicated by 2005 if governments in four key countries give full backing to extensive immunization campaigns, according to officials from the World Health Organization. The disease might never be conquered unless a window of opportunity offered by a new flow of funds is used now, the officials said Tuesday in Geneva. "Polio eradication is a top priority," said new WHO Director-General Lee Jong-wook. "We have eliminated it from almost every country in the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2004 | Joy Buchanan, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 1,400 people walked by tranquil water fountains and statues of biblical figures at the Crystal Cathedral on Wednesday, just before they passed a sign reading, "Welcome to the Smallpox Exercise." The Orange County Health Care Agency, in conjunction with the county's American Red Cross chapter and other organizations, staged the mock smallpox immunization drill at the cathedral in Garden Grove; no one was actually given the vaccine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1993 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small but determined band of medical students will set up shop this afternoon in a Wilmington park, launching a drive through the weekend to give free vaccinations to hundreds of children. The students will be armed with syringes, coolers brimming with vaccines, public-health information and raffle prizes such as stuffed animals. Their goal: to improve vaccination rates in a community where, they report, too few children are getting immunized against diseases ranging from measles to polio.
HEALTH
September 18, 2000 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
If you're the type who likes to get a flu shot early in the fall, take note. Most people are going to have to wait until November to get the vaccine. Vaccination campaigns that normally begin in October have been pushed back a month because of difficulties producing vaccines against new flu strains. Health officials, meanwhile, are hoping a shortage doesn't develop. With the four manufacturers of U.S.
NEWS
April 20, 1994 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing the distressingly low rate of infant immunizations in this country, the Institute of Medicine urged the public health community Tuesday to adopt innovative measures to ensure that all children receive their vaccinations by the age of 2. A report issued by a special panel of the institute, part of the National Academy of Sciences, recommended greater collaboration among physicians, families and public health officials to achieve comprehensive immunizations.
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