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August 21, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Electric and hybrid vehicles may be better for the environment, but the California Legislature says they're bad for the blind. It has passed a bill to ensure that the vehicles make enough noise to be heard by visually impaired people about to cross a street. The measure would establish a committee to recommend ways the vehicles could make more noise.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1992
David Wolfe's efforts (March 31) to lobby bus drivers to announce bus stops complement the 30 recommendations of the Los Angeles City Human Relations Commission (HRC) resulting from its hearing on "Transportation Issues of People With Disabilities." This report was officially released in 1991. In addition to the blind, the hearing impaired, those in wheelchairs, the elderly and foreign speakers with disabilities have a variety of special transportation needs. To meet these special needs the HRC recommended, for example, that "talking signs" aid vision-impaired riders to identify buses, that internal electronic screens aid the hearing-impaired to identify stops, that all bus drivers receive additional training in use of lifts for those in wheelchairs and that the RTD disabled riders' emergency line be expanded to provide more multilingual service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1985
Your lamenting defense of Rose Bird was so typical. To imply that only lynch-minded, ultra conservative right-wingers are interested in unseating Bird and her few ivory-towered cronies, is yet another effort by The Times to influence the mentally impaired and uninformed. Some of us classic liberals, as well as intelligent moderates, view the prospect of removing these obstructive, self-indulgent despots from the bench as not only desirous but essential to the weal of both our judiciary and society in general.
NEWS
July 14, 2010 | By Jessie Schiewe, Los Angeles Times
With television shows such as "Nurse Jackie" and "Grey's Anatomy" regularly depicting physicians and nurses with substance abuse problems, some patients might begin to wonder whether in real life anyone is monitoring the people who provide lifesaving care. Perhaps not. Or, if workers are being monitored, they're not being monitored closely enough to fit some researchers' way of thinking. A doctor survey study published online Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1999
Re "Technology Replacing Braille," July 28: I have worked for the last four to five years with many blind friends and students and must take issue with several things. Regarding the statement that increasing reliance on tape recorders, letter magnifiers and computer voice translators leaves the visually impaired with a shaky grasp of the underlying structure of language: If a blind or visually impaired person has a piece of text or a book on a computer screen and is reading it with ears, word by word or letter by letter, along with all punctuation, how does this make for illiteracy any more than a person who is reading it with fingers word by word or letter by letter?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1985
June 24 was proclaimed as Drs. William and Howard House Day by the cities of Newport Beach and Los Angeles. A dual celebration was held that day honoring the lifetime accomplishments of these two dedicated physicians in their efforts "so all may hear." Most recent recognition has come with the Food and Drug Administration approval of the "House" cochlear implant originated by William House, M.D. These two men have redefined the Hippocratic oath by their extraordinary stature in humanitarian service.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | JOAN LIBMAN
Dr. Jay Goldstein of Anaheim Hills has spent the last five years researching and treating patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating disease characterized by incapacitating exhaustion and a range of other perplexing symptoms. Explaining his theory of an unknown retrovirus invading the immune system, inducing cells to produce a chemical transmitter affecting the entire body, Goldstein pauses. "You know," the family practitioner says, "some very respected physicians will tell you I am crazy."
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