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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1998
For all the expense and uneasiness it is bringing to Thousand Oaks City Hall, the federal investigation of the Hill Canyon sewage spill has the potential to provide something the city strongly needs: A clear, impartial verdict on who--if anyone--deserves blame for the mess. We welcome the outside investigation, urge the city to cooperate fully and swiftly and encourage the full spectrum of concerned citizens in Thousand Oaks to abide by its findings.
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BOOKS
April 7, 1985
In interviewing Arkady N. Shevchenko about "the Soviets' complete disregard of the impartial nature of the U.N. Secretariat" (Book Review, March 10), Juliana Geran Pilon asks or says nothing regarding the issue of Shevchenko and the United States' own disregard in having him spy. Pilon and the right-wing Heritage Foundation have chided American U.N. employees for their impartiality ("Americans at the U.N.: An Endangered Species," Backgrounder 247, Feb. 14, 1983, Pages 14-16). Such double standards are characteristic of the "philosopher" Pilon and the Heritage Foundation's attitude and approach to the United Nations.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2013 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
Edward Snowden may represent the archetypal leaker of the Internet age - a tech savant who justifies his civil disobedience as a righteous rebuttal to the big institutions he believes have intruded too far into ordinary people's lives. But it's not just the mole in the National Security Agency surveillance story who is operating in new channels. The reporters who brought his account forward also represent something distinct in journalism. In some cases, their profiles loom larger, particularly on the subject of security and spying, than those of their publications.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2011 | By Tom Hamburger, Washington Bureau
A government watchdog group alleges that two of the Supreme Court's most conservative members had a conflict of interest when they considered a controversial case last year that permitted corporate funds to be used directly in political campaigns. Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas are the subjects of an unusual letter delivered Wednesday to the Justice Department by the nonpartisan group Common Cause. The letter asks the department to look into whether the jurists should have disqualified themselves from hearing the campaign finance case if they had participated in a private meeting sponsored by Charles and David Koch, billionaire philanthropists who fund conservative causes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2006 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
Riverside County Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Schwartz was censured Thursday by the state Commission on Judicial Performance for statements he made to police during his arrest for driving under the influence of alcohol last year in Pismo Beach. The director of the commission said censure was the panel's most serious punishment short of being removed from the bench. Schwartz, 45, can continue to preside over criminal hearings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Louis Sahagun
An attorney for the man who was carjacked by former LAPD officer Christopher Dorner criticized guidelines the city is using to distribute a $1-million reward for his capture. In a letter sent to the LAPD's detective bureau Tuesday, an attorney representing Rick Heltebrake questioned the department's proposal to use a three-judge panel to determine who gets the reward for Dorner's capture and death, and questioned whether Heltebrake would get a fair shake. “Mr. Heltebrake is not opposed to the city's efforts to establish a procedure for the city to process and decide who is entitled to the reward,” wrote Allen Thomas, Heltebrake's attorney.
WORLD
June 9, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood
The death toll from a fire at a day-care center rose to 44 on Monday, as authorities promised their investigation would be unaffected by family ties between a co-owner and the wife of President Felipe Calderon. Officials in the northern border state of Sonora said three more children had died as a result of Friday's fast-moving blaze, during which rescuers found only one working door. The episode has raised questions about official oversight of the preschool, known as ABC.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
After more than three hours, Elena Kagan, the solicitor general of the United States, got her chance to speak directly to the panel of senators who will weigh her nomination to be the next Supreme Court justice and promised to do her best and work hard while keeping her mind open to deal with contentious issues. Kagan avoided taking any specific positions Monday on the contentious social issues on which she will likely rule, if confirmed. Nominated to become the 112th justice on the Supreme Court, she took a modest stand while promising to work impartially for justice for all. "I will make no pledges this week other than this one -- that if confirmed, I will remember and abide by all these lessons," she told the Senate Judiciary Committee.
NATIONAL
October 3, 2008 | JAMES RAINEY
At least one figure on the stage for Thursday night's vice presidential debate reached a high standard for reason, fairness and class. Gwen Ifill of PBS demonstrated abundant dignity as referee of the much-anticipated debate between Sarah Palin and Joe Biden. The veteran newswoman lived up, in every sense, to her title: moderator. She directed the candidates to important topics, pushed to keep them on subject and betrayed no favoritism.
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