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Imperial County

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Less than a month after it was signed amid hoopla about bringing "peace" to the Colorado River, a landmark deal for Imperial Valley farmers to sell water to San Diego County has been hit with two lawsuits alleging that the dealmakers failed to adequately evaluate damage to the valley's environment and economy. Although such lawsuits were anticipated, the source of them was not: the Imperial County Board of Supervisors, and a dissident faction of farmers known as the Imperial Group.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2003 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had erred in blaming Mexico for unhealthful air quality in the Imperial Valley and that the agency must impose more stringent control measures on the U.S. side of the border. The decision by the 9th U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2003 | From Associated Press
Authorities in Mexico arrested four men after the discovery of an underground tunnel that led from an auto repair shop in Mexicali, Mexico, beneath the U.S. border. The tunnel, discovered Friday by city crews digging trenches in Calexico, was more than 4 feet high and zigzagged more 250 yards beneath the border. It was equipped with lighting and ventilation and reinforced with wood, said Ricardo Sandoval of the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
In a finding that further complicates negotiations over a proposed Southern California water deal, a Caltech scientist has concluded that the Colorado River is entering a dry period and may not be as bountiful in coming decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2003 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
Federal wildlife officials have proposed designating about 53,000 acres in Imperial County as critical habitat for the threatened Peirson's milk vetch plant, a move that cheered environmentalists but concerned off-road vehicle enthusiasts. Such a designation would not automatically close the rugged area to off-road vehicles, but it would prohibit the federal government from funding, authorizing or carrying out activities that could harm the milk vetch, a purple-blooming member of the pea family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2003 | Li Fellers, Times Staff Writer
Five men died and two were critically injured Tuesday when they were ejected from a car speeding down a stretch of Interstate 8 in Imperial County, authorities said. The compact sports coupe was loaded with eight people and traveling more than 100 mph when it rolled over, according to authorities. The driver, Brigido Cruz, a 35-year-old Mexican national, was arrested on suspicion of homicide because investigators believe he was driving the car in a reckless manner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
Last weekend's earthquake swarm just outside the town of Brawley is yet another demonstration that the Imperial Valley is one of the state's most quake-prone areas. Scores of small quakes regularly hit the region -- swarms that scientists believe are caused by the subterranean injection of magma that heats the Earth and facilitates repeated jolts. Imperial County is at the northern tip of a volcanically active area extending down the Gulf of California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
A federal judge has ruled that the Bush administration failed to complete an environmental review of plans to ship electricity into California from power plants in Mexico, dealing a potential blow to the project less than one month before operations are to begin. Judge Irma E. Gonzalez found that the U.S. government's environmental review allowing the import of power from two plants near the border city of Mexicali, Mexico, failed to fully consider effects on air and water pollution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2003 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
They're the two scrawny kids in the schoolyard. Both have sky-high unemployment. Their educational attainment and median income levels are in the tank. A fourth of their populations live in poverty. And each struggles with an agricultural economy that is both blessing and curse. If Tulare and Imperial counties share so many problems, leaders reasoned, why not share solutions? Now, the economic development gurus in the two poor counties have teamed up to do just that.
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