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Import Quotas

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June 12, 1985 | Associated Press
The International Trade Commission today recommended a five-year program of import quotas to aid the U.S. shoemaking industry, which says it has been overrun by shipments of foreign footwear. The final decision is up to President Reagan. Four of the five commissioners joined in a recommendation for an overall import quota of 474 million pairs of non-rubber footwear. Shoes with a customs value under $2.50 would be excluded.
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BUSINESS
August 14, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
The price of sugar on world markets has soared this year, prompting a coalition of the nation's largest food manufacturers to warn of a pending shortage and to ask the Agriculture Department to ease quotas on imports. But although prices have risen domestically and abroad, analysts say fears of empty supermarket shelves are overblown and that the gloomy outlook of big food companies is really part of a larger effort to pressure the government into dismantling sugar trade barriers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1985
I am shocked and surprised by your editorial (June 14), "Giving Consumers the Boot." What you are trying to say is that the American domestic shoe industry does not know how to compete and you are concerned that quotas will raise prices on shoes. From 1976 to 1980, when we had orderly marketing agreements , we also had inflation! Remember inflation? Your newspapers did not cost 25 cents at that time! During the period of inflation, when the average went up about 15%, shoes (under a quota system)
OPINION
February 18, 2007
AMERICANS PAY ABOUT double the world market price for sugar, a hidden tax that hurts everyone with a sweet tooth. Many beverage and food makers catering to that sweet tooth have long used corn syrup instead of sugar because it's cheaper, but the price of corn syrup is beginning to rise. So now would be a good time for the U.S. government to revisit its destructive farm policies. This is a classic case of a narrow, vocal lobby -- sugar growers -- benefiting at the expense of the larger economy.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The steel industry launched a formal campaign Wednesday to persuade Congress to renew steel import quotas, which are scheduled to expire later this year, despite opposition from steel users, who contend that the restraints have worsened shortages and pushed prices up. Amid a flurry of Capitol Hill press conferences, lawmakers from steel-producing states unveiled legislation that would extend the Bush Administration's authority to enforce the current program for another five years.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Agriculture Secretary Clayton K. Yeutter announced today a nine-month extension of the current sugar import quota year and an increase of about 860,000 tons in the amount of foreign sugar that can be imported. Import quotas are used to protect domestic producers from cheaper foreign sugar being dumped on the U.S. market. The original 1989 quota year began Jan. 1 and was to have ended Dec. 31. The extension lets the quota year run through Sept. 30, 1990.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Bush administration announced that it had accepted petitions from the U.S. textile industry to launch investigations into whether quotas should be imposed on 21 categories of clothing and textile imports from China. The decision further escalates a trade battle between the two nations and is expected to bring more pressure to bear on China to settle the disputes by reaching a comprehensive agreement covering clothing and textile trade to escape further quota cases.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1997 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is Limited Inc.--owner of Victoria's Secret, among other specialty apparel chains--secretly mislabeling Chinese-made garments to evade U.S. import quotas? That's the accusation made by a textile manufacturers' group in a lawsuit--which has wide implications for the future course of U.S. trade policy--filed recently in Los Angeles federal court.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1985 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Import quotas on Japanese cars will be eliminated next March, allowing for wide-open competition in the U.S. car market for the first time since 1981, Eji Toyoda, chairman of Toyota, Japan's largest auto maker, predicted here Wednesday. Toyoda said he expects the Japanese government to end its trade restrictions, which limit shipments of Japanese cars to the United States to 2.3 million units per year.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1989 | From Times wire services
President Bush has decided to extend the steel import quotas and a formal announcement is expected as early as Tuesday, Administration officials said today. The American steel industry has urged an extension of the quotas, which were instituted in 1984 for five years and expire Sept. 30. Bush had a major decision-making meeting on the subject about a month ago after hearing all sides of the question. U.S.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2005 | From Associated Press
President Bush denied a request to place quotas on steel pipe imported from China, saying the cost to American consumers would outweigh the benefit to domestic producers. U.S. pipe makers and a labor group condemned the decision. They had sought quotas on certain kinds of steel pipe used primarily in construction. They said a surge in imports from China was disrupting markets. The U.S. International Trade Commission had backed the request, but Bush rejected its recommendation.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
The U.S. and China have agreed that the Bush administration should extend quotas on sock imports from China until the end of the year while the two sides searched for an overall accord to guide textile trade. After a summit of negotiators in Washington this week, the U.S. trade representative's office said Wednesday that it had agreed with China to extend its "safeguard" on sock imports instead of imposing a new 12-month quota.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Bush administration announced that it had accepted petitions from the U.S. textile industry to launch investigations into whether quotas should be imposed on 21 categories of clothing and textile imports from China. The decision further escalates a trade battle between the two nations and is expected to bring more pressure to bear on China to settle the disputes by reaching a comprehensive agreement covering clothing and textile trade to escape further quota cases.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2005 | From Associated Press
U.S. and Chinese negotiators began a third round of talks seeking to strike a comprehensive accord to limit a flood of Chinese clothing and fabric imports. U.S. manufacturers said they were not optimistic that the two countries would be able to reach a deal, based on published reports out of China that the Chinese side did not plan to modify its previous offer. The talks are scheduled to wrap up today.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2005 | From Reuters
The U.S. textile industry asked the Bush administration to extend emergency import curbs on billions of dollars' worth of clothing from China beyond 2005, industry representatives said. "The reason we need to do this is because China is refusing to negotiate seriously on a comprehensive bilateral" textile agreement, said Cass Johnson, president of the National Council of Textile Organizations.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
European Union nations adjourned talks on a plan to unblock about 75 million garments held up at EU borders after Chinese textile imports broke 2005 quota limits. EU Trade Commissioner Peter Mandelson said there was broad agreement behind his proposal to release garments imported after the EU and China signed a June trade deal.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
New U.S. Trade Representative Carla A. Hills reiterated Tuesday that the Bush Administration will support a renewal of current U.S. steel import quotas but said she will first attempt to persuade other countries to cut their steel subsidies. In her first interview with reporters since taking office, Hills also indicated that she is moving to resolve the U.S. dispute with a European Community rule prohibiting the use of growth hormones in beef imported into community nations.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
The U.S. Commerce Department said it would delay a decision on a new round of import quotas on Chinese clothing and fabric to consider the possibility for a single comprehensive agreement with China to limit textile trade. A decision on curbing imports of six new categories of products, including wool trousers and brassieres, had been expected this week.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
The United States is expanding the list of clothing and textiles from China that will be hit with emergency import restrictions to protect U.S. producers, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. The new batch of Chinese goods facing restrictions are men's and boys' cotton and man-made-fiber shirts; man-made-fiber trousers; man-made-fiber knit shirts and blouses; and combed cotton yarn.
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