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In Vitro Fertilization

NEWS
May 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Five frozen, fertilized human eggs that have been in legal limbo since the couple who created them divorced must be donated to research despite the woman's desire to use them to have children, the state's highest court ruled Thursday. The Court of Appeals' unanimous decision upholds a contract Maureen and Steven Kass signed before completing in-vitro fertilization in 1993. The couple split after the attempt to have a child failed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1998
Australian biologists say they have for the first time developed a reliable, repeatable technique to produce horses through in vitro fertilization. Producing a foal through such techniques has been accomplished only twice before, and neither effort has been replicated. A team from the Goulburn Valley Equine Hospital in Monash announced Wednesday that a foal born March 9 was produced by injecting a single sperm into an egg, a technique developed to assist infertile humans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1998 | ERIKA CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County woman gave birth to quadruplets on St. Patrick's Day-although through in vitro fertilization, she had been implanted with only three eggs. One of the eggs split, producing identical twins. Connie and Brad Dinsmore, both 34, were "doing great" and looking forward to bringing their babies home in about a week, their nanny, Nadine Nash, said Wednesday. "They're ecstatic," she said. "They were really looking forward to having a family, and they got an instant one."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1998 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billy was conceived in 1990 in Los Angeles. He was born Monday in Tarzana. The reason for the delay was part modern medical science and part bookkeeping mistake. The embryo from which Billy grew languished forgotten in a freezer for 7 1/2 years, the longest known time for an embryo that was later revived and implanted in a woman's womb.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1998 | (Associated Press)
Aetna US Healthcare, a pioneer in covering infertility treatment, will eliminate benefits for advanced infertility procedures such as in-vitro fertilization, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported. The Blue Bell, Pa.-based health insurer, the nation's largest, said it is acting because too many people were attracted to its plans only to take advantage of the the expensive treatment.
HEALTH
October 20, 1997 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Arthur Wisot and Dr. David Meldrum Hartley & Marks 272 pages, $19.95 Southern California is home to some of the world's finest reproductive specialists. And, happily for people who live elsewhere, they all write books. This latest consumer guide to treatments for infertility comes from two highly respected practitioners and UCLA professors.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | FRANCES D'EMILIO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rosanna Della Corte divides her affection between "big" Riccardo and "little" Riccardo. The first is the teenager who died six years ago; the second is her other son, the one she gave birth to when she was 62 and desperate for a reason to keep on living. The sticky air and suffocating heat of these recent days remind her of both sons. "It was just like this when I was resting in bed, waiting to give birth to Riccardo," says Della Corte, who is now 65.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Edye Smith Stowe was in the kitchen with her husband and her parents when the call came from the doctor's office. She was pregnant. In seconds, the entire family was weeping, and a new chapter had begun in one of the most poignant stories to come out of the Oklahoma City bombing. Stowe was just 23 when the destruction of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building took the lives of her two sons, Chase, 3, and Colton, 2. Now, she has a new husband and the baby is due this winter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1997 | KIMBERLY SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Jean and Howard Garber had even buried their daughter, the letters began to arrive. Now, after an international plea that generated more than 80 responses, Jean and Howard Garber have found a surrogate mother to carry the fertilized eggs of their daughter, who died from leukemia in December. If the pregnancy is successful, experts say, it will be the first time a surrogate child has been born to a mother after her death.
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