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In Vitro Fertilization

NEWS
November 17, 1999 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Using three or more embryos at a time in test-tube fertilizations needlessly increases the risk of multiple births without boosting the odds of achieving pregnancy in most patients, according to a new government analysis being made public today involving 35,000 procedures.
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NEWS
May 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A black baby born to a white couple because of a mix-up during implantation of embryos at a fertility clinic has been handed over to his genetic parents. The baby, born Dec. 29 to Donna and Richard Fasano of New York, was given to the black couple, Deborah Perry-Rogers and Robert Rogers of Teaneck, N.J., on May 10 during a visit to the Fasano home. The baby is named Joseph. Donna Fasano, 37, also gave birth to a white boy, Joseph's fraternal twin, who is genetically hers and her husband's.
NEWS
May 12, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Genetic researchers have for the first time used high-tech reproductive techniques to remove the threat of sickle cell disease from an African American family's lineage. Using in vitro fertilization and genetic analysis on a single cell taken from 3-day-old embryos, a team from the Weill Medical College of Cornell University helped the couple conceive healthy twin girls who were neither sufferers of the lethal disease nor carriers of the defective gene that produces it.
NEWS
March 31, 1999 | From Associated Press
A woman who gave birth to twin sons--one black and one white--after another couple's embryos were mistakenly implanted with her own will surrender the black baby to his biological parents, her lawyer said. Donna and Richard Fasano had been raising the two as brothers since their Dec. 29 birth but she said in a handwritten statement supplied by her lawyer Tuesday: "We're giving him up because we love him. We both want what's in the best interest of the child."
NEWS
June 27, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Junko Ito's mother-in-law decided that it was time for her son to get a divorce, and she broke the news to Ito with an old Japanese proverb: "A woman barren after three years of marriage should leave." Her husband did not defend her against his heir-obsessed parents, so she left. Now 37 and remarried, Ito is at last expecting a child, conceived through in vitro fertilization.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Five frozen, fertilized human eggs that have been in legal limbo since the couple who created them divorced must be donated to research despite the woman's desire to use them to have children, the state's highest court ruled Thursday. The Court of Appeals' unanimous decision upholds a contract Maureen and Steven Kass signed before completing in-vitro fertilization in 1993. The couple split after the attempt to have a child failed.
NEWS
April 24, 1998 | From Associated Press
A 55-year-old woman who became pregnant by test-tube fertilization has given birth to quadruplets, making her possibly the oldest person in the United States to deliver four babies at once. The three girls and one boy remained in intensive care Thursday at Mary Birch Hospital for Women. One was in critical condition. At the woman's request, the hospital did not release her name. She gave birth Saturday; the babies were two months premature and were delivered by caesarean section.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1998
Australian biologists say they have for the first time developed a reliable, repeatable technique to produce horses through in vitro fertilization. Producing a foal through such techniques has been accomplished only twice before, and neither effort has been replicated. A team from the Goulburn Valley Equine Hospital in Monash announced Wednesday that a foal born March 9 was produced by injecting a single sperm into an egg, a technique developed to assist infertile humans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1998 | ERIKA CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County woman gave birth to quadruplets on St. Patrick's Day-although through in vitro fertilization, she had been implanted with only three eggs. One of the eggs split, producing identical twins. Connie and Brad Dinsmore, both 34, were "doing great" and looking forward to bringing their babies home in about a week, their nanny, Nadine Nash, said Wednesday. "They're ecstatic," she said. "They were really looking forward to having a family, and they got an instant one."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1998 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billy was conceived in 1990 in Los Angeles. He was born Monday in Tarzana. The reason for the delay was part modern medical science and part bookkeeping mistake. The embryo from which Billy grew languished forgotten in a freezer for 7 1/2 years, the longest known time for an embryo that was later revived and implanted in a woman's womb.
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