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Incas

NEWS
September 14, 1993 | KATHRYN BOLD
"Inti Raymi--The Inca Festival of the Sun" proved the perfect theme for a Saturday gala under the stars at the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana. Organizers chose the theme for the Bowers' annual La Fiesta fund-raiser to tie in with the opening of the museum's new exhibit, "Peru Before the Inca: Ancient Artworks From the Permanent Collections." About 350 guests paid $150 each to attend the gala, raising more than $50,000 in net proceeds for the Bowers' education programs for children.
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NEWS
July 23, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
Robert Young, the handsome leading man of films of the 1930s and 1940s who parlayed his considerable charm into television stardom in "Father Knows Best" and "Marcus Welby, M.D.," has died. He was 91. The ideal father for a generation, Young, who said he merely played the dad he yearned to have himself, died Tuesday night at his Westlake Village home. He had earlier undergone heart surgery and died of causes related to old age, according to his physician, Dr. John Horton.
TRAVEL
November 26, 2000 | MIKE McINTYRE
I first heard the name Lake Titicaca in my sixth-grade geography class. Once the snickering stopped, most of us thought it would be a cool place to visit. After 32 years, I went to see for myself. It wasn't hard to find. Andrea and I hopped a northbound bus in La Paz, and three hours later we stood on the shore of the lake that legend claims gave birth to the Incas and the sun. Straddling the border of Bolivia and Peru at 12,500 feet, it's one of the highest navigable lakes in the world.
NEWS
October 4, 1986 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
A UCLA graduate student who carried a class project to extremes is being credited with an archeological discovery in Peru that could prove of major importance in understanding the perplexing history of the Incas.
NEWS
March 19, 2002 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A settlement that may have been one of the last refuges of the Incas has been discovered on a remote and rugged Andean peak--a finding that could shed new light on the origin and demise of the last great Indian empire in the Americas. The settlement, on a peak known as Cerro Victoria, is in Peru's Vilcabamba region, where the Incas fled after Spanish soldiers crushed an Indian revolt in 1536.
WORLD
June 9, 2002 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in an inaccessible canyon in the remotest area of Peru, a British-American team has discovered what appears to be one of the last refuges of the Incas before their civilization was destroyed by the Spanish in 1572. Tipped off to the site's location by a native mule handler, the team hacked through dense forest with machetes for a week before finally descending 6,000 feet into a gorge on the Yanama river and encountering the jungle-shrouded city.
NEWS
December 22, 1996 | LYNN F. MONAHAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A piece of coarse, brownish-yellow cloth with a green stripe loosely covers the leathery skin of a Peruvian who died more than 500 years ago. Dried gourds, stubby cobs of corn and blackened beans, offerings buried along with the pre-Columbian resident of the Lima Valley, lie scattered among the pile of remains. Archeologist Daniel Guerrero dusts away grains of desert sand and lifts the fabric to show a bent knee, then points to a round bulge--the mummy's still covered head.
NEWS
August 24, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High on a dry Andean mountain, the excitement began to surge over a group of farmers as they gathered one recent weekend to witness the long-awaited revival of an ancient Inca canal they had rebuilt with stones, clay and painstaking labor. "Here comes the water!" shouted a man wearing a multicolored cap as he and others scrambled out of the canal before a muddy stream went glistening and gurgling by.
SCIENCE
August 12, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Two Harvard University researchers believe they have uncovered the meaning of a group of Incan khipus, cryptic assemblages of string and knots that were used by the South American civilization for record-keeping and perhaps even as a written language. Researchers have long known that some knot patterns represented a specific number.
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