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Incinerators

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NEWS
September 6, 1989 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian and legislative leaders tentatively agreed Tuesday to include incineration as part of a long-term strategy to reduce solid waste in California by 50% before the year 2000. The plan that emerged from a closed-door meeting in Deukmejian's Capitol office would place the major emphasis for solid waste reduction on recycling and other methods of reusing refuse, such as turning leaves into compost.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Standing on ridges miles away from the Rim fire, John Buckley has traced the path of the huge Sierra Nevada blaze by watching fire clouds billowing above the Stanislaus National Forest. The view has been sobering. As the Rim blaze burns its way into the record books, Buckley thinks it is roasting some of the last remaining old-growth stands in the Stanislaus forest, incinerating thousands of acres of young trees planted at a cost of millions of dollars after massive 1987 fires and destroying important nesting areas for California spotted owls and goshawks.
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NEWS
May 24, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
A Southern California company that was the first in the state to obtain permits to build a commercial hazardous waste incinerator has abandoned the Los Angeles County project, charging Thursday that "political pressure" had unraveled the 6-year-old deal.
WORLD
December 31, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Every day across Afghanistan, rural people crowd aboard rickety communal taxis that ply the roads linking remote towns and villages. And every day, they run the risk of what happened Thursday morning in Helmand province. A roadside bomb ripped through a minibus in the Nahr-e-Saraj district of east-central Helmand, incinerating the vehicle and killing 14 people, including men, women and children. The Taliban and other insurgent groups routinely seed roads that run through battle zones with explosives in hopes of killing and maiming Western troops ?
NEWS
March 10, 1993 | From Associated Press
A trial burn began Tuesday at a hazardous-waste incinerator that generated criticism from Vice President Al Gore and picketing by opponents. A federal judge cleared the way last week for Waste Technologies Industries to go ahead with a trial of at least eight days but said commercial operation must await an analysis of the test burning. The $160-million incinerator was completed last year along the Ohio River, 300 feet from a neighborhood and 1,100 feet from an elementary school.
NEWS
August 14, 1993 | Associated Press
A hazardous-waste incinerator targeted by protesters for more than two years has resumed limited commercial burning after completing tests of new pollution control equipment, a spokesman said Friday. The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency reported Thursday that preliminary tests of the new equipment showed that less dioxin was being released from the Waste Technologies Industries plant. Federal regulators accepted the test results.
NEWS
September 24, 1994 | Associated Press
The Army said Friday it will send a team from its safety center to investigate charges of unsafe conditions at its new chemical weapons incinerator in Toole, Utah. The Army said the move was being taken in the wake of allegations by Steve Jones, a former senior safety inspector at the site. Jones charged that the safety programs were so deficient that they pose a risk of "catastrophic release" of nerve gas into the atmosphere.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An incinerator has burned the last of the contaminated soil from Times Beach, Mo., the town wiped off the map to contain dioxin contamination. In the early 1970s, oil later found to be contaminated with dioxin was spread on Times Beach's gravel roads and ballpark. A decade later, the problem was discovered. The town was then evacuated and leveled, and the debris burned or buried. In 1985, Times Beach aldermen voted to disincorporate the town, and it ceased to exist.
NEWS
June 28, 1988 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
In a potentially costly rebuke of the San Diego City Council, a federal court judge Monday cleared the way for a private firm to start burning hazardous waste in an experimental incinerator atop La Jolla's Torrey Pines Mesa. Officials from Ogden Environmental Services promised immediately after Monday's court hearing to begin long-delayed test burns of waste within the next few months. If Ogden can win approval from the U.S.
NEWS
May 30, 1990 | JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved in concept the sale of the city's abandoned LANCER trash incinerator site in South-Central Los Angeles to a nonprofit group that plans to build 316 townhouses for low-income buyers. Under the plan, the Nehemiah West Housing Corp. would buy the 12-acre industrial site for $6.6 million, below the city's investment of $8 million. The project would mark the first major homeownership development in the South-Central area in a generation.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2010 | By Clement Tan, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Obama administration on Friday proposed reducing mercury emissions by more than 50% from industrial boilers, process heaters and solid waste incinerators by December. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said the plan would yield at least $18 billion worth of health benefits annually and prevent as many as 5,200 premature deaths and about 36,000 asthma attacks a year. The EPA estimates it would cost $3.6 billion to install and maintain pollution controls at the estimated 200,000 units across the country.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
milwaukee -- Don't be so quick to throw out that expired blood pressure medication. Drug disposal companies are taking outdated or recalled prescription drugs from pharmacies and manufacturers and incinerating them, generating energy. Milwaukee-based Capital Returns Inc. last year created enough energy to power more than 220 homes for a year. To do that, it incinerated 6.5 million pounds of pills and other pharmaceuticals, which are sent from pharmacies and drug manufacturers around the country.
NATIONAL
September 10, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A Florida county plans to ditch its dump, generate electricity and help build roads -- all by vaporizing garbage at temperatures hotter than parts of the sun. The $425-million facility expected to be built in St. Lucie County would use lightning-like plasma arcs to turn trash into gas and rock-hard material. It would be the first such plant in the nation and the largest in the world.
WORLD
December 13, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
A newspaper publisher and politician who had been one of the most outspoken critics of Syrian interference in Lebanon was assassinated Monday by a car bomb as he drove through the hills of Beirut. Gibran Tueni, a third-generation newspaperman and newly elected lawmaker, had returned to Lebanon the previous day from France, where he had taken refuge over the summer, saying his name was at the top of an assassination list in Lebanon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2005 | Steve Harvey
A discussion here of backyard trash incinerators, which were banned in L.A. in the mid-1950s, brought this note from Pat Wilson of Corona. "We had an incinerator," she recalled of her childhood, "and before I burned my worn-out paper dolls, I would cut their little heads off so they wouldn't feel the fire." Added Wilson: "The joke's on me. Paper doll sets from the '40s and '50s now sell for $100-plus." Oooh L.A. L.A.
NATIONAL
August 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An incinerator operator got the go-ahead from the state Environmental Quality Commission to start destroying part of the nation's stockpile of Cold War-era chemical weapons. Rockets loaded with the nerve agent GB sarin are scheduled to be removed from a storage igloo at the Umatilla Chemical Depot outside Hermiston beginning Wednesday and destroyed in the adjoining incinerator, U.S. Army spokeswoman Mary Binder said.
NEWS
December 23, 1991 | CONNIE KOENENN
In August, 1985, Robin Cannon opened her mail and read that the city of Los Angeles was holding a community meeting to discuss plans for a trash-to-energy incineration plant. The proposed site was a vacant lot at 41st Street and Long Beach Avenue in the South-Central neighborhood where Cannon lived with her husband and four children.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2004 | From Reuters
The Army temporarily shut down a chemical weapons incinerator in Alabama on Thursday after an alarm detected what the Army said were minute traces of a chemical agent in an observation corridor. Officials did not identify the substance but said there had been no threat to the $1-billion facility, which destroys deadly nerve agents such as sarin, or to the surrounding community. "No one at the site was injured," said Timothy Garrett, the site's project manager.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2004 | From Reuters
The Army temporarily shut down a chemical weapons incinerator in Alabama on Thursday after an alarm detected what the Army said were minute traces of a chemical agent in an observation corridor. Officials did not identify the substance but said there had been no threat to the $1-billion facility, which destroys deadly nerve agents such as sarin, or to the surrounding community. "No one at the site was injured," said Timothy Garrett, the site's project manager.
NEWS
September 16, 2003 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
Sit me down in a SHADY SPOT OUT HERE, lay out the tale of how these strange stacks of granite and gneiss took shape more than a billion years ago, and I will pay attention. It's interesting, in a Precambrian sort of way. To really get my attention, however, just walk me around to the backside of that same formation and point out the rock niche that someone has splattered with purple, orange and yellow graffiti.
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