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Income Gap

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1999 | ROBERT RECTOR and REA HEDERMAN, Robert Rector is a senior research fellow and Rea Hederman is a policy analyst at the Heritage Foundation
A few days ago, the U.S. Census Bureau released its annual report on income and poverty in the United States, including data on income distribution. As it does every year, the Census found a yawning income gap between the rich and the poor. However, the report is a gross exaggeration; the income gap is a gully, not a canyon. The Census Bureau measures income distribution by dividing society into fifths, or quintiles, and then calculating the share of total income received by each.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999 | FRANK BENEST and RUSTY KENNEDY, Frank Benest is city manager of Brea, and Rusty Kennedy is executive director of the Orange County Human Relations Commission
Orange County is poised to become an increasingly vibrant, world-class economy, as illustrated by the projection that over the next 20 years it is expected to add 746,000 new jobs. Our export growth outpaces the rest of the Pacific region and the United States as a whole, and our fast-growing high-tech sector boasts the seventh-highest concentration of tech-related jobs among all U.S. metropolitan areas.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
College-educated black women have nearly closed the income gap with their white counterparts, according to a snapshot of black America released by the U.S. Census Bureau. Black women with bachelor's degrees made 98% of what white women with the same level of education did in 1995, the figures showed. College-educated black men's income was 73% of that of similarly educated whites. Women of both races made less than men. Black per capita income overall was 56% of white income.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Countering a long-term national trend, members of most minority groups in Southern California earn less today compared to whites than was true nearly 40 years ago, according to a new study. The income gap widened most dramatically between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites, the study shows. U.S.-born Mexican American men were paid about 81% of the median income of non-Hispanic white men in 1959, but the figure dropped to 61% by 1989.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Countering a long-term national trend, members of most minority groups in Southern California earn less compared with whites than was true nearly 40 years ago, according to a new study. The income gap widened most dramatically between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites, the study shows. U.S.-born Mexican American men were paid about 81% of the median income of non-Hispanic white men in 1959, but the figure dropped to 61% by 1989.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three days after President Clinton proclaimed the nation "on the cusp" of reversing its worst social problems, his outgoing Labor secretary issued an unusually public word of caution, warning that the continuing gap between rich and poor "threatens to blight an otherwise promising future." With pointed references to the president's campaign rhetoric, Robert B.
NEWS
July 15, 1996 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The gap between rich and poor in California has been steadily widening in the last three decades, as the rich got a little richer and the poor got a lot poorer, according to a study released today by a new California think tank. Though California's gap has generally mirrored the national income gap, "it has exceeded the nation in the last seven years--which is not something to be proud of," said Deborah Reed, principal author of "The Distribution of Income in California."
NEWS
March 20, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The income gap between the richest and poorest American families--a politically charged issue that figures to weigh heavily in this year's elections--kept widening during the early 1990s despite a recovering economy, a major new study reported Tuesday. The study, called the first comprehensive look at patterns of income distribution in the 1990s, said that the people who pulled ahead economically generally were older, highly educated and members of families headed by married couples.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1996 | WARREN BENNIS, Warren Bennis is Distinguished University Professor of business administration at USC and the author of "On Becoming a Leader" (Addison-Wesley)
It is extremely likely that in the next decade the United States will experience a period of social unrest unequaled in this century. It will dwarf the protests of the late 1960s and early 1970s. The recent strikes and other demonstrations in France are a portent of what is to come for us. Several things lead me to this dreary prediction: % The growing disparity between the nation's rich and its poor.
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