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Income Inequality

BUSINESS
November 8, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - China's new leaders, set to be unveiled next week at a once-a-decade transition, will soon be handed the keys to the world's second-largest economy. But unlike their predecessors, who embraced growth at all costs to spur the country forward, China's incoming rulers will be tasked with steering the economy toward a more sustainable path. China must boost its private sector, reduce its reliance on low-cost exports and big-ticket public projects, and put more money into the hands of ordinary Chinese, experts said.
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OPINION
September 10, 2010
Experts have been sparring for decades over the impact of tax rates on the economy, an unresolved debate that raged a little louder after President Obama argued in a speech Wednesday in Ohio that the tax cuts approved under President George W. Bush should be allowed to expire for the top 2% of income earners while being extended for the middle class. Republicans firmly oppose that idea, proposing instead to make all of the Bush cuts permanent. We're wondering if they've checked in with the CIA on that.
OPINION
June 11, 2000 | Karlyn Bowman, Karlyn Bowman is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute
A 1999 Times poll found that nearly 60% of Californians who described themselves as working or lower class expected they would be able to move up the economic ladder. Many at the bottom have, in fact, been making progress during this long expansion. This may be one reason why inequality, a hot topic for politicians and journalists in the 1980s and early 1990s, is getting less play these days. When people at the bottom and top are gaining ground, inequality is less potent.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By David Lauter
WASHINGTON - President Obama's sixth speech on the state of the union will spotlight many issues, but more than anything may illuminate the vast gap between his policy ambitions and the tools he has to achieve them. The president made the ambition clear last month, when he referred to a “dangerous and growing inequality and lack of upward mobility” in the United States  as the “the defining challenge of our time.” His overriding goal, he has said in speeches and interviews, is to reverse the trend in which incomes for most Americans have stagnated since the late 1970s while the share going to the wealthiest has soared.
NEWS
April 26, 2014 | By Jon Healey
Some California lawmakers worry that California is losing too many businesses to other states. State Sens. Mark DeSaulnier (D-Concord) and Loni Hancock (D-Berkeley) evidently worry that we're not losing enough. DeSaulnier and Hancock are the authors of SB 1372 , a measure that purportedly addresses one of the most talked-about (and, Democrats hope, politically fertile) problems with the U.S. economy: income inequality. Specifically, they take aim at the compensation packages that publicly traded corporations give their chief executive officers.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN
The "digital divide" has been back in the news recently--but, as usual, only briefly. On July 8, the Department of Commerce's National Telecommunications and Information Administration released its latest report in a series called "Falling Through the Net." This is an ongoing study of telephone, computer and Internet use in the U.S. that can be viewed at http://www.ntia.doc.gov/ntiahome/digitaldivide. In it, the government reported (using 1998 data) that 40% of U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2012 | By Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week Nov. 4 - 10 in PDF format This week's TV Movies       SERIES Richard Hammond's Crash Course:  Richard trains to be one of the crew tasked with changing a wheel in an IndyCar race in Sonoma in an episode that features a drive around the racetrack with legendary driver Mario Andretti (7 and 11 p.m. BBC America). How I Met Your Mother:  Barney (Neil Patrick Harris) decides to take action when Robin (Cobie Smulders)
NATIONAL
September 20, 2013 | By David Horsey
Since the economic disaster of 2008 sent incomes spinning downward and the jobless rate shooting upward, at least one group of Americans has found a path back to prosperity: the top 1%. Over the last four years, the super-rich have been able to rake in 95% of all income gains.  That's right, according to a new study by Emmanuel Saez, an economics professor at UC Berkeley, while the number of poor Americans has risen and members of the middle class...
BUSINESS
April 14, 1991 | GEORGE L. PERRY, GEORGE L. PERRY is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution research organization in Washington
One of the classic trade-offs in economics is between equity and efficiency. Under many circumstances, arrangements or policies that enhance one of these goals do so by sacrificing some of the other. Since the early 1970s, the U.S. economy has managed to do poorly on both counts.
NEWS
September 1, 2008 | Leo Hindery Jr., Leo Hindery Jr. is currently managing partner of a New York-based media industry private equity fund. He chairs the Smart Globalization Initiative at the New America Foundation and is an unofficial economic advisor to Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama.
Not all that long ago, America's prominent business and government leaders widely believed that our nation's prosperity depended on a strong middle class growing from the bottom up. Workers were rewarded for their hard work with fair wages, benefits and advancement opportunities -- and our economy and our national security were much stronger for it. Henry Ford certainly knew this, and often said that his company would prosper only if his workers...
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