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OPINION
December 16, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The state's new formula for funding schools is a tremendous gift for districts that enroll large numbers of disadvantaged students. But it's not quite the giveaway some of them had expected. The hoops they must jump through to get the extra money have riled John Deasy, superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District, as well as the leaders of several other districts. Deasy calls them outrageous and claims they cheat Los Angeles students of their fair share. His chief concern is that the state rules for verifying a family's poverty level are burdensome, and that they're unnecessarily stricter than federal regulations that qualify students for subsidized lunches.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 2013 | By Don Lee and Shan Li
WASHINGTON - After six years of a gloomy recession and shaky recovery, the U.S. economy looks poised to regain its glow next year with stronger job growth, bigger income gains for more people and a resurgence of homeowners moving up into new digs. The overall economic outlook for the U.S. has improved sharply in recent weeks amid a string of surprisingly robust economic data: Businesses have stepped up hiring, new factory orders from abroad are at a two-year high and consumers have been flocking to car lots and restaurants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
Major California school districts fear they will be shortchanged millions of dollars in funding for their low-income students under new state rules requiring them to verify family incomes every year. Officials in Los Angeles, San Diego, Fresno and elsewhere are scrambling to collect verification forms but said that hundreds of families have not yet turned them in - potentially jeopardizing funding that school districts are counting on this year. At stake, for instance, is $200 million in L.A. Unified and $6 million in San Diego.
OPINION
December 6, 2013 | By Daniel Markey
Pakistan's retiring army chief, Gen. Ashfaq Kayani, last week passed the baton of his nation's most powerful institution to Gen. Raheel Sharif. A fresh face at the helm of the Pakistani military undoubtedly raises American hopes for a less frustrating relationship, as the last six years of dealing with Kayani were anything but smooth. Realistically, however, Washington should keep its expectations firmly in check and at least one eye out for trouble. Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif (no relation to the new army chief)
NATIONAL
December 4, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Wednesday declared an end to the war on budget deficits and pledged instead to fight the "deficit of opportunity" for the poor and middle class. In a lengthy speech on his economic priorities, Obama said the federal deficit was under control and no longer presented a serious threat to the economy. "When it comes to our budget, we should not be stuck in a stale debate from two years ago or three years ago," Obama said at a nonprofit social services center in a poor neighborhood in the capital.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama made a highly personal case for raising the minimum wage and strengthening the social safety net in an address Wednesday recalling the government programs that helped him and his wife get ahead in life. In a lengthy speech about income inequality in America, Obama declared it the “defining challenge of our time” to make sure the economy works for rich and poor alike. “I take this personally,” Obama said. “I'm only here because this country educated my grandfather on the GI bill.” PHOTOS: 2013's memorable political moments When his father left and his mom hit hard times trying to raise two children while going to school, he said, “this country helped make sure we didn't go hungry.” And when Michelle Obama's working-class parents wanted to send her to college, he said, “this country helped us afford it until we could pay it back.” “What drives me as a grandson, a son, a father, as an American,” he said, “is to make sure that every striving, hardworking, optimistic kid in America has the same incredible chance that his country gave me.” In what sounded at times like a preview of a State of the Union address, Obama spelled out his economic priorities and outlined his approach as he enters negotiations with congressional Republicans over budget and fiscal matters.
OPINION
December 1, 2013 | By Scott Klinger
Many of the nation's top CEOs have joined forces to "fix the debt. " They want to achieve this goal, in part, by reducing Social Security benefits and raising the retirement age to 70. One of the chief executive officers, David Cote, runs Honeywell. "As an American, I couldn't know about this problem and not try to do something about it," Cote told Wall Street Journal TV. Cote has $134 million in his Honeywell retirement account, according to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and he has worked there only 11 years.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
Molina Healthcare Inc. of Long Beach was looking after the medical needs of low-income people long before Obamacare debuted. Molina Healthcare began 33 years ago after emergency room physician C. David Molina had seen too many poor people with easily treatable and preventable illnesses. He opened three small clinics in Long Beach to serve them. The company currently offers Medicaid-related, licensed health plans for low-income families and individuals in California and nine other states.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2013 | By Lisa Zamosky
If you go online to shop for health insurance through California's exchange, Covered California, you may feel befuddled at times. An estimated 1.9 million Californians could qualify for a subsidy or tax credit, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. But to determine whether you're among them and apply, you'll need to report your income and the size of your family on the application. It seems straightforward enough. But many consumers are finding that the process can get complicated.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2013 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I'm a single mom with three kids. My mortgage is $1,700. My other monthly bills include $355 for a car loan, $755 for school tuition, $350 for utilities, $790 for credit cards, $200 for gas, $208 for braces and $235 for a 401(k) contribution. This leaves no money for food. I get no child support. How can I pay down my credit card debt? I don't have any money for a baby sitter or I could get a second job. Answer: The way you pay down credit card debt is by reducing expenses and increasing income to free up extra cash.
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